MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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NEW! Negative-Accentuated Machines
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southbeach

i wonder how the machine knows that i have completed the concentric phase before it quickly shifts the stack to vertical?

In any event, a very clever design. i hope it pans out! :)
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southbeach

Ellington Darden wrote:
I'll have my digital camera with me in San Francisco and I'm planning on taking plenty of photos of all the X-Force machines.

Look for the report in a week from now.

Ellington


Great news but will you also get in them test them out??
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Hello Dr. Darden,

Any chance your camera takes short video so we can see the machine in action?

Michael
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southbeach

Michael Petrella wrote:
Hello Dr. Darden,

Any chance your camera takes short video so we can see the machine in action?

Michael

great idea!!

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Ellington Darden

If you stop anywhere along the positive phase -- for as long as
1 second -- the machine reads that as you are finished. Automatically, in 1/2 second, it changes to the negative phase.

Ellington
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southbeach

Ellington Darden wrote:
If you stop anywhere along the positive phase -- for as long as
1 second -- the machine reads that as you are finished. Automatically, in 1/2 second, it changes to the negative phase.

Ellington


That's not a bad algorithm at all when you think about it. If you pause during the positive phase then you are probably shifting around in the 'seat' (no machine yet has perfect restraint) and, therefore shifting the load off the the target musculature to attempt to complete the lift.

Obviously at concentric failure in target musculature at this point, and should move immediately to the eccentric.

clever & logical design once again!

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Waynes

Switzerland

Ellington Darden wrote:
If you stop anywhere along the positive phase -- for as long as
1 second -- the machine reads that as you are finished. Automatically, in 1/2 second, it changes to the negative phase.

Ellington


So a 1.5 second lag ??? That very long.

Wayne

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southbeach

Waynes wrote:
Ellington Darden wrote:
If you stop anywhere along the positive phase -- for as long as
1 second -- the machine reads that as you are finished. Automatically, in 1/2 second, it changes to the negative phase.

Ellington

So a 1.5 second lag ??? That very long.

Wayne



you raise a good point.

it's not perfect but it's a darn sight closer to perfection than what we have now!
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overfiftylifter

Dr. Darden, you are a true gentleman and scholar.

Overfiftylifter-greatly looking forward to your report. As posted elsewhere,any info on the home gym would be appreciated.
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Ellington Darden

Overfiftylifter,

I don't get into this sort of thing often, but thank you for your comments.

Ellington
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admnautilus

Washington, USA

Like David, A friend and I(Luke Gillock) will be at the show on Wed. This is the only reason we are attending. Amidst all the cardio tools we hope to find that X-force will give us that glimmer of hope again for proper exercise coming from an equipment company.

We are going to try and actually do a complete HIT workout on the new pieces. Of course we will not use all of them in one workout. This will give us a better idea of how these machines will function in a workout setting. If they workout as well as Dr. Darden has said it should improve the efficency of the typical hit workout. In fact it should not only fatigue a client quicker but inroad them deeper. Probably a 30% increase in effectivness. Not bad! When was the last time we all have seen this type of jump forward?

Maybe around 1970?What did Arthur always say "Look for ways to work harder and briefer". I think Arthur would be impressed. I am looking forward to putting this equipment to the test and really hope to add some to our facilities. Jeff
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Ell,

You need to stop by and try out Randy Rindfleisch's new machine.

It uses a motor instead of a weight stack to provide resistance, so the positive, static and negative always match the resistance required by the user, accommodating both the change in strength, the change in the ratio of positive to negative strength, and the unique strength curve of each user over the full range and for the full duration of the exercise - something no weight stack dependent machine can do. The turnarounds aren't only smooth - they're adjustable. You can set the rate of acceleration you want for the turnarounds. I think even Ken Hutchins would be impressed with how smooth they are.

Also, as I think many here have discovered, many weight stack machines lack enough resistance for stronger users for even regular reps, much less negative only. I have had many clients max out Nautilus and MedX machines - how much more resistance would a machine require to make the negatives really challenging?

Doesn't matter how strong a person is, the motor and the way this machine is geared make the resistance impossible to overcome. No matter how strong you are, the resistance is always enough.

Of course, you can always have people stand on a weight stack, but I don't see how you could get people to stand on the X-Force's weight stack with it moving and with the shielding over it.

The motorized resistance is much safer as well. It is impossible to lose control of or drop the weight, and if something happens the user can unload instantly, at any point in the ROM, without needing to set down or transfer a heavy weight to a trainer or training partner.
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admnautilus

Washington, USA

Hey Drew,
I have a question for you and it may seem silly to some. How is the feed back to the user on these? What I mean is, a lot of people like the feel of weights moving up and down and seeing this happen. It may not make a difference physically but what about client satisfaction from the feel of the motorized resistance. I know Kieser equipment(air resistance)has this problem. Most that have used Kieser for overall strength, do not care for the feel.

I like the concept of these new machines and they look like they would beat you silly. I would love to see this machine in action and feel it myself. Those of us that are looking for the most efficient workout I am sure won't care if it is weight stacks or motorized. Just how hard! Thanks, Jeff
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Jeff,

The one I'm working with is a prototype. The only feedback is an LED display showing draw on the motor - higher or lower numbers correlate to greater effort in the opposite or same direction of the movement arm. Production models will have a load cell and a screen displaying pounds of force produced and other information.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Is there any way to do negative only with the X-Force?
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DSears

Drew,

One of Dr. Darden's comments in the original article concerned the rate of inroad using the X-force machines. He thought a quicker inroad by doing a heavier negative would lead to more growth stimulation. What's your opinion on the rate of inroad using Randy's machines?

Thanks,

David
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admnautilus

Washington, USA

Thanks Drew,
This is much like the static only leg press we have. It also works off a load cell. The idea is to kep the numbers as high as you can for as long as you can. It is interesting to watch the time click away and the numbers fall rapidly no matter how hard you try to keep them up. How many exercises or body parts can you do off one machine? Is it one for all or will you need multiple machines? Jeff
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

I predict a significant rise in the number of cases of DOMS by Monday.

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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

admnautilus wrote:
Thanks Drew,
This is much like the static only leg press we have. It also works off a load cell. The idea is to kep the numbers as high as you can for as long as you can. It is interesting to watch the time click away and the numbers fall rapidly no matter how hard you try to keep them up. Jeff


That is due to a LARGE recruitment to create the peak force, and then within seconds both the TYPE IIx begin to retire, and the Neural Drive fatigues.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

DSears wrote:
Drew,

One of Dr. Darden's comments in the original article concerned the rate of inroad using the X-force machines. He thought a quicker inroad by doing a heavier negative would lead to more growth stimulation. What's your opinion on the rate of inroad using Randy's machines?

Thanks,

David


It would be far more rapid, since the resistance would be maximal during both the positive and negative for the entire duration of the exercise.

Regardless of changing the leverage of the weight stack on the X-Force, it's still a weight stack - if you're going to do more than one rep, the weight will not be maximal during any of the reps leading up to concentric failure. The selected resistance is what it is, from start to finish.

With Randy's machine, the resistance is maximal during the positive, static, and negative contractions from start to finish. Also, not everybody is exactly 40% stronger during the negative. This number probably varies between individuals, and whatever the starting ratio, it has been shown to change with fatigue. Your positive strength drops faster than your negative strength. While it is a huge improvement over conventional selectorized machines, I do not believe the X-Force could accommodate this change in ratio with fatigue, while Randy's does this automatically.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

admnautilus wrote:
Thanks Drew,
This is much like the static only leg press we have. It also works off a load cell. The idea is to kep the numbers as high as you can for as long as you can. It is interesting to watch the time click away and the numbers fall rapidly no matter how hard you try to keep them up. How many exercises or body parts can you do off one machine? Is it one for all or will you need multiple machines? Jeff


The prototype I'm testing was designed to do the following:

squat
deadlift
calf raise
dip
pulldown
seated press
shrug

I have found it also works well for:

stiff-legged deadlift (can't see the meter when bent over though)
bench press (laying on the seat)
row (laying on the seat, chest belted down)

The other one does:

leg press
calf raise
leg curl
chest press
row
trunk flexion

Other exercises are being built into it but I'm not sure I can say anything about those right now.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

BIO-FORCE wrote:
I predict a significant rise in the number of cases of EIS and DOMS by Monday.



Oh yeah. Count on it.
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Spidercam

Hi jastrain
I do enjoy reading your posts and agree totally with your train of thought.

The first image that came to mind was the old compound leg machine with a tilting stack unit connected to each end.

Built like a bridge.
Unmistakable gen 1 character.
Cutting edge technology.

Also,I wonder how the Medx medical lower lumbar might perform with one of these units fitted.
The software might even be under construction at the moment.
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southbeach

Drew Baye wrote:
DSears wrote:
Drew,

One of Dr. Darden's comments in the original article concerned the rate of inroad using the X-force machines. He thought a quicker inroad by doing a heavier negative would lead to more growth stimulation. What's your opinion on the rate of inroad using Randy's machines?

Thanks,

David

It would be far more rapid, since the resistance would be maximal during both the positive and negative for the entire duration of the exercise.

Regardless of changing the leverage of the weight stack on the X-Force, it's still a weight stack - if you're going to do more than one rep, the weight will not be maximal during any of the reps leading up to concentric failure. The selected resistance is what it is, from start to finish.

With Randy's machine, the resistance is maximal during the positive, static, and negative contractions from start to finish. Also, not everybody is exactly 40% stronger during the negative.

This number probably varies between individuals, and whatever the starting ratio, it has been shown to change with fatigue. Your positive strength drops faster than your negative strength. While it is a huge improvement over conventional selectorized machines, I do not believe the X-Force could accommodate this change in ratio with fatigue, while Randy's does this automatically.


Is the action isokinetic or isotonic?
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Isokinetic - the motor controls the speed of the repetition during the positive and negative - resistance depends on the effort put forth by the user.
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