MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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The New BB for Old-School Results 1
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markandspike

One of arthurs old routines

1. 2 sets of 10 repetitionsfull squats :06 (minutes)
2. 3 sets of 20 " one-legged calf raises :06
3. 2 sets of 10 " barbell standing presses :06
4. 2 sets of 10 " behind-neck chins :06
5. 2 sets of 10 " bench presses :06
6. 2 sets of 10 " regular-grip chins :06
7. 2 sets of 10 " parallel dips :06
8. 2 sets of 10 " barbell curls :08
9. 2 sets of 12 " pulley triceps-curls :06
10. 2 sets of 15 " wrist curls :02
11. 1 set of 10 " regular-grip chins :03
12. 1 set of 10 " parallel dips :03
13. 2 sets of 15 " stiff-legged deadlifts :06

Taken from bulletin 1

14. 2 sets of 10 " dumbbell side raises :06
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markandspike

And an old arm routine by arthur

At the moment, we are producing extremely good results from the following training schedule for the arms . . .

1 - One set of 10 repetitions, standing curl with barbell

2 - One set of 12 repetitions, Nautilus Triceps Machine

3 - One set of 12 repetitions, Nautilus Curling Machine

4 - One set of 15 repetitions, wrist-curls with a barbell

5 - One set of 15 repetitions, reverse barbell wrist-curls

That completes one cycle, and up to this point in the schedule there is no requirement for the "rush factor" - performed at the proper pace and with a brief pause between sets, the above five exercises should require about four minutes to perform; although little or no harm would result if as much as ten minutes was used.

6 - One set of 12 repetitions, Nautilus Triceps Machine

7 - RUSH - One set of parallel dips, maximum-possible repetitions

8 - One set of 12 repetitions Nautilus Curling Machine

9 - RUSH - One set of "front pulldowns" on a Nautilus Torso-Arm Machine, using a close grip, approximately 10 repetitions

10 - One set of 15 repetitions, wrist-curls with a barbell

11 - One set of 15 repetitions, reverse barbell wrist-curls
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k38wood

gosh, sorry about that PHS...
I evidently mistook you for a whiner.
Sure glad you're not one of those
"me...me" guys...
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kurtvf

PHS wrote:
In answer to Kim, I have been training the high intensity way since the late 1970s when the first Nautilus health clubs came out, in large part because of the guidance received from Dr. Darden's books. I am not sure how tough that makes me. After all, I never played or coached in the National Football League.

But I do know that I am tough enough to ask the difficult questions that I am confident others are wondering about as well, knowing that some folks are going to take off after me.

I mean no disrespect to anyone, especially the authors. But the point that the customers of this book would have been better served by having it made available through traditional bookseller channels, regardless of the obvious rights of those authors to sell it in whichever way they would like, needed to be made. And, again, I am at least tough enough to make a controversial point and not back down from it.

I am also entitled as much to my opinion as the authors are to their rights to market the book however they choose, as long as I am being respectful (which I think I have been). We can respectfully agree to disagree, I hope, and still support the book, its authors, and the principles of HIT.


Ever try to buy a Rolex or a Ferrari?? Can't buy them on Amazon or Walmart either, and often there is a considerable wait....And you know what they say about opinions....

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kurtvf

Remember the days before the internet??? Books just showed of on the shelves of bookstores. No anxiety, no anticipation, no problem....you just saw them and said "wow, a new book!" MUCH simpler.
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seanmbowers

Ellington Darden wrote:
Paul, we're all anxious, especially me.

As soon as the ordering process is solved, and totally secure, the book will be announced . . . and orders taken and shipped.

I'd like to say that this is just around the corner, like the first part of next week. But I've done that several times and I've had to eat my words.

Again, I'm very sorry about the delay.

Ellington


Man am I excited! I love your books Ell! I haven't navigated this site thourghly. Is there any solid nutritional info on the forum?

God Bless,
Sean

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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

k38wood wrote:
ah, the search for the "missing piece"...in over 30 years of selling
machines I ran into all kinds of people. Believe it or not there were
men who couldn't train unless they had a whole line of Nautilus machines...
they had to have things "perfect"...
of course, I sold them machines but I
was really laughing at them underneath...

essential to the real meaning of
Arthur Jones and Nautilus was being
resourceful...the "will" to improve
and the intellegence to do it the right
way regardless of the situation
was key...

I'm sure Ell's new book is a dandy but the answer is inside "you"...not any book.



Damn Straight!

Regards,
Andrew
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markandspike

Arthur recommended that a bodybuilder perform the following five exercises, with little rest between them:
1) Behind-the-neck machine
2) Pullover machine
3) Behind-the-neck pulldown machine
4) Rowing torso machine
5) Negative-only chins on multi-exercise machine
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Nobodaddy

Ellington contradicts many of his previous statements in this article. I have articles written by him advocating super slow as well as many other methodes he seems to criticize here. Ellington was a big fan of Ken Hutchins for awhile.
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kevindill

Maryland, USA

Nobodaddy wrote:
Ellington contradicts many of his previous statements in this article. I have articles written by him advocating super slow as well as many other methodes he seems to criticize here. Ellington was a big fan of Ken Hutchins for awhile.



Learning new things often means changing your mind, and revising your opinions. If you are unlucky enough to have written something and have it published, people will hold it against you years later after you may have formed other opinions. Some will call you inconsistant, other will say you contradict yourself, I say it just means you learned a little more than you knew before.

Regards,
Kevin
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Ellington Darden

Nobodaddy wrote:
Ellington contradicts many of his previous statements in this article. I have articles written by him advocating super slow as well as many other methodes he seems to criticize here. Ellington was a big fan of Ken Hutchins for awhile.


In my new book I recommend many different methods of performing repetitions -- and one of them is super slow. In fact, one chapter is exclusively about super slow. Ken Hutchins continues to be a great friend and I talk with him every couple of weeks.

Ellington

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adam83

Virginia, USA

Dr. Darden,

How do you recommend to use the advanced training techniques? For example, on Wednesday I did my workout and used drop sets/breakdown sets (got 3-5 more reps with lower weight after reaching failure) for every exercise. Is that the right way to do it? Should I only focus on doing drop sets for 1,2, or 3 exercises instead of them all? If I do only focus on using drop sets for a few exercises, how long should I repeat that for before I pick a few different exercises to use them on?

I am really enjoying HIT, I've been able to increase my reps every workout so far for the past 5 weeks. I'm not sure if I'm getting stronger or just getting closer to the point of failure. Sometimes one bodypart (usually the legs) are still sore by the time I get to the next workout. Should I train them anyway, skip the workout, or train everything but the sore bodypart?
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Ellington Darden

Adam,

Use drop sets for 3 or 4 exercises. Do not perform them for every exercise in your routine. I like doing them for the same exercises in consecutive workouts for no longer than 2 weeks.

Ellington
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decooper

Dr. Darden (or anyone else for that matter),
In your book you talk about the value of staying in school as long as possible for those looking to learn more about strength training and the like. Im interested in Ph.D. programs in Bioenergetics. Where should I be looking? I would like to discuss this all further with you.
thanks.

Dan Cooper
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Ellington Darden

Dan,

I'm partial to both the University of Florida and Florida State University. You should be able to review what each offers on their Web sites.

Ellington
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adam83

Virginia, USA

Dr. Darden,

Thanks for the advice. I think I'm going to take an extra day off since I drop setted every exercise on Wed just to give myself a little more recovery time.

Adam
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fraserme

Dr. Darden, a little off subject question.

I am interested in experimenting with a concept like the "Project Total Conditioning" done at West Point.

I have your New High Intensity Training book and I've read that chapter.

Do you have any suggestions or recommendations about the template in general and any possible changes you would make? That experiment was done what, about 30 yrs ago, in 1975?

I have a home gym with weights, a decent bench and a dip and chin apparatus.

I was just going to load up three different weights on the bars to help account for the different muscle group strengths and just work from largest to smallest muscles with minimal rest.

Any other thoughts or ideas?

Sorry so long,
thanks
Brian
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Ellington Darden

Brian,

I believe you have a doable plan. Let us know what happens as you progress.

Ellington
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hoppie

Dr. Darden,

What is the difference between this book and the New HIT which also focuses to a large degree on the old school era? Also, in your opening thread, it is suggested that some routines that were promoted in the New HIT, such as super slow reps, are not effective.

Does your new book call into question any of the principles found in the New HIT?

Thanks

Eric
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Ellington Darden

hoppie wrote:
Dr. Darden,

What is the difference between this book and the New HIT which also focuses to a large degree on the old school era? Also, in your opening thread, it is suggested that some routines that were promoted in the New HIT, such as super slow reps, are not effective.

Does your new book call into question any of the principles found in the New HIT?

Thanks

Eric


Eric,

I believe most of what you are questioning concerns the opinions of Tim Patterson. Although Tim has some interesting points, I do not agree with some of them.

The New Bodybuilding is an extension of the The New HIT. Super slow reps still have a lot of value and I often recommend them now.

In The New Bodybuilding I have ten different interviews, many additional stories about Arthur Jones, and a lot more photos compared to The New HIT. If you like one, you'll like the other.

Ellington

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omegapage

California, USA

In my new book I recommend many different methods of performing repetitions -- and one of them is super slow.

Ellington



Dr. Ellington,

I am new to the forum here but I am excited I found it. I have been bodybuilding off and on since 1987. In my glory day I got to 215 with 7% body fat and was planning on competing in Arizona. However, plans and life seem to change all the time and I missed my window.

At the time, I picked up a book a friend loaned to me and ended up asking to keep it. It is the Nautilus Bodybuilding Book with the foreword by Mike Mentzer. Since then I purchased the revised edition, bought all the "How to... in 12 weeks" books and got hooked on the workouts.

In reading through your forum I am seeing a lot of discussion here about reps, etc... but I have found that going back to that original book you wrote, using the routines outline and following the 10 exercises plan employing the NO, NA, NE as well as stages, super slows and breakdowns have worked amazing results. I was able to compete with any of my piers (unfortunately some were on steroids) in size and strength as well as having more flexibility and speed.

In my late 30?s now, and a bit out of shape (computer programmer) I just pulled that old book out of the closet and spent the last few weeks in the gym (using almost all exclusive nautilus equipment) and already see progress. Personally, I don?t see how you can improve on that, but in your opinion looking back at those ideas and seeing what's before us now has that much actually changed?

Thanks

Bill
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Ellington Darden

Bill,

You are right. Not much has changed. I reinforce the valuable "old" guidelines in The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results -- and then I surround it all with the confidence of Arthur Jones.

Ellington
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omegapage

California, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
Bill,

You are right. Not much has changed. I reinforce the valuable "old" guidelines in The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results -- and then I surround it all with the confidence of Arthur Jones.

Ellington


Thank you sir. Well, I will keep you posted on my progress now that I am back at it again. I find that I respond pretty fast to the routine.

I do have a question though...

I am mixing swimming in before I do my routine to get some stretch and warm-up time. I swim as many laps as I can , then proceed to my workout. In light if trying not to tax my recovery system too much, would you advise this?

My routine is:

Tu, Th, Sa swim / workout

Mo, We, Fr walks / martial arts / surf (only one of these, whatever I can fit in)

Su - rest

Thank you for your time.
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Ellington Darden

I believe your swimming is using up your recovery ability. I would not recommend continuing to do it.

Ellington
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darrol

Dr. Darden I just wanted to tell your latest book is your best. I couldn't put it down. I've been a HIT practitioner for 20 years, and have read all your books. I really liked your football conditioning drills and want to incorporate this into my training. I'm a judo practitioner and think the driils would help my level of conditioning. I typically use HIT 2x/week. How often can I use the sprint/dips/pullup drills. darrol
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