MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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The New HIT Revolution
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Riker1964

On the Beginner routines from the book, how much rest between exercises should you stick to?
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Ellington Darden

One to two minutes between each exercise.

Ellington
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Riker1964

But the idea would be to shorten that time as short as possible? Or do you wait for the Intermediate/Advanced level?
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Ellington Darden

Progressively shorten the time between exercises . . . yes. But don't go to extremes on this. Learn good form and great intensity first.

Ellington
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Riker1964

Thank you Dr Darden - can't wait to start true HIT on Monday.
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FiremanBob

Because I use only free weights in my home gym, I always have at least 1 min. (but not more than 2) between exercises. Last week at a hotel I used machines (Hoist) for the first time in years. I was amazed at how efficiently and quickly I could go through the routine - 30 secs between exercises, max.
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SteveOz

Just wanted to say... This book has provided me with the most awesome results I've ever had!!

I'm 38 this year, and have been lifting weights as an adjunct to sport(when I used to play more sport), and to keep fit, since I was 14.

By last year I noticed that an old back injury was giving me more grief than ever, and whilst I had worked hard at getting lean the high volume way (which did work), I was aggravating my injury by doing too much high impact aerobics, and too much high volume weight training. The results were great and looked great (mainly due to being lean) but the injury, and time spent in the gym seemed to put me on a slow road to growth, and my back just "stayed injured".

I first read Clarence Bass's "Challenge Yourself" and John Little's "Max Contraction Training", before reading your excellent book "The New High Intensity Training".... I have a biology background - and I thought that all the arguements for high intensity training made perfect sense, so I decided to give it a go...

Now, I knew I was already in the overtrained category, so I had to put my internal panic about not training every day to one side and give your routines a go... (by giving it a go - I do modify it a fair bit to suit my body and what it is saying to me)...

I walk most days, and do a little low impact aerobics on a "strider" machine on days in between weights (no more than 20 mins), but I perform one whole body workout once every 4 days (96 Hour break) or - if I'm too sore I've waited 7 and sometimes 9 days - and by God I've had some fantastic results... Especially in my problem area, my calves - they never seemed to grow no matter how much I did to them - and now one set to failure has sent them growing like a rocket!!

Since not recognising I had glandular fever some years ago, my thyroid now gives me grief by being underactive, so I watch what I eat, but you wouldn't know it. People accuse me of being genetically gifted, "living in the gym", being naturally lean, on steroids etc. But I swear, it's a result of working smarter, and the "gland" problem, is of no consequence - I never looked this good even when it was functioning fully.

I had never seen your book in Australia, so I ordered it through Amazon... and I've only met one girl trainer at my local gym who's even really bothered to take on board the HIT philosophy - every other trainer, and member, seems to be High Volume oriented.

The upshot is the back injury feels as if it's nearly gone - due to me resting enough to allow recovery, and I'm not speeding off to go to the gym every day like a madman....

I only wish I had known about HIT earlier. I pass on what I know to anyone who wants to listen - but most people do not believe me... I'm amazed as it makes
so much sense biologically speaking.

The only drawback is dealing with the jealous jibes I get from others in my age bracket who have not aged so gracefully... If you could show me a way to deal with them.... life would be perfect!!

Thanks Ellington... I'll keep doing my best to spread the word..!!
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kurtdoc

Georgia, USA

Dr Darden-

First off, awesome book! I was one of the guys in the gym 6x/week, sometimes 2x/day. I am 33 years old, 6'1 180 and was trying to do as the magazines said (ie eat 1.5-2g of protein per pound of body weight) and spending 45-60 minutes doing multiple sets and multiple exercies for each muscle group. I bought in to the supplement gimmicks as well.

I started thinking, all of that protein and all of those supplements can't be good for my kidneys and liver, and I don't want to have kidney failure or liver problems when I'm 50!!

I started your HIT routine about 2.5 months ago and am very happy with the results thus far (and much stronger than I used to be with the high volume training, especially legs!!). Thanks for a great book and a new perspective on working out!

I would like a similar physique to Andy McCutcheon's (ie fitness model). I know genetics plays a huge part here, but I'm not far off from my goal! Based on my attached pic, should I keep my calories down (ie 1700-1800 or so/day)and stick with the program and keep trying to lose the last couple pounds of fat around my waist/abs (ie, do you think I can get more "ripped"), or should I move on to the mass building phase of the program?

I do an A/B version of HIT lifting only 2 days/week with very little other exercise. Thanks in advance!

-Kurt
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Ellington Darden

Kurt,

I believe you should work at getting more ripped . . . then add more mass.

Ellington
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Riker1964

I have not found the chapter in the ASAP book, regarding Cario. Can someone point it out for me?

Also, it is recommended to start at 1500 cals. I was told that keeping cals this low will crash my metabolism. Can someone comment, do i need to zig-zag calories, (ie: 3 low days, 1 higher day)

TIA,

-Tom
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Riker1964

Dr Darden, you mentioned 1-2 min rest between sets on the beginner routines, if that is the case, where do you get the "cardio effect" from this training? I know you don't recommend any cardio outside of weight training HIT style, but with the long rest between sets, I don't see where you would get a "cardio effect" from that kind of training. Please advise as i want to do this right - I am in a BF% loss phase. TIA!
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Ellington Darden

You can get a cardio effect from training at a sustained heart rate, as you suggested. But you can also get a cardio effect from interval (up-and-down) training.

Eventually, as you get into better condition, you can gradually reduce the time between exercises down to a minimum of 30 seconds. Doing so will give you the best of both worlds.

Ellington
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theblade

Arizona, USA

The information in The New Bodybuilding for Old School Results is awesome. I'm especially fond of the chapter that deals with motor skill development. The description of Positive, Negative, and indifferent motor skill development, and how this relates to all sports is very exciting.

This book provides the HIT user with more insight than ever before.

I have been a HIT guy for 20 years, and can honestly say that I've never had a BAD workout. I've converted many high volume trainee's into HIT people, but if I had this book earlier, I would have converted a lot more.

After showing this book to a friend of mine, I put him on a new HIT routine, and in just 3 weeks he's exploding before everyones eyes. His workout consists of 6 exercises performed 3 times per week. Using the creatine loading principle outlined in your previous book, along with superhydration, has given him an amazing growth spurt, and made a believer out of him FAST.

Neck increased .25", Shoulders increased 1.25 ", Chest increased 2.50", Upper arms increased .50", forearms increased .25", Thighs increased 2.75" and calfs increased .25". The waist remained the same. His overall weight increased by 14 lbs, and his bodyfat is 10%

Keep in mind that this is a bodybuilder who is 42 years of age, and who has been in a training rut for about a year. I kept the number of exercises low, so that he could develop into a HIT routine and still manage a short time between exercises.

We nicknamed this our "Thunderstrike" routine.
1). Deadlift
2). Squat
3). Bench
4). Pullup
5). Overhead press
6). Dips

At the end of this week, we will change the routine slightly to include a specialized cycle.

This should give you an idea of the kind of results you can get with just a handful of exercises performed to momentary muscular failure.

Thanks so much for this incredible resource.

Blade.
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SteveOz

Look I'm sure the answer is on here somewhere, but dial up internet and searching seems endless, so I thought I'd just ask two things.

1. I had stumbled onto "MuscleNow", some online muscle building course that seems to allude to high intensity techniques, whilst at the same time bagging high intensity as a training system... follow link if interested (Sorry in advance if links aren't allowed)...

http://www.musclenow.com/hit.h...

Wondered your opinion on what they've written?

2. With that in mind, up to seven days off between workouts appears to be working (my body is often sore up until that point), but am I working out too infrequently? Clarence Bass and Mike Mentzer's HIT says that may be okay - but what are your thoughts?

I do very light cardio, walking or "Strider" (eliptical), on days in between - is that prolonging my recovery - or short circuiting gains?

I appear to be making gains - I haven't shrunk or lost definition...

Cheers for any help
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McNultyEssex

SteveOz,

I had a look at the link, but I wouldn't pay too much attention to it.

Contrary to what was said about HIT not being intense enough, or providing sufficient overload, HIT is focused around maximum intensity (i.e. muscular failure), and for this reason, an overload can be achieved much more effectively than lower intensity/higher volume protocols. As an example, if you manage 10 reps to failure with a certain weight during your previous workout, increased muscle might allow you to perform 12 reps to failure during the next workout; however, further increases in muscle can only come about by challenging the new strength levels by actually completing the 12 reps.

It's a fact of nature that hard exercise is needed for maximum improvements; no amount of easy exercise will cause your muscles to grow. Furthermore, the harder you work, the less you can take.


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SteveOz

Thanks for that McNultyEssex,

I thought deep down that he had it wrong, as when I used to do high volume, I was recovered within a day.... But with high intensity, I feel a pumped soreness that lasts quite a number of days - even bordering on a week sometimes...

Logically I think my body is saying - "Closed for repairs...or... hang on I'm making a few adjustments"... I haven't lost any size, and without measurements to back me up, I feel even a little bigger...

I just have that internal angst that maybe I'm taking it too easy, and am not going often enough, but I don't do the workout again until all soreness has disappeared...

I know Ell's book suggests going three times a week, reducing to once every five days... But I was initially very overtrained, and have slipped into once every five days (minimum)to even seven days with quite good results - but 24 years of high volume ethos still niggles away - even though my brain knows better...

Cheers
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d0lle

Dear Dr. Darden.

Some time ago I read New HIT and became convinced of the practical use of HIT. To keep it all as less confusing as possible I try to focus only on the teachings of Arthur Jones, and yourself.

Recently I read the Nautilus Bulletins, and they confuse me on some subjects related to your book.

In your book, and on this site, you imply that a workout of approximately 12 single set exercises, taking about 25 minutes, gives the best results. In his bulletins, Jones implies workouts of approximately one hour, doing two sets per exercise.

Also, Jones as well as yourself, imply that certain routines (supersets) produce the best results. These routines exist of 3 to 5 exercises, and are based on the pre-exhaust principle. Considering that the two of you also advice to work the entire body during one workout, I wonder what's best now.

Is it best to use supersets trough the entire workout, thus doing workouts that last approximately one hour, doing about 20 exercises, so 40 sets.
Or is it better to do only 12 exercises, so 12 sets, for 25 minutes?

The truth will probably be somewhere in the middle, but as you have already implied in on of the other threats, it is impossible to train oneself and HIT is not taken seriously by the bulk of bodybuilders. Leaving me confused on the matter.
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Ellington Darden

During Jones's earlier writings, and some of mine too, we recommended more exercises and sets than in our later materials.

One set to failure of 8-10 exercises is what I recommend today, given that you have access to quality equipment. Perhaps a few more exercises, if you only have barbells and dumbbells.

After you've trained consistently for a year, you can add some of my specialized routines -- for 1 to 2 weeks. Then, it's back to basic, whole-body routines for 2 to 4 weeks, before you do another specialized cycle.

Concerning the pre-exhaustion technique, I still feel that it's a terrific way to train occasionally.

Ellington
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joelburcham

Dr. Darden,

I love the New High Intensity Training. If you have the option of Nautilus machines or free weights, what do you recommend? I know you advocate Nautilus machines, but you use free weight examples frequently in the book.

Thanks,

Joel Burcham
Asst. Professor of Voice
CU-Boulder College of Music
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Ellington Darden

joelburcham wrote:
Dr. Darden,

I love the New High Intensity Training. If you have the option of Nautilus machines or free weights, what do you recommend? I know you advocate Nautilus machines, but you use free weight examples frequently in the book.

Thanks,

Joel Burcham
Asst. Professor of Voice
CU-Boulder College of Music


Joel,

Use Nautilus, if you have it available.

Ellington

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docusc

I am 6'6" 245lbs what should my target calories b e for this program?
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SteveOz

Hi again - just a question for Ell...

I seem to be only able to manage a high intensity workout once every five to seven days - and have never looked more ripped, watching what I eat of course, and I do walk (not fast) for around an hour most days in between.

But lately I have been getting back into surfing, and I'm finding (esp. if the surf's good) even though I wait a clear day or two in between the HIT workout and surfing, the paddling out and into a wave, gives me an extreme soreness in my shoulders (of course!!) and arms.... Is this short circuiting any gains from my HIT workout?

Logic says "Yes", but I love surfing - can there be any compromise between these two excersises?

I would like to think that if I wait out the soreness from surfing, and then do my next HIT workout (which could then drag to 9 to 10 days between HIT workouts), I will still get gains as usual... but am I thinking correctly, or deceiving myself here?

If so what would be the best approach to integrate the two into my life?

(Bear in mind good surf seasons don't last - principally Autumn and Spring here...)

Thanks for any help.

Cheers Steve.
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markcwhite

California, USA

Dr. Darden,
I also am looking for advice on cal. intake, I am 6'2" and 225lbs.. I have love handles that I'm trying to get rid of as well (LOL). I started doing the HIT workout last week, and I'm really enjoying it. I have always done multi set workouts in the past, so it is taking some getting used to.

Any advice you have for me would be much appreciated,

PS. Is it a must to start out with the Beginning HIT routine 1, Or could you go straight to the Intermediate HIT 1?

Mark
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Ellington Darden

Mark,

You could probably go either route. It's up to you?

Ellington
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SteveOz

Hi Dr Darden - Just wondering if you had any thoughts on my post above about the surfing in between workouts? (my post is just above the one you most recently answered) - Any help would be great...

Cheers
Steve
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