MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
How Big Is Your Neck?
1 | 2 | 3 | Next | Last
Author
Rating
Options

Ellington Darden, Ph.D.

How Big Is Your Neck?
Going from Dimes to Dollars

No man deserves a neck that looks like a stack of dimes.
If your neck is lagging behind the rest of your body,
do something about it – now.


Get out your tape and stand in front of a mirror. Pass it around the back of your neck and bring it together in the front. Make sure the tape is slightly above, not below, your Adam's apple. Now pull it tight and take a measurement.

"If your neck is less than 15 inches," according to a vintage magazine advertisement, "then you're nowhere close to the powerful, assertive man you could be." Included was a picture of a guy with a strong confident look on his face and a thick full neck.

This photo of Earle Liederman was used with the message
above. Liederman, a professional strongman from the
1920s and 1930s, had a mail-order business that marketed
his bodybuilding books and courses. In his prime,
he weighed 180 pounds and had a 17-inch neck.

I probably saw that ad and photo in a sports magazine at our local newsstand in 1955 . . . because I recall riding my bicycle home, finding my mom's sewing tape, and measuring my neck. It was barely 12 inches in circumference and I weighed 110 pounds. I remember thinking . . . "I want a bigger neck."

The closing part of the magazine promotion said something along the lines of the following:

When you complete this plan . . . Your square shoulders and muscular neck will provide pep in your step, which will make you successful on the athletic field . . . as well as in the business and social world.

At 12 years of age, I didn't care much about the business and social world, but I yearned for success on the athletic field. I didn't have the money at that time to purchase Liederman's plan. A year later, however, a buddy of mine did send for the course, and another kid in our neighborhood ordered the Charles Atlas muscle-building material.

We were all in junior high school, and I can visualize the three of us pouring over the type-written booklets with much interest. One boy, who was skinner than me, kept noticing that Liederman's program eventually required the lifting of barbells and dumbbells – while the Atlas routine could be performed with no special equipment.

Liederman's course made a better impression on me than did the Atlas material. They both contained small instructional pictures within the text, with Liederman and Atlas doing their own modeling. The primary difference between the men was the size of Liederman's neck. It was significantly bigger than Atlas's.

I still remember that in Liederman's progressive routines, his last exercise was called the wrestler's bridge – and there was a small picture of him in an arched position, with only his head and feet touching the floor and a barbell across his chest. That got all of our attentions.

Liederman's muscular neck was calling . . . since each of ours' was thin and resembled a tall stack of dimes.


New Football Coach

Later that same school year, a new football coach was hired in our small town in Texas, and he purchased a dozen barbell sets for the high school football team to use. Four of the barbells were passed down to the junior high school.

Our junior high school coach was a former army drill sergeant. In the spring of the year, he had our team divided into four lines, each behind a loaded barbell. He demonstrated and four of us performed. When an athlete finished doing 8 to 10 reps, he went to the back of the next line, and rotated through.

When we finished all four exercises, another four were demonstrated, and everyone progressed through these in a similar fashion.

We did the squat, straddle lift, pullover, curl, overhead press, deadlift, shoulder shrug, and neck bridge. In all, we did one set of 8-10 repetitions of 8 exercises, and it took an hour for 20 to 25 football players to move through the lines. Everyone, except me, disliked the neck bridge. I wanted a bigger neck, so I did the exercise enthusiastically.


A Growing Neck

That was my first taste, in the spring of 1957, of lifting weights. We continued those twice-a-week workouts for four weeks. After that, I did what I could at home, namely: pushups, chinups, and neck bridges. By the start of the next school year, my neck measured 13 inches and I weighed 120 pounds.

The following year, I saved my money and purchased a 110-pound barbell-dumbbell set and began setting up a gym in one corner of my parents' garage. Several other guys brought their barbells over to my place. I took metal shop in my freshman and sophomore years in high school and constructed more equipment, such as squat racks, bench press racks, lat machine, chinning bar, dip bars, and curling bench. Within six months, I had a nice home gym.

My quest was to get bigger and stronger primarily for football. In my high school, there were only a handful of guys who weighed at least 180 pounds, and there was only two who weighed 200 pounds or more. Both of them were fat. In 1960, a 200-pound high school football player, who was lean and muscular, was rare.


My Goals: 180 Pounds and a 17-Inch Neck

When I entered high school, my goals eventually were to weigh 180 pounds, have a 17-inch neck, and play football well. I had read enough about strength training to know that it would help me reach – and perhaps exceed – those goals. And I included the neck bridge into most of my routines.

My progress was as follows:

Year Body Weight (pounds) Neck Size (inches)
1959, Freshman 138 14.0
1960, Sophomore 155 14.5
1961, Junior 173 15.0
1962, Senior 191 16.5

As you can see from the above listing, my body weight and neck size increases were steady. By my senior year, my body weight was 191 pounds and my neck was 16.5 inches. I was pleased, but not satisfied. I have a long neck, and even at 16.5 inches, it still did not appear to have the fullness that Liederman's had.

There was also an important factor that contributed to a 1.5-inch improvement in my neck size before my senior year. My football coach at that time was Chuck York. York was into strength training and a believer in teaching the technique of using the head and helmet as a blocking and tackling device. Note: this technique is no longer taught. But in those days it was – and you were more successful in this endeavor if you had a big, strong neck.

With Coach York's help, I rigged up a football helmet with a metal pipe welded to a square plate and screwed onto the top of the headgear. I had seen a picture of a similar helmet in IronMan magazine. With a collar, you could then attach small barbell plates securely to the helmet, and exercise the neck progressively in four directions: back, front, left side, and right side.

That proved to be an excellent way to work the neck, much more so than the standard bridging from front to back and side to side.


Baylor Football

A year later, I carried my helmet-neck devise to Baylor University, where I continued to play football and strength train. At Baylor there were a dozen football players who weighed over 200 pounds, but only two of them had really impressive necks.

The first was 6-feet 4-inches tall and weighed 238 pounds. His name was Bobby Crenshaw. He was a giant of a man, who played tackle. His neck had mounds of muscle on the backside that extended to the middle of his head. His neck must have measured at least 20 inches. He lifted weights regularly, but I never saw him do anything other than shoulder shrugs for his neck.

The second football player was Ernie Erickson, who played center and linebacker. Ernie was a good-natured country boy. He stood 6 foot 2 and weighed 218 pounds. Ernie's neck was full in the front and thick on the sides and probably measured 19 inches. I never saw Ernie do any neck exercises, but he told me he had done a lot of bridging in high school.

Overall, if you could have combined Crenshaw's backside development, with Erickson's front and sides, you would have had a 21-inch measurement. Both of those guys' large muscular necks inspired me greatly.

By the time I graduated from Baylor in 1966, I weighed 215 pounds and had a neck that measured a full 18 inches. And over that four-year period, my neck strength tripled in the amount of weight I could handle on my spiked helmet.

My 1966 graduation picture from Baylor University
revealed a bona fide 18-inch neck.

During the mid and late 1960s, I was into bodybuilding and powerlifting competitions – drug-free, I might add. When I entered graduate school at Florida State University in 1968, I continued bodybuilding, but without my helmet-neck devise. I gave my spiked helmet to a friend in Texas.


Jones and Nautilus

When I met Arthur Jones in 1970 and eventually became employed by him (Nautilus) in 1973, I had done no serious neck training during that intervening time. As a result, my neck size had atrophied to 16.75 inches.

In 1974, Jones researched, developed, and began manufacturing the Nautilus Neck machines, which consisted of seven exercises performed on three machines:

Jones was a man after my neck . . . and many other necks. What amazing machines they were. If you've ever had a chance to use all three, back-to-back, then you know what it is to strength train your neck. If not, you simply can't appreciate proper neck work.

In only a short while, even though I then weighed less than 200 pounds, I got my neck up to 17.5 inches.

For at least a dozen years, these three neck machines were an important aspect in whole-body training – especially among many college and professional football players, as well as wrestlers. In my Nautilus books (The Nautilus Book, The Nautilus Woman, The Nautilus Handbook for Young Athletes), which were published in the early 1980s, I recommended that both males and females, young and old, exercise their necks at least once or twice a week.

Unfortunately, the Nautilus Rotary Neck machine went out of production in 1985, and it is rarely seen in use today. But if you can find one, try a set on it. You'll be in for a unique feel. The 4-Way Neck machine is still being manufactured today, and so are versions of the Shoulder Shrug machine.


Dan Riley and the NFL

In my latest book, The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results, chapter 16 is devoted to an interview of Dan Riley. Riley has been a strength-training coach for 25 years; first with Penn State University, then with the Washington Redskins, and now with the Houston Texans.

Riley's number-one, strength-training priority for his NFL players is the neck. The neck is so important that all of Riley's athletes train their necks first. Yes, the initial thing they do when they enter the weight room is to perform five neck exercises: flexion, extension, lateral flexion left, lateral flexion right, and shoulder shrug. There are no exceptions.

In the Texans' facility, there are six Nautilus 4-way neck machines – which are constantly in use, both out of season, and especially in-season.

With a 4-way neck machine (several companies besides Nautilus now manufacture adequate versions), you can work your neck intensely, progressively, and safely . . . without the compression forces that occur with the neck bridge. The 4-way neck machine is a great addition to any HIT routine.

If you don't have access to a neck machine, then you may want to invest in a sturdy neck harness, or even try to find a spiked helmet. I've seen both of them advertised on the Internet.

Dan Riley also describes on the Houston Texans' Web site (www.HoustonTexans.com) how to work with neck manually and with the assistance of a partner. Click into the fitness section and go into the "neck routine." With a little practice, you can get a productive neck workout with hand resistance.

Dan Riley wants all his football players to be fully rested and
to focus intensely on the execution of each repetition of each
neck exercise. As a result, neck work is performed
at the beginning of all routines.


Make a Full Neck a Priority

Throughout the last 30 years, I've consistently worked my neck. Currently, with my 4-way neck machine, I do the front and back movements only, once a week . . . for three consecutive weeks. Then, I do the side contractions once the following week. At a body weight of 186 pounds, such a routine has kept my neck at a respectable 16.25 inches.

While my neck is not in competitive football condition, it is still big enough to provide plenty of pep in my step and success in both the business and social world.

My old friend, Vic Tanny, who I talk about in chapter 19 of The New HIT, used to say: "Nothing sets a man apart from his competition like a full neck."


From Dimes to Dollars

It's time to invest in your neck wisely . . . and . . . turn that weak stack of dimes into solid silver dollars.

 

Discuss this article | Text Version

JJ McClinton

Awesome, article. Anyway we could get a picture of that spiked helmet or link to where you could see one. I have never heard of these. I live in Spokane, Washington and no gyms here have any neck machines, none. Whenever I ask the management why they say because they don't want to be liable for some idiot breaking his neck on one.
Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

Tyler,

Go into the Web site, FractionalPlates.com, and you'll see one version of the spiked helmet.

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

Bill Crawford

Arizona, USA

Great article. I have a Nautilus Plate loaded neck machine from the late 80's that I bought on Ebay. It took a year of looking before I could find one. Check on ebay periodically, and you may find one.

My experience from looking for machines for a whole year is that you'll have better luck on the East of the Mississippi. THe shipping for one of these things is a killer.

My boys play football, and there is no way I would let them play with weak necks.

I ran into the same lawer and insurance driven BS about liability worries when trying to find a neck machine in any of the gyms here in Phoenix.

Lawyers generally make my flesh crawl. And their anti-neck exercise stance confirms in my mind that most lawyers are pencil-neck geeks :)

By frightening all the gyms into dumping their neck machines, lawyers and insurance companies have actually increased the chance that someone gets hurt on the field from a weak neck.

I don't have any data to prove it, but I suspect that many concussions (at least the ones sustained from a hit when the player is still on his feet, as opposed to the head slamming the ground after a tackle) are related to sub-maximum neck strength.

As I understand it, a concussion is produced when the head decelerates (or even changes direction) more rapidly than the brain does. In these cases, the brain hits the skull.

I saw a video of a high school tackler who suffered a pretty bad concussion. The tackler was moving forward and he got hit really hard in the face mask by the runner. The tackler's head snapped backward very fast.

Had the tackler's neck been able to maintain the relative position of his head and body instead of snapping backward, the energy of the blow would have been transmitted to the player's whole body, and the deceleration of the skull ("locked" into its relative position with the body via a very strong neck) would have been much slower.

Don't know if it would have prevented the concussion, but I bet it would have helped.


Thanks,

Mac


BTW: The "head first" method of tackling and blocking is no longer taught in football because that method was correlated with increased rate of catastrophic injuries and deaths. The rule was changed for high school sometime in the 70's and the death rate for football went down substantially.

The death rate was quite low already, but it is now basically non-existant. There are still, unfortunately, some catastrophic injuries.
Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

Also having a bigger, stronger neck could save your life if you drive an automobile.

From what I've read, there are at least 1,000 serious auto accidents each week in the USA . . . and many of them involve a wipelash to the people in the cars.

Usually, in a wipelash situation, you don't have time to react. It just happens. And your head goes one way and your body the other. A bigger, stronger neck may allow you to withstand better such an accident.

If you drive a car or travel in cars, you should train your neck and make it bigger and stronger.

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

Ciccio

Thanks for this motivating article, Ellington!
I'm thinking already long time about getting a neck harness for my home gym to pep up my neck. Now I will!
So far the shrugs worked/are working well but as I have a long neck just like you, the neck flexion/extension may be the missing link.

Regards,

Franco
Open User Options Menu

markandspike

Ellington that photo in 1966 shows you when you were doing high volume between 30-50 sets in a training session (10-15 exercises of 3-5 sets each). Must say you look very good at 215Ibs. How come you dropped down to 193Ibs when doing HIT routines in the 1970's. I know you were more ripped but seems a lot of weight to drop seeing as you were still gaining muscle size using HIT methods.

Mark

Ps
I have some old bodybuilding books from the early 1900's to 1950's will put some of the pages on this web site in a few days when i get time.

Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

Mark,

Bodybuilding standards started changing in the late 1960s from mass to cuts. Thus, if I wanted to compete in the 1970s I had to get leaner -- which I did.

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

JJ McClinton

Was it muscle or fat? If you look at his photos in the 60's he is in very good shape but seems more fleshy. When you look at his photos in 72 after training with Jones he looks very lean, cut, and muscular. Jones always said that most bodybuilders are more fat then muscularly large. I tend to agree. When I use to work out every I got up to 195lbs but some of that was fat. After doing brief intense workouts I am at 183lbs but much more lean, which is what I prefer.
Open User Options Menu

NATUREBOY

Anybody know where to buy a good, yet economical neck harness online?
Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

Tyler,

In that 1966 photo, I had at least 20 pounds of excess fat.

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

ryansergent

Kansas, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
Also having a bigger, stronger neck could save your life if you drive an automobile.

From what I've read, there are at least 1,000 serious auto accidents each week in the USA . . . and many of them involve a wipelash to the people in the cars.

Usually, in a wipelash situation, you don't have time to react. It just happens. And your head goes one way and your body the other. A bigger, stronger neck may allow you to withstand better such an accident.

If you drive a car or travel in cars, you should train your neck and make it bigger and stronger.

Ellington


Agreed. on a very old Drew Baye site he credited his neck exercises in saving him from recieving worse injuries in an automoble accident that he'd been in.

I've always worked my neck(18 inches)and I was hit by a car as a pedestrian years ago in California. My head actually went through the wind shield. tell me a strong neck didn't save my life!

Ryan
Open User Options Menu

ZEZ

Dr. Darden, i have 3 questions.
1.)In your opinion, what is the best exercise that hits the neck indirectly other then shrugs?
2.)Can you achieve similiar results with a harness if you don't have access to a 4 way neck machine?
2.) Can doing neck work help with a double chin?
Thanks in advance.
Open User Options Menu

JBRINK

DR DARDEN,

HOW CAN I FIND MORE INFO ON DAN RILEY. I OWN A GYM/PERSONAL TRAINING STUDIO WHERE MOST OF MY TRAINERS (MYSELF INCLUDED) USE H.I.T. WITH OUR CLIENTS WITH GREAT SUCCESS. I ALSO WORK AS A VOLUNTEER STRENGTH AND CONDITIONING COACH FOR MANY OF THE LOCAL HIGH SCHOOLS THAT DO HAVE THE FUNDS TO HIRE S&C COACHES. I AM SLOWLY BEGINNING TO BREAK DOWN THE "MAINLINE" EXPLOSIVE REPS FOR EXPLOSIVE ATHLETIC SPEED IN THE COACHES (AND MYSELF). DO YOU HAVE ANY SUGGESTIONS FOR FINDING INFO FOR HIT AND FOOTBALL. THANK YOU.
Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

Zez,

Indirect neck work: all upper-body exercises involve the neck somewhat, but shrugs are the best.

A neck harness is okay. Of the four positions (front, back, right side, left side) a harness hits the back best.

Sure, neck work can help a double chin.

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

JBrink,

Dan Riley has a lot of information that is available through the Houston Texans Web site. See the listing within the article.

Any form of explosive reps for football is a mistake. Next week, I'm posting an article on Fast-Twitch and Slow-Twitch Muscle Fibers that explains why. Look for it.

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

logicbdj

Ontario, CAN

I own a Nautilus Time Machine rotary neck (INFImetric), serial number 267. It was owned originally by John Turner, who some of you may know. He sold it to a professional football player (CFL), who then sold it to me.

I'll be purchasing either a MedX or Nautilus 2ST 4-way neck soon, since I'm doing a lot more rehab work. I used to train my neck by way of a neck harness, either attached to weights or a pulley system; it produced more problems than anything. Even when training slowly I received some injuries... nothing serious, but almost like compressional pain and discomfort. The angle of pull is not ideal, I find, with such devices and I recommend a person be very careful when training the neck in that manner.
Open User Options Menu

JBRINK

Dr. Darden

Thank you for your quick reply. I need to correct my earlier post, I volunteer for schools that do "not" have money for S&C coaches, not that "do" have money; we all have to work to help our kids learn safe and effective ways to exercise.
Open User Options Menu

markandspike

DEVELOPING THE NECK by Matt Brzycki, CSCS
At one time or another, almost everyone has been asked to make a muscle or flex. In response to this challenge, how many of you would open up your shirt collars and flex your neck?
Because the neck is not a "show" muscle -- like the biceps and triceps -- neck exercises are typically de-emphasized or neglected altogether. Yet, having a well-developed neck is necessary for achieving a complete and appealing physique. In addition, a strong, thickly-muscled neck is extremely important in protecting the cervical area from traumatic injury in contact sports such as football, wrestling, boxing, rugby, soccer and judo.

Basic Anatomy and Muscular Function
Regardless of the length of the neck, all mammals -- with the exception of several species of sloth?s -- have exactly seven cervical vertebrae. Even a giraffe has seven cervical vertebrae -- although each vertebra of the giraffe is about as long as your leg bone! (In a bizarre twist of fate, a sparrow has more cervical vertebrae than a giraffe!) In humans, the primary muscles of the neck -- the sternocleidomastoideus and the trapezius -- provide support and act to produce a variety of different movements.

The sternocleidomastoideus has two parts or "heads" located on each side of the neck that start behind the ears and run down to the sternum (breastbone) and clavicles (collarbones). When both sides contract at the same time, the sternocleidomastoideus flexes the head toward the chest; when one side acts singly, it brings the head laterally toward the shoulder or rotates the head to the side.

The trapezius is a kite-shaped muscle that covers the uppermost region of your back and the posterior section of your neck. The primary functions of your "traps" are to elevate your shoulders (as in shrugging), to adduct your scapulae (pinch your shoulder blades together) and to extend your head backward.

So, these two muscles act upon the neck in seven different ways: flexion of the head forward, extension of the head backward, lateral flexion of the head to the left and the right, rotation of the head to the left and the right and elevation of the shoulders. In order to develop the neck properly, exercises should be prescribed for as many of the various functions as possible.

General Guidelines
The following general guidelines apply when training the neck musculature:

1. Exercise your neck at the beginning of your workout. It's important to focus your full attention on performing exercises for your cervical area. Far too often, the neck is exercised at the end of a workout almost as an afterthought. Instead, you should exercise your neck at the beginning of your workout while you're fresh -- both physically as well as psychologically.

2. Perform all exercises in good form. Good form is raising the weight without the use of momentum in about 1 - 2 seconds, pausing distinctly in the contracted (or mid-range) position and lowering the weight under control in about 3 - 4 seconds. This will ensure that the targeted muscles are raising the weight (rather than momentum) and that your chances of incurring an injury while strength training are minimized.

3. Execute each repetition throughout a full range of motion. Each repetition should be performed from a position of full stretch to a position of full muscular contraction and back to a position of full stretch. Exercising throughout a full range of motion will allow you to maintain (or perhaps improve) your flexibility, which reduces your potential for injury. Furthermore, it ensures that you're exercising your entire muscle -- not just a portion of it.

4. Reach concentric muscular failure between 8 - 12 reps (or 40 - 70 seconds). Concentric muscular failure is when you've exhausted the muscle to a point where you literally cannot raise the weight for another repetition. Performing sets of less than 8 reps significantly increases your risk of injury. Likewise, if you exceed 12 repetitions, the set becomes a test of endurance rather than strength.

Exercises
The following is a specific description of various exercises which can be performed to strengthen the muscles of your neck using conventional equipment. Unfortunately, it's rare to find a device nowadays to exercise the rotary movement of the neck is rare. Therefore, neck rotation will not be described. However, one side of your sternocleidomastoideus can still be used singly by performing neck lateral flexion.

1. Neck extension. This exercise works your sternocleidomastoideus (both sides acting together). It is most often performed using machines (selectorized and plate-loading) or manual resistance. If you're using a machine, adjust the seat so that your face is centered on the head pads when you are sitting upright. Place your feet flat on the floor, grasp the handles and bend your head backward.

If you're using manual resistance, lie supine on a bench, place your feet flat on the floor and position yourself so that your head hangs over the edge. Interlock your fingers and place them across your chest. To do the movement, bring your head as close to your chest as possible during the mid-range of each repetition. Pause briefly in this position and then lower your head under control back to the starting position at the completion of each rep to ensure a proper stretch.

2. Neck flexion. This movement targets your trapezius and neck extensors. It's usually performed using machines (selectorized and plate-loading) or manual resistance. If you're using a machine, adjust the seat so that the back of your head is centered on the head pads when you are sitting upright. Place your feet flat on the floor, grasp the handles and bend your head forward. If you're using manual resistance, lie prone on a bench and position yourself so that your head hangs over the edge. Place your hands and feet on the floor (or position your legs across the edge).

To start the exercise, extend your head backward as far as possible during the mid-range of each repetition. Pause briefly in this position and then return your head back to the starting position at the completion of each rep to obtain a proper stretch.

3. Neck lateral flexion. Your sternocleidomastoideus (one side acting singly) is utilized during this movement. This exercise is most often done using machines (selectorized and plate-loading). Adjust the seat so that one side of your face is centered on the head pads when you are sitting upright. Place your feet flat on the floor, grasp the handles and bend your head to the side opposite that of the pad.

Without moving your upper torso, bring your head as close to the other shoulder as possible during the mid-range of each repetition. Pause briefly in this position and then return your head back to the starting position at the completion of each rep to provide a proper stretch. After performing a set with one side of your neck, repeat the exercise for the other side of your neck.

4. Shoulder shrug. This is the best exercise for isolating your trapezius muscle. It can be performed with a barbell, dumbbells, trap bar or machines (selectorized and plate-loading). Use an alternating grip or a grip with both palms facing backward when using a barbell use a parallel grip with other equipment.

To begin the movement, keep your arms and legs straight and pull the resistance up as high as possible trying to touch your shoulders to your ears (as if to say, "I don't know") during the mid-range of each repetition. Pause briefly in this position and then lower the weight back to the starting position at the completion of each rep to ensure a proper stretch. Avoid throwing the resistance by using your legs or by swinging your upper torso back and forth -- movement should only occur around your shoulder. Finally, don't roll your shoulders as you perform this exercise.

Hope you enjoy and learn something from this article.
Mark
Open User Options Menu

ZEZ

logicbdj wrote:

I'll be purchasing either a MedX or Nautilus 2ST 4-way neck soon, since I'm doing a lot more rehab work. I used to train my neck by way of a neck harness, either attached to weights or a pulley system; it produced more problems than anything. Even when training slowly I received some injuries... nothing serious, but almost like compressional pain and discomfort. The angle of pull is not ideal, I find, with such devices and I recommend a person be very careful when training the neck in that manner.


Yes Brian, i know what you mean. I used to use a harness attached to a pully, and every time i did, the next day i would wake up to a very bad headache. I rarely ever get headaches, so after a few times of this, i knew i had to discarded this exercise. My old gym had a 4-way neck machine, which i used quite often. Sadly my current gym doesn't.

Open User Options Menu

AceHIT

My old gym had a Nuatilus 2ST 4 way neck machine.

It was the least used piece of equipment in the facility. In fact, I'm the only one who ever used it.

Once I asked an instructor to teach me how to use it. He looked at me in a puzzled manner and asked, "Why the hell would you want to build neck muscles anyway?"

And then people wonder why I'm so anti-"fitness" industry.

Open User Options Menu

markandspike

Diagram of the neck muscles.

Mark
Open User Options Menu

markandspike

Neck bridge from the Liederman's Course.
Open User Options Menu

markandspike

Liederman's Stat's
Open User Options Menu

Feb221732

Dr. Darden,

Please post that article on fast and slow twitch fibers. I have asked you questions about this issue in the past and talked about misunderstandings I encounter when talking to trainees and my friends. I Will be enthusiastically waiting for that article!

Ted
Open User Options Menu
1 | 2 | 3 | Next | Last
Administrators Online: Mod Phoenix
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy