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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Treasure Trove of Old HIT Books
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tompuderbaugh

Hi gang,

Was cleaning out a closet and found a treasure trove of old (long-since out of print) HIT books from years ago. Forgot I even had them.

I was going to list them on Ebay, but before I do (knowing that many of you have collections of such things) I thought I'd give someone a chance to grab them directly.

Six in total (all in near mint or very good condition, considering their age).

Four by Mike Mentzer and two by Ellington Darden PhD.

$110 FOR ALL, including shipping anywhere in the U.S. MUST TAKE ALL SIX.

1. The original Mike Mentzer Heavy Duty training manual/system. (The one with him doing the waist-up most muscular pose on the cover.) More booklet size than a true full size book. 35+ years old. Very collectible.

2. Mike Mentzer Heavy Duty II. Mind and Body. Copyright 1996.

3. High-Intensity Training the Mike Mentzer Way by Mike Mentzer and John Little. Copyright 2003.

4. The Wisdom of Mike Mentzer. The art, science and philosophy of a bodybuilding legend by Mike Mentzer and Joanne Sharkey. Copyright 2006.

5. The Nautilus Bodybuilding Book (the original one with Joe Means on the cover) by Ellington Darden. Copyright 1982.

6. Massive Muscles in 10 Weeks by Ellington Darden. Copyright 1987.

Again, must take all. Personal Check only.

Send me a Private Message via this site and I'll get you my mailing address.

Good training to all!

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Nwlifter

Surprised you dont' want to keep those, I have all those but the nautilus book and about a million other BB-ing books (HIT, and everything else), kinda like a treasured collection to me :)
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HeavyHitter32

Yeah, there is A LOT of nostalgia there even if you don't train by them.
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Nwlifter

i agree, I have a ton of books...
Just counted, wow 58 actual print books related to muscle/lifting, egads!

Power factor training
Power a Scientific Approach
Bodybuilding a Scientific Approach
Strength training anatomy
Body by Science
HD II Mind and Body
High Intensity Training
Strength and Power in Sport
Keys to progress
anabolic muscle mass
cuts
mass
reps
muscle blasting
stack it
raw muscle
more muscle
home gym handbook
Best of Weiders muscle and fitness
Unleasing the wild physique
freestyle bodybuilding
Physiology of sport and exercise
Maximize your training
Neuromechanics of human movement
The weider system
Golds gym mass building
Get buffed
Static contraction training
Nautilus north study (printed)
Critical mass
Underground mass boosting methods
supertraining
get the pump
muscle now
bigger muscles in 42 days
big
high intensity bodybuilding
massive muscles in 10 weeks
super high intensity bodybuilding
Grow
Bodybuilding's best kept secrets
New high intensity bodybuilding
The wisdom of mike mentzer
High intensity training the Mike menzter way
HD 1
Rock hard
Serious strength training
Science and development of Muscle hypertrophy
New bodybuilding for old school results
the New high intensity training
supersquats
Brawn
Beyond brawn
Size surge
Big arms
Big bench
Blood and guts
Compound aftershock
Plus a bunch of e-books
Gironda book
BB for dumbells
Big beyond belief
Fortitude
High density training
Ultimate mass
Trainsmart
Xmass
Xtrordinary 4x mass
Xtrodinary size surge
Plus a few more I bet








How's that for a collection lol

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Crotalus

Never had Mentzer's books but had all of Darden's ... until I lent them to someone who I was trying to convince of HIT .... and never saw the books again.

The one book I'd consider buying again just to have it is High Intensity Bodybuilding . That was my first look at HIT and the way that book was written and illustrated got me hook, line and sinker ! The workout descriptions of Platz, Sergio and Casey were so inspirational you couldn't wait for your next workout.
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Nwlifter

I agree, me too, that was one of my first hit books. My very first was super high intensity bodybuilding, those two books were super inspirational and written very well.


Crotalus wrote:
Never had Mentzer's books but had all of Darden's ... until I lent them to someone who I was trying to convince of HIT .... and never saw the books again.

The one book I'd consider buying again just to have it is High Intensity Bodybuilding . That was my first look at HIT and the way that book was written and illustrated got me hook, line and sinker ! The workout descriptions of Platz, Sergio and Casey were so inspirational you couldn't wait for your next workout.


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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
At one point I got tired of all this muscles stuff and at a yard sale I got rid of a bunch of my musclee books and magazines. I've regretted it ever since.
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HeavyHitter32

My very first HIT book was "100 high Intensity Ways..." purchased at B Dalton Bookstore at a mall (anyone remember those stores?) in 1992. I had gone to the bookstore several times reading excepts before finally purchasing it. I remember finding it hard to believe at first that one set of anything could work at all, but the concept of intensity and the logic of recovery clicked for me. I still have it although it's in terrible condition and missing pages. I'm going to probably order a used copy on Amazon one of these days just to have. Amazon has a lot of used Darden books at good prices by the way. I have a lot of the Darden books around that era including a couple of editions of the earlier Nautilus books as well as the Mentzer books from the 90s. A scientific approach to bodybuilding by Hatfield I also own as well as some IART books from the 1990s and all three Zone training books.
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HeavyHitter32

entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
At one point I got tired of all this muscles stuff and at a yard sale I got rid of a bunch of my musclee books and magazines. I've regretted it ever since.


I had most of the Iron Man magazines from around 1990 (when I started training) to 1993 that I sold at a garage sale bought by a guy that was literally a 90 pound weakling. Maybe he's huge now, ha. I do miss them and wish I never sold them though. It was also where I first learned of Mike Mentzer with the 3 part interview series they were doing and eventually gave him a call as a result.
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Nwlifter

Bummer!
For me now, many are just a trip down memory lane, I remember when I got them, the excitement of thinking 'This will be the one' LOL, but still great memories, so re-read them all the time, or just flip through them.


entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
At one point I got tired of all this muscles stuff and at a yard sale I got rid of a bunch of my musclee books and magazines. I've regretted it ever since.


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Crotalus

Nwlifter wrote:

I agree, me too, that was one of my first hit books. My very first was super high intensity bodybuilding, those two books were super inspirational and written very well.



Yeah, I remember seeing the book in a Waldens Bookstore while looking through a bunch of other BB books. I opened to that first picture of Platz holding the lockout of a Negative Only Press Behind the Neck with 315 and nearly shit ! What a way to start off the book !!

I started reading the account of how Tom was doing a breakdown set as his spotters removed plates and helped back up with the next positive rep.

The way it was written along with the photos illustrating it completely captivated me and I almost sprinted to the checkout with it, lol,

Nobody could describe a workout like Darden !
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Bastion

Nwlifter wrote:
i agree, I have a ton of books...
Just counted, wow 58 actual print books related to muscle/lifting, egads!

Power factor training
Power a Scientific Approach
Bodybuilding a Scientific Approach
Strength training anatomy
Body by Science
HD II Mind and Body
High Intensity Training
Strength and Power in Sport
Keys to progress
anabolic muscle mass
cuts
mass
reps
muscle blasting
stack it
raw muscle
more muscle
home gym handbook
Best of Weiders muscle and fitness
Unleasing the wild physique
freestyle bodybuilding
Physiology of sport and exercise
Maximize your training
Neuromechanics of human movement
The weider system
Golds gym mass building
Get buffed
Static contraction training
Nautilus north study (printed)
Critical mass
Underground mass boosting methods
supertraining
get the pump
muscle now
bigger muscles in 42 days
big
high intensity bodybuilding
massive muscles in 10 weeks
super high intensity bodybuilding
Grow
Bodybuilding's best kept secrets
New high intensity bodybuilding
The wisdom of mike mentzer
High intensity training the Mike menzter way
HD 1
Rock hard
Serious strength training
Science and development of Muscle hypertrophy
New bodybuilding for old school results
the New high intensity training
supersquats
Brawn
Beyond brawn
Size surge
Big arms
Big bench
Blood and guts
Compound aftershock
Plus a bunch of e-books
Gironda book
BB for dumbells
Big beyond belief
Fortitude
High density training
Ultimate mass
Trainsmart
Xmass
Xtrordinary 4x mass
Xtrodinary size surge
Plus a few more I bet








How's that for a collection lol


NWLIFTER, that is one heck of a collection! . You've opened up a can of worms lol. I just had to go digging through my collection. Btw, in the Gold's gym mass building book, if its the one with the blue cover and milos sarcev doing tricep pressdowns, there's a basic heavy duty 1 type of routine that I used back in the day to attain my best size and shape on page 64.
My collection. Which doesn't include dozens of e books and dvds.

Heavy duty
Heavy duty 1992
Heavy duty 2 mind and body
HIT the Mike menzter way
Muscles in minutes
The wisdom of mike mentzer
Mike mentzer 4 part audio cassette series.
Mike mentzer muscle media 2000 cassette interview.
Training for mass
Mr America's shape up series
Physique 101
Ironman ecyclopedia of bodybuilding
Golds gym ecyclopedia of bodybuilding
Golds gym mass building
Training and eating the Gironda way
Super natural strength
Operation morpheus
Super squats
Brawn
Beyond brawn
Weight training technique
Potential
Ultimate exercise bulletin 1
Body by Science
The steel tip collection
Static contraction training
Bodybuilding the weider approach
Gold's gym training encyclopedia
A warriors story
Big
Bigger muscles in 42 days
Moment arm exercise
The 7 min rotator cuff solution
8 copies of Hardgainer magazine
Power factor training



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Bastion

Nwlifter wrote:
Bummer!
For me now, many are just a trip down memory lane, I remember when I got them, the excitement of thinking 'This will be the one' LOL, but still great memories, so re-read them all the time, or just flip through them.


entsminger wrote:
==Scott==
At one point I got tired of all this muscles stuff and at a yard sale I got rid of a bunch of my musclee books and magazines. I've regretted it ever since.



Nwlifter, do you have the fortitude training book? What's your take on fortitude training? . It looks like it would put me flat on my face after a few weeks, although I don't know much about it beyond the loading and pumping days .
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Ellington Darden

I know this sounds kind of weird, but sometimes I go through my large bodybuilding books from the 1980s and 1990s and those Chris Lund photos, and some of my own stories, re-inspire me to train a little harder.

Thank you guys for keeping the interest in HIT alive.

Ellington
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entsminger

Virginia, USA

==Scott==
Fortunately I did keep a ton of muscle magazines and books. I've got shelves of Iron man, Muscle Fitness, Muscular development , Muscle Mag etc etc and just like my many Nautilus machines I wouldn't part with them for the world now.Through out the years I never really gained any appreciable muscle but just being a small part of the hey day of Nautilus, Darden, Jones etc etc is something I will always treasure.Like classic rock of the 60's and 70's those days of Jones, Nautilus , Sergio, Zane, Viator Mentzer etc will forever be the classic days of muscle building. What goes on now in the bodybuilding world is just like the music put out today ,garbage!!
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Dan_The_man

Of the HIT books it's often a case of once you've read one you've read them all. It's the pictures that stand out in some of them for me, not the training propaganda.
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Nwlifter

Bastion- Hey you have a good dose of books too, cool!
Man I have to look at that book again, I have a vague memory if it being SO much more than I'd ever attempt to even try, so I think your assessment agrees with my thoughts on it.





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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Dan_The_man wrote:
Of the HIT books it's often a case of once you've read one you've read them all. It's the pictures that stand out in some of them for me, not the training propaganda.


==Scott==
When Jones was in the thick of it that was great, I couldn't wait until the next story but after that it became the same old crap 90% of which was BS.Yea,sadly enough like playboy it really was about the pictures.
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Nwlifter

Ellington Darden wrote:
I know this sounds kind of weird, but sometimes I go through my large bodybuilding books from the 1980s and 1990s and those Chris Lund photos, and some of my own stories, re-inspire me to train a little harder.

Thank you guys for keeping the interest in HIT alive.

Ellington


Sounds good to me! that's what I do. I keep a few books on my end table next to me, to read when it's quiet (re-read and re-read again), I always have one of your books in that area. Right now, re-reading Bodybuilding for Old School. I agree, those photos and they way you write makes me have that excitement to train just like it did the first time I read them many years ago.

Thank you for keeping this forum going, and even participating. Back when I first read your books, I never thought I'd actually get to communicate with Ellington Darden, it's still very cool to me!

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Nwlifter

HIT's not propaganda, it's merely a forum of training, like one other, that requires really proper execution.

IMO, there are 2 main ways to train, with 3 basic forms.
The two main paths are
1) Just lift the weight and be progressive
2) Get really good at making the muscle work, focus on, and learn to contract the muscles.

The 3 basic forms are
1) Multi-set bouts of repeated lifts
2) Multi-set bouts of focused muscle work (proper CFT)
3) HIT

People have grown well with all 3, but number 1 is the easy one, heavy weights, just keep doing sets until eventually the muscles are stimulated.

People fail with 2 and 3 many times as they use the technique of number 1 on those last two which won't work. HIT nor things like Gironda's methods just won't work well if you 'just lift the weight'. A little area that Darden talks about, that would be great if it were drilled in more, is where he says 'relax your face' and not let your whole body become involved. It's too easy to give into the temptation to go to 'exercise failure', or 'effort failure', rather than 'muscular failure'. It's also important to use the tools. HIT is not about using the least volume possible, it's about using the least volume NEEDED to get the job done. Look at specialization routines with HIT, there IS an increase in volume, but it's a little more of proper application, not just banging away at many more 'lifts'. One powerlifting type set to failure is very different than a focused controlled set to failure, .....if the person is letting the target muscles actually do the work.

That's what I've seen and experienced anyway.

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Dan_The_man

entsminger wrote:
Dan_The_man wrote:
Of the HIT books it's often a case of once you've read one you've read them all. It's the pictures that stand out in some of them for me, not the training propaganda.

==Scott==
When Jones was in the thick of it that was great, I couldn't wait until the next story but after that it became the same old crap 90% of which was BS.Yea,sadly enough like playboy it really was about the pictures.


Haha hilarious. Apart from that Arnie Enclopedia I find those hall of fame pictures hideous. It's all about the in training photos for me.
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Dan_The_man

It's propaganda when all other modalities are binned as useless. Which in general in any HIT orientated book anything else is deemed as a waste of time. Mentzer took this to the nth degree, some authors took it to the point that if you did any other exercise such as cycling you'd hamper your results. Train once every 7 days the rest of the time lock yourself up in a room. How ridiculous.

It has its uses yes, but it's not the end all and be all. Credit to Dr Darden he's got some good results with clients, but most people do better under good direction with a poor method than a good method with no direction.

I see it all the time in the gym. Different PT's with different clients and all seem to respond positively to a vast array of various training methods they are put through from hanging upside down on rubber bands to playing catch with a medicine ball. It's clear to me that a person's focus, intent or will is more potent when there's someone who acts as an authority. Then there's some of us who just don't like authority...

Hit makes a good default method. I doubt it's the worst, but I've gotten a lot of good results training in a different way.
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Nwlifter

Oh for sure, yes, but IMO, that's not HIT's philosophy, that's just some authors zealot opinions (that it's the only way to train), what I read from intelligent authors, is that one can replicate, with HIT, what one does with other methods, but just more efficiently.

I see things like this...
To me, blaming a method (like HIT, or any method really) for not working, is like blaming a hammer for not putting the nail in straight. Use the right hammer and use the hammer right.

People will match a method to how they train, instead of training to that method.

If HIT flat out didn't work, then logically, zero people would have gained with it.

Dan_The_man wrote:
It's propaganda when all other modalities are binned as useless. Which in general in any HIT orientated book anything else is deemed as a waste of time. Mentzer took this to the nth degree, some authors took it to the point that if you did any other exercise such as cycling you'd hamper your results. Train once every 7 days the rest of the time lock yourself up in a room. How ridiculous.

It has its uses yes, but it's not the end all and be all. Credit to Dr Darden he's got some good results with clients, but most people do better under good direction with a poor method than a good method with no direction.

I see it all the time in the gym. Different PT's with different clients and all seem to respond positively to a vast array of various training methods they are put through from hanging upside down on rubber bands to playing catch with a medicine ball. It's clear to me that a person's focus, intent or will is more potent when there's someone who acts as an authority. Then there's some of us who just don't like authority...

Hit makes a good default method. I doubt it's the worst, but I've gotten a lot of good results training in a different way.


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entsminger

Virginia, USA

Dan_The_man wrote:
entsminger wrote:
Dan_The_man wrote:
Of the HIT books it's often a case of once you've read one you've read them all. It's the pictures that stand out in some of them for me, not the training propaganda.

==Scott==
When Jones was in the thick of it that was great, I couldn't wait until the next story but after that it became the same old crap 90% of which was BS.Yea,sadly enough like playboy it really was about the pictures.

Haha hilarious. Apart from that Arnie Enclopedia I find those hall of fame pictures hideous. It's all about the in training photos for me.


--Scott---
Yes the training pictures of Arnold and Draper and Columbo or Viator were the best but the so called routines they were supposed to be doing were a joke. They most likely did nothing like was advertised. Every issue had some hulk doing a different routine. They had to fill the pages with something . Just think how many muscle magazines that have been printed over the last 40 years. Each one had some grand new routine or method to push. Now do you think there's a fig of a difference in most of those 6 zillion different routines, ha ha .
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tompuderbaugh

Hi gang,

Thanks for all the interesting postings.

But is anyone actually interested in my books?

They go on eBay on Monday. So don't dilly-dally.

Good training to all!
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