MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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NEW! Negative-Accentuated Machines
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NewYorker

New York, USA

They look like great machines. Too bad we have to wait till December before they even start becoming available here.

I wonder if the home machine would fit in a 7 foot ceiling basement.

It is good to see a fresh innovation, like this.

Hope it works out and they expand their line to include lowback, abd/add, neck, calf, hip machines etc.

I've worked out on Keiser machines, where you can module the hydraulic resistance, and they are surprisingly good. But what one thing that is better IMO about these new machines is it removes the thinking/guess work.
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Duke Matisse

Here's a clip showing the shoulder press:

Perhaps someone could post it.

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=UAcZW9wHa6I
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Ellington Darden

Bjorn Alber, who discusses X-Force in the above you-tube video clip, is both an MD and a PhD. He practices in Stockholm, Sweden, and is very knowledgeable. He's been involved with Mats Thulin for more than two decades.

Ellington
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Charles Coulter

New York, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
If you stop anywhere along the positive phase -- for as long as
1 second -- the machine reads that as you are finished. Automatically, in 1/2 second, it changes to the negative phase.

Ellington


Just curious, how much of "shock' is it when pushing to failure (pausing a second) and suddenly you have 40% more resistance coming back down at you?

The machines sound quite interesting and would love to try them out.

Thanks in advance.
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Ellington Darden

Charles,

When the weight stack turns, there's a small amount of "slippage" that smoothes the shock that you are referring to. It's remarkable because you feel the 40-percent overload on the negative, but the transition is gradual -- not sudden.

Ellington
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

What will the price be per machine in US dollars?

Michael
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txiron

Dr. Darden,

Are you going to be conducting any human trails using these new machines?

As always, thanks for making yourself so accessable.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Considering how easy it is for some people to max out many of the Nautilus Nitro and MedX machines doing regular repetitions, I'm wondering if the stacks will be heavy enough to provide meaningful resistance during the negative for stronger users?

How heavy will the weight stacks be and how far will the stack travel vertically during the negative over a typical ROM? (max negative ft/lbs work?)
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Ellington Darden

Michael Petrella wrote:
What will the price be per machine in US dollars?

Michael


The machines will not be available for US distribution until 2010. And at that time, since they will be manufactured in Sweden, the transporting fees to get them to the US is going to be high. Thus, each machine is going to run in the neighborhood of $10,000. Over the next year, if a deal is worked out with a US manufacturer, then that will reduce the cost per machine significantly.

I will tell you this, each time I try X-Force I marvel at the smoothness of the tilting mechanisms and the overall engineering of this product. Even at $10,000 per machine, it is worth every dollar.

Ellington

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Ellington Darden

txiron wrote:
Dr. Darden,

Are you going to be conducting any human trails using these new machines?

As always, thanks for making yourself so accessable.


Six months ago, the plan was -- after IHRSA -- to send a set of X-Force machines to Florida, a set to the NY or PA, and leave a set in California. Thus, they could be tried, tested, and researched at those locations. But the necessary "certifications" to leave them in the US fell through the cracks. Now, they must all go back to Sweden for at least six months.

Ellington

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theHITman

Just a quick thing that sprung to mind.

I don't know how the mechanism is put together, but can you turn off the tilting mechanism, so the machine works as both a Neg-Accentuated, and just a normal machine?
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Ellington Darden

Drew Baye wrote:
Considering how easy it is for some people to max out many of the Nautilus Nitro and MedX machines doing regular repetitions, I'm wondering if the stacks will be heavy enough to provide meaningful resistance during the negative for stronger users?

How heavy will the weight stacks be and how far will the stack travel vertically during the negative over a typical ROM? (max negative ft/lbs work?)


The weight stacks vary between 360 and 600 pounds. From my observations, each weight stack moves approximately 12 inches with each stroke. Interestingly, in talking with the X-Force engineers, if a trainee did max-out on a machine, it's possible to make several adjustments to the gearing. Doing that correctly adds the equivalent of an extra 100 to 200 pounds of resistance to that machine.

Ellington

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Ellington Darden

theHITman wrote:
Just a quick thing that sprung to mind.

I don't know how the mechanism is put together, but can you turn off the tilting mechanism, so the machine works as both a Neg-Accentuated, and just a normal machine?


The production model of X-Force will have a lever that turns off the tilting mechanism. So after it is turned off, the machine functions in a non-tilting manner.

Ellington

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Ellington Darden

I took several hundred digital photos at the IHRSA show. Unfortunately, a friend mistakenly picked up a bag that had my camera in it, and took it with him. He's mailing the camera back to me and I should have it tomorrow or Tuesday.

As soon as I get it, I'll post many of the photos on a new thread.

In the meantime, interested people should go the X-Force Web site:
x-force.se. Go into "Media centre" at the top of the page and you'll have access to all the brochures that were available at the IHRSA show.

Ellington
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admnautilus

Washington, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
Drew Baye wrote:
Considering how easy it is for some people to max out many of the Nautilus Nitro and MedX machines doing regular repetitions, I'm wondering if the stacks will be heavy enough to provide meaningful resistance during the negative for stronger users?

How heavy will the weight stacks be and how far will the stack travel vertically during the negative over a typical ROM? (max negative ft/lbs work?)

The weight stacks vary between 360 and 600 pounds. From my observations, each weight stack moves approximately 12 inches with each stroke.

Interestingly, in talking with the X-Force engineers, if a trainee did max-out on a machine, it's possible to make several adjustments to the gearing. Doing that correctly adds the equivalent of an extra 100 to 200 pounds of resistance to that machine.

Ellington


This is a good question since alot of those that are on this site have been training for many years and are quite strong. Luke and worked out on 13 of the 14 pieces and all but the leg press had plenty of weight. As Dr.Darden said though X-Force can regear the machines for more resistance.

It can be frustrating to have a great movement and not enough resistance. Mats Thulin (owner of X-FORCE)I believe would understand this very well
since he has surely delt with it at his 127 clubs. In fact this is probably why X-FORCE felt so well sorted right out of the gate. Jeff


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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

That's good. It was frustrating to have to pile up add on plates on the Nitro machines or have people climb up and stand on the MedX weight stacks (although that was very humorous to watch).

Is there a way to set the tilt even further so that negative-only training might be easier? A lighter positive might make negative only a little easier on the helpers, but an even greater tilt might make negative-only a little more practical.
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Vince Basile

Ingenious invention for sure and one that Arthur would have applauded.

I have used linear bearings in my gym equipment since 1982 so I know how little friction is involved with them. The mechanism is sophisticated because you have to dampen the weight stack as it becomes vertical. From looking at the video I congratulate the engineers on a masterpiece because it is smooth and functional. I can only imagine the work that went into perfecting this mechanism.

By the way, I have had to work out resistances in 40 degree and up to 60 degree leg presses and Hack machines. At 45 degrees the resistance is 71% of the vertical load. The square root of 2 divided into 1. Thus, if you select 100 pounds on the weight stack it will feel like 71.43 pounds to lift.

On the XForce machines the 100 pounds on the weight stack will feel like 71.43 pounds to lift up but 100 pounds to lower. This is easier to understand than the 40% more way of looking at what you are lowering.

The electric Life Fitness machines were impressive because users could select negative loads and these were very easy to use and also effective. I always wanted those machines in my gym but they were expensive to import.

It isn't often we see real innovation in this industry. Looking at the complexity of these machines it is easy to see why. The inventor clearly saw a need and set about finding a solution that worked. I salute him!

My only real innovation was designing and building a biceps-supinator machine. I have one in my gym. There are no plans to build any more.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Unless they can manufacture them here, the cost seems really prohibitive considering each machine only provides a single exercise.
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Drew Baye wrote:
Unless they can manufacture them here, the cost seems really prohibitive considering each machine only provides a single exercise.


Any chance there is a multi unit that could use one weight stack? I could see that doing very well here in personal training studio's. Much like the old pendulum unit.

Can't wait to see the pictures. The youtube video looked good. The turn arounds looked like they would work nicely.

If you have invested interest in this Dr. Darden, I wish you the best of luck.

Michael
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overfiftylifter

I think I am in the same camp as Mr. Petrella but will take it one step further.

Building some type of home unit with the unique weight system with resistance that could be used in a multi-gym device could probably be built in North America at a affordable price and if successful, spread into more single modular units with local manufacture.

The use of pre-post studies(pictures are good for marketing)with a book perhaps authored by someone like Dr. Darden who has some publishing connections could start a ground swell to develop a sales base.

A proper promotional base with the right testimonials(celebrities of the moment) /publications/unique design from the land of Volvo/Saab could create a demand that would possibly force a regeneration of health centers like the old Nautilus gyms or at least put pressure on the fitness industry to add the equipment to existing facilities.

I would market to many demographics, not just the small HIT pundits. If the machines are as smooth as mentioned, the marketing would be applied to the baby boomers, seniors, women's(the barbell for bikini's-sorry)and athletes(what is Butkus doing these days).

Overfiftylifter-some "eccentric" thoughts.
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LukeCarlson

I was at the IHRSA show and and trained to failure with multiple forced reps on every X-force piece.

We did one set of 6-10 reps of the following: Lateral Raise, Shoulder Press, Pullover, Chest Fy, Pull-down, Incline Press, Seated Row, Chest Press, Biceps, Triceps, Prone Leg Curl, Leg Extension, Leg Press, and Abdominal. We used a 2/4 count on each rep. Here are a few comments:


1. The weight stacks are plenty heavy (except for leg press). I trained with a co-worker, a 270 pound guy who is incredibly strong (can perform 10 strict reps with the entire MedX Leg Extension stack) and he wasn't capable of using more than half of any of the weight stacks.

2. As Dr. Darden said, the transitions from positive to negative are incredible smooth; this is the case on every machine.

3. We experienced a great degree of soreness from our workout; the degree of inroad/fatigue was remarkable.

4. A few of the pieces still need improvement; the biceps and the triceps, for a number of reasons, were a little bit off.

5. All in all, we were very impressed with the machines and our workout. We are absolutely considering purchasing a few of these pieces for one of our future locations.
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admnautilus

Washington, USA

Hey Luke,
Sorry I missed you there. We found our workout and soreness to be very much as you did. The fatigue was deep and soreness was around for awhile. Of course with any change in your exercise program I expected to be sore. It was the fatigue that was different than a normal workout.

I also was very impressed, especially with the fit and finish of such a unique equipment concept.How did you like the feel of the cams? Also how did you like the feel of the resistance increase on the eccentric phase? Pretty darn smooth, huh? a few more tweeks and these should be ready for market. Jeff
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Ellington Darden

I watched Luke and his friend train on some of the X-Force machines. Believe me, they worked intensely and I was curious as to how they would feel several days later.

Thanks guys.

Ellington
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theHITman

Michael Petrella wrote:
Drew Baye wrote:
Unless they can manufacture them here, the cost seems really prohibitive considering each machine only provides a single exercise.

Any chance there is a multi unit that could use one weight stack? I could see that doing very well here in personal training studio's. Much like the old pendulum unit.


This from Dr Darden earlier:

Dr Darden Wrote:
Plus, I've already seen prototypes of an X-Force home machine -- which, for example, has a tilting weight stack in the middle, surrounded by six stations, such the bench press, leg press, overhead press, lat pulldpwn, biceps curl, and abdominal crunch.


With it being dubbed a 'home' machine, I don't know how big the weight stack will be, but if the idea is extended into a commercial version, it could definitely be a viable purchase for trainers, etc.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

theHITman wrote:

With it being dubbed a 'home' machine, I don't know how big the weight stack will be, but if the idea is extended into a commercial version, it could definitely be a viable purchase for trainers, etc.


The prototype of Randy's machine I'm working with only takes up 30x48 inches of floor space, and the motor provides as much resistance as anyone could possibly require. It can be used for squats, standing calf raise, deadlift, stiff-legged deadlift, seated dips, shrugs, pulldowns, and shoulder press.

He has another machine with similar dimensions that does leg press, leg curl, seated calf raise, chest press, row, abs, and back extension.

These are only weeks from production.

As for trainers, the motorized resistance is a huge plus, since if you want to do forced reps, hyper, negative-only, heavy statics, etc. you can do it all day long, client after client, without wearing yourself out.

And, since there's no weight stack they weigh far less than weight-stack machines of any kind, so you don't have the same problems having them on a second-story in a home or building.

For a home unit, weight is a major consideration. If the floor you're putting the machine on is anything less than concrete slab or was built specifically to handle higher static loads, you can't have anything too heavy. If you're going to put a machine on an upper floor, or on the main floor of a house with a basement or crawl space, you'd better not exceed the weight limit.

Randy's Hybrid machines are also only 30" wide - easily able to fit through standard residential doors without having to be disassembled.
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