MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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tpklose

Griff,
I haven?t ordered the book yet.
I am not sure about shipment to Germany
and the ordering process/security involved.

Anyway, if it is not published in the book, here is the link to Werner Kieser?s website (english version).
We have 2 facilities in my area here in Germany.

www.kieser-training.com/en/index.html


Thomas Klose
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karma50

Thomas,
Thanks. I was born in Darmstadt. My dad was in the army and stationed there after the war. My mom was German. If Kieser is anything like my mom, it's all no-nonsense. But with a sens of humor.
I'll check out the website.
Griff
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markandspike

markandspike wrote:
Quote by Ellington in article how big is your neck "When I met Arthur Jones in 1970 and eventually became employed by him (Nautilus) in 1973"


Ellington the photo of you was taken before you trained HIT you were doing volume training in the time.
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tpklose

Griff,
so your dad was there with the US Army ?.

Werner Kieser actually is from Switzerland.

BR
Thomas
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tpklose

Griff,
I missed the one sentence which makes my question in the pervious post obsolete.
Sorry.
I am from Cologne by the way.

Thomas
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Ellington Darden

markandspike,

I started easing into HIT, after I met Jones in the summer of 1970. I really got into HIT, under Jones's personal supervision, in the summer of 1971 . . . and was in my leanest, best-competition condition in April and May of 1972.

Ellington
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jack32

strengthmaster wrote:

The thing I think most people need is to experience the "Real HIT". As great as it is to read about, most will still not get it. Until, they experience it under the guidance of someone who really
knows what its all about. I was lucky enough years ago to get that from Kim Wood and Dr. Ken Leistner. I had done the reading and thought I knew what HARD
TRAINING was, but I didn't know, til I was shown the way. I owe Kim a great deal of thanks for my "education", both as a trainee and as a strength coach.


Scott,
Couldn't agree more. I was trained by Roger Schwab and Kevin Tolbert, and got a real good A_ _ 'whippin, under their watchful eyes!
jack
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dr ken

Ell- You don't need another plug for the book on this site but I want to give you one anyway. I just received two copies that I ordered (one for me, one for my staff) and Steve Baldwin was kind enough to send one more so we're in the chips and if this is to serve as a reference copy one can go to frequently, perhaps most of the readers should have another copy on hand. I went through it quickly and noted the good and the bad:

The good? All of it, a "call to arms" to train hard; great photo of Kim with a full head of flowing hair and I remember when all of us were younger, stronger, and Kim was quite the bon vivant!

My wife was relieved that there were no photos of me projectile vomiting behind the paint booth, lying in the dirt on Ohio Avenue, or stretched out on the factory floor after being tossed out of the prototype squat machine shown on page 213 as Inge took a host of photos.

I don't even have a complaint about you and Roger talking about the Cincinnati seminar and slamming me about what you considered to be the poor form I had Kevin utilize. If you recall, your criticism was aimed not only at Kevin and me, but as strongly at Kim too, who had trained Bengal All Pro Reggie Williams immediately before Kevin and I hit the weights.

Kim, Gittleson, and I were as hot as you were on the issue and aligned opposite you that day, but we did agree to disagree in a respectful manner and pushed the message of hard and brief training forward and certainly gave everyone in attendance plenty to think about which is always a good thing.

The negatives of the book? Only the recent photos of old friends Kim, Jim Flanagan, Wes Brown, and Dan Riley reminding me that we're getting old and only you among us still look like a young guy.

I also disliked the fact that your wife's shoulders are better developed than mine!! Beauty and muscles, a tough combination to beat.

Great job, great blueprint for others to follow, a great reminder of what it was like for many of us and what works. Pat yourself on the back.
Dr. Ken
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Ellington Darden

Dr. Ken,

I really do appreciate your views on my book. I was a little worried about what you might say about the discussion that Roger and I had . . . and you're right, Kim and Reggie were in there too. But the INTENSITY of each set that you and Kim were connected to was very much on target.

You know, Ken, I still remember vividly that trip to Ft. White, Florida, where we floated on inner tubes down the Ichnetucknee River. What great fun.

We've got to do that again, soon.

Ellington
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markandspike

Ellington Darden wrote:
markandspike,

I started easing into HIT, after I met Jones in the summer of 1970. I really got into HIT, under Jones's personal supervision, in the summer of 1971 . . . and was in my leanest, best-competition condition in April and May of 1972.

Ellington


But the photo you posted was took in 1968. Was this a miss print about the dates. Hope i can get the book in england will be ordering soon (pay-day)
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k38wood

still skyin' over the book...
Ell, you've presented "the old days"
the way they SHOULD be remembered...
yet at the same time you present
"HIT" as a very real and vibrant
training philosophy for the present...
and the future.
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EB Jones

New York, USA

Ordered yesterday, will be here on wednesday the 7th. LOOKING FORWARD to its arrival!!!
Thanks Dr. Darden
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dr ken

Ell- I hope you were "concerned" about my response because you respect my opinion and professional work and not because Arthur, of all lunatics, thought I was the worst one down there! Arthur once said that he didn't trust me. I told him that it was an insulting statement (from Arthur? What a shock!) and asked why not.

He cited a number of reasons which included; you're from New York; you went to California to check out the lifting scene there; you're obviously intelligent but crazy (a "left-handed compliment" perhaps?); and finally, no one down here is sure how you'll react to any situation and you're capable of doing almost anything. I pointed out that he had me living in his house as

I did the demolition work for the new mansion, he had me over for dinner at the apartment, he had me picking up the mail which I gathered was a major sign of being on his good side, and he had some legitimately strong and tough guys down there (Kim) who were much more of a handful than I could ever be and others who legitimately uh, guys who had already proven they would and could make poor decisions and break the law (Ron Peters who I drove the tractor-trailer with). I was very small time relative to being a potential problem compared to at least one-third of the employees we had!!! Are you laughing yet?

Ell, we disagreed and no doubt continue to on some points of training but I have no problem with that, there is respect on my part and this book really is the topper. I mimiced Kim and read it twice today. The message is so clear but as all of us old guys know, even those who read it, want to embrace HIT and do the right thing, and those who want the information to improve, they and most others will still "miss".

I know we have guys on this board who train so hard they have near-death experiences or impress the living Hell out of everyone else in the gym or otherwise frighten away any potential spouses because they train so hard but most of course, won't, even when they think they are. You've given them very much what Bulletin One and Two have, the complete picture, perhaps a better picture, of what was done, what should be done, what could be done, enough to last a lifetime of training.

For those who want "all the secrets" well, its here within the pages of the new book. The photos are great, I loved Arthur on the pullover with Tom Wood no doubt the only one with balls enough to say things like "Let's go Arthur, stop fucking around and do another one"; photos of some of the older equipment and all the memories they evoked, from the prototype shop to assembly (with Big Sammy slugging down a case of soda a day at work as he assembled machines that sometimes had four hundred separate parts and connecting pieces) to the truck and places Dick Wall or Ron Peters and I drove them too; great shots of Kim and a reminder to all what he has meant to the entire industry.

I can go on but I'm rather flattered I even got a mention, positive or negative, in such a great volume. This is a very valued piece, and once again, great, great job.
Dr. Ken
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viable

Florida, USA

Would this book, like so many of your previous, be a complete, wide-ranging edition on fat loss/dieting, recipes, lifestyle content, etc., or, strictly emphasis on muscle building intensity?

Refreshing to see you still so active and instrumental as a pioneer of proper strength-training methodology. Accolades to you.

Chris
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Ellington Darden

Chris,

There's only a brief mention of dieting, fat loss, and a couple of getting-lean recipes and guidelines in chapter 19.

Ellington
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Tom Traynor

I really like the anecdotal nature of the book. Since Dr. Ken probably isn't interested writing his own book, maybe you're next one could included his perspective and stories, as well as Kim Woods and others.

I remember Dr. Ken talking on genetic potential--specifically watching Sergio sit there and blow up pump/vascularity-wise--simply from eating a bag of potato chips!

Kim Woods coments on Tim Krumrie: My best friend (offensive guard) had the, uh, "pleasure" of playing against Tim while both were in college.

He said his first impression was before the snap looking down at Tim's ankles and calfs and noting his damn socks wouldn't FIT over the calf muscles like everyone else's--then following up the legs and body and seeing the structural thickness which he thought unusual in a bad way, like: "Hooboy, this will be a game I'll never forget".....It was like trying to move a chunk of cement.
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cmg

Dr. D,

I received the book yesterday - it is great. I can't wait to read in detail. I was up til about 2am skimming through. I was very excited to see that you posted my A&B routines and gave me a mention/credit.

Thank you!!

Ron
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

To get mentioned in such a comprehensive account, surrounded by guys I read about and looked up to (even though from a distance)is very flattering.

Thirty years ago, I was blown away by this little blue book I found called "Strength Training Principles" (and whoever borrowed it GIVE IT BACK).

For you to continue to contribute and influence and promote sensible training for this whole time is an enormous accomplishment. Think of all the fitness flame-outs in that time: Jane Fonda-out. Jake-infomercials. Billy Blanks-? The list could go on. All came and went, but you lasted.

With all the influence you've had on me and others, getting a positive comment from you is greatly encouraging and appreciated. Thanks, Dr.
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Ellington Darden

Dr. Ken,

Yes, I respect your opinion and your work . . . and I enjoy your
stories . . . and I just flat out like you.

Thanks for your support.

Ellington
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Ellington Darden

Ron Glaser,

Your A-B Basic Workouts, on page 221, are some of my favorites. Thanks for your contributions.

Ellington
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Ellington Darden

Bill De Simone,

"Strength-Training Principles," which I wrote in 1976, brings back a lot of memories. I'll give you a copy the next time I see you.

By the way, Bill has a one-on-one training center, based on solid biomechanics, in Princeton, N J.

Ellington
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strengthmaster

Michigan, USA

Dr. Darden,

Question about page 56 in the book. The
library shot. Where was it taken? And that can't be the actual floor. Computer
generated? Or is it?

Scott
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Ellington Darden

Scott,

Most of the picture was computer generated.

Ellington
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Robert Francis

New York, USA

strengthmaster wrote:
Dr. Darden,

Question about page 56 in the book. The
library shot. Where was it taken? And that can't be the actual floor. Computer
generated? Or is it?

Scott


Hey Scott,

Take look at the books on the shelves-how many times is the identical group of books repeated in the photo? In particular, look at the white books where one is leaning over- this grouping of books repeats several times with only a slight change in perspective. All photoshop-the lights, the shelves, the glare all of it...
A really VERY NICE EFFECT!
Another really nice effect is the side X side comparison of Casey's front and back poses on page 216-REALLY NICE WORK!
AND I LOVE that photo of Casey "on Muscle Beach" page 300...
Ell Darden has really outdone EVERYONE in the field with this one.

zand.
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kurtvf

I would like to see a copy of that M&F article where Joe Weider writes a critique of Nautilus machines. Imagine someone who knows practically nothing about exercise critiqueing somthing he probably couldn't even begin to comprehend. I read on another site that the Natilus machines in the original Gold's gym were personally owned by Franco Columbu-anyone know if this is true??
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