MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Trentine
First | Prev | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | Next | Last
Author
Rating
Options

AI1963

The AHA does not have the sterling reputation it once did.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/..._b_4398304.html

One can easily find many other examples of the AHA's less-than-objective actions.

I don't know that their exercise recommendations are any more unimpeachable than their drug or dietary recommendations are.
Open User Options Menu

simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

And Twice/Week may be nearly as good as wasting your valuable time every day:
http://www.medicalnewstoday.co...
Open User Options Menu

1958

Texas, USA

I've never asked them,but I don't know whether or not my heart/lungs understand the concept of minutes per week.
Open User Options Menu

indexit

some more pictures of Joshua
Open User Options Menu

indexit

2
Open User Options Menu

indexit

3
Open User Options Menu

indexit

4
Open User Options Menu

indexit

5
Open User Options Menu

ATP 4 Vitality

After sufficient time for rebuttal of the value of aerobic conditioning, the rabble who identify with Trentine's views of aerobics, seem only to offer emotional responses, far from required facts and logic.

More facts:

1) Aerobic conditioning increases the number of capillaries which deliver oxygen and glucose and rid muscles of waste products

2) Aerobic conditioning ramps up the myoglobin content of muscle fibers.....more oxygen

3) Aerobic conditioning ramps up the number and size of mitochondria in muscles ...like a voltage increase of an ignition coil
Open User Options Menu

StuKE

I'd like to think these short, intense workouts,would be all you need but I really don't think that would cut it.
In terms of what we 'need', I think too much, too intense etc may not always be a good thing. I once read for longevity, gentle outdoor exercise is all we need or even is the best for us - such as golf, walking, gardening. It's about moving around a lot basically. We don't need to get out heart up near it's limit, not if we are not an athlete or trying to be the best,,win races etc.

I think we have to question the negatives and risks from forcing the heart to work so hard. For one thing , it can and does expose previously unknown heart defects, we all hear of fit people dropping from heart attacks, also, perhaps the physiological stress of say being an Olympic rower, maybe that takes a few years of your life... Just a thought.
Open User Options Menu

Crotalus

StuKE wrote:
In terms of what we 'need', I think too much, too intense etc may not always be a good thing.
------------
... the physiological stress ...

-------------

Yeah, years ago I introduced a guy to HIT when before he was training with more volume. One day he showed up for the workout and just told me though his results were never better while training this way he couldn't continue , it was just too hard and he just came to hate training and was going to take some time off.

Never saw him again and always wondered if 'insisting ' on him training like that was responsible for him quitting for good - which I didn't / don't see as a good thing. Always bugged me that training HIT fashion could have killed his interest in exercise altogether.

Whatever it is you're doing ; eating certain foods because they're 'good for you' ( like Brian's 'Liver Shakes', LOL ) , methods of exercise that are supposed to be 'the best way' or especially your work, hating it and forcing yourself is never a good, healthy thing to do.


Open User Options Menu

Frank Scott

StUke
Good sense
Open User Options Menu

HeavyHitter32

StuKE wrote:
I'd like to think these short, intense workouts,would be all you need but I really don't think that would cut it.
In terms of what we 'need', I think too much, too intense etc may not always be a good thing. I once read for longevity, gentle outdoor exercise is all we need or even is the best for us - such as golf, walking, gardening. It's about moving around a lot basically. We don't need to get out heart up near it's limit, not if we are not an athlete or trying to be the best,,win races etc.

I think we have to question the negatives and risks from forcing the heart to work so hard. For one thing , it can and does expose previously unknown heart defects, we all hear of fit people dropping from heart attacks, also, perhaps the physiological stress of say being an Olympic rower, maybe that takes a few years of your life... Just a thought.


Good points. Another reason why I don't train to failure regularly and stay just short of it. Why strain and stress yourself to that level "battling" the last rep?
Open User Options Menu

simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

More than just A thought, Stuke, and all good!
Open User Options Menu

StuKE

Thanks guys. Actually, I was referring to aerobic exercise as opposed to the weight, but I suppose it can apply just the same.
I have heard/known people who have died after long / hard runs etc. I used to think it was only unfit people this happened to, shocking their body but no, it happens to regular runners too. Once read that they (the faceless 'they') said a Tour de France knocks time off your life. I wouldn't know how true that is, but the point that making your body work too hard can certainly be detrimental. An example for myself would be the time I suffered way more than I ever had on a 50 mile bike ride (mountain bike). I was in pain, exhausted, nauseous and just an absolute wreck. It turned out my front brake had been rubbing the whole way, but the point is, I knew it had crossed the line.
Af for weight training, I happen to think HIT is very good, as I think many other methods are, but it can leave you feeling mentally and physically drained for a few days afterwards.
Open User Options Menu

entsminger

Virginia, USA

indexit wrote:
some more pictures of Joshua


==Scott==
Ok, Josh looks pretty damn good and he's pretty dang strong for the bean pole genetics he was given.So is there another point to all these pictures other than Josh has built some fine muscles? Is this an effort to bring back those lame RENEX discussions or what?
Open User Options Menu

Average Al

HD2 wrote:

Sorry I still do not see the supporting information.


Then I'm not sure what you are/were looking for. Probably not worth discussing further, especially since it is off the original topic.
Open User Options Menu

Average Al

StuKE wrote:
Thanks guys. Actually, I was referring to aerobic exercise as opposed to the weight, but I suppose it can apply just the same.
I have heard/known people who have died after long / hard runs etc. I used to think it was only unfit people this happened to, shocking their body but no, it happens to regular runners too. Once read that they (the faceless 'they') said a Tour de France knocks time off your life. I wouldn't know how true that is, but the point that making your body work too hard can certainly be detrimental. An example for myself would be the time I suffered way more than I ever had on a 50 mile bike ride (mountain bike). I was in pain, exhausted, nauseous and just an absolute wreck. It turned out my front brake had been rubbing the whole way, but the point is, I knew it had crossed the line.
Af for weight training, I happen to think HIT is very good, as I think many other methods are, but it can leave you feeling mentally and physically drained for a few days afterwards.



This seems to reinforce the concerns you raise:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/....12830/abstract

"An interesting and still not well-understood example for old medical wisdom ?Sola dosis facit venenum? is the increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in athletes. Numerous studies have shown a fourfold to eightfold increased risk of AF in athletes compared to the normal population. Analysis of the existing data suggests a dose-dependent effect of exercise. Moderate exercise seems to have a protective effect and decreases the risk of AF, whereas excessive exercise seems to increase the risk of AF."
Open User Options Menu

Nwlifter

Yes, there is always 'too much of a good thing'.
I remember reading an article about a marathon runner, he was vegan, super healthy, but ran a LOT each week for years, he started having fibrillation, they found his heart was so innervated that he was getting crossed signals, he had to have heart surgery where they actually cut all over his heart to severe some of the nerves.


Average Al wrote:
StuKE wrote:
Thanks guys. Actually, I was referring to aerobic exercise as opposed to the weight, but I suppose it can apply just the same.
I have heard/known people who have died after long / hard runs etc. I used to think it was only unfit people this happened to, shocking their body but no, it happens to regular runners too. Once read that they (the faceless 'they') said a Tour de France knocks time off your life. I wouldn't know how true that is, but the point that making your body work too hard can certainly be detrimental. An example for myself would be the time I suffered way more than I ever had on a 50 mile bike ride (mountain bike). I was in pain, exhausted, nauseous and just an absolute wreck. It turned out my front brake had been rubbing the whole way, but the point is, I knew it had crossed the line.
Af for weight training, I happen to think HIT is very good, as I think many other methods are, but it can leave you feeling mentally and physically drained for a few days afterwards.


This seems to reinforce the concerns you raise:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/....12830/abstract

"An interesting and still not well-understood example for old medical wisdom ?Sola dosis facit venenum? is the increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in athletes. Numerous studies have shown a fourfold to eightfold increased risk of AF in athletes compared to the normal population. Analysis of the existing data suggests a dose-dependent effect of exercise. Moderate exercise seems to have a protective effect and decreases the risk of AF, whereas excessive exercise seems to increase the risk of AF."


Open User Options Menu

hit4me

Florida, USA

ok, what is considered too much of a good thing
6 days/week 2 -3 hours of weight training plus moderate cardio
2 - 3 days/week full body to MMF with moderate cardio
3 days/week split routine MMF with moderate cardio
1/2 marathon or full marathon runs
running 5 miles a day
Crossfit training 4 to 6 days week

with the maount of individuals training around the world in any of these fashions, what is the percentage of heart related deaths or even just attacks?






Nwlifter wrote:
Yes, there is always 'too much of a good thing'.
I remember reading an article about a marathon runner, he was vegan, super healthy, but ran a LOT each week for years, he started having fibrillation, they found his heart was so innervated that he was getting crossed signals, he had to have heart surgery where they actually cut all over his heart to severe some of the nerves.


Average Al wrote:
StuKE wrote:
Thanks guys. Actually, I was referring to aerobic exercise as opposed to the weight, but I suppose it can apply just the same.
I have heard/known people who have died after long / hard runs etc. I used to think it was only unfit people this happened to, shocking their body but no, it happens to regular runners too. Once read that they (the faceless 'they') said a Tour de France knocks time off your life. I wouldn't know how true that is, but the point that making your body work too hard can certainly be detrimental. An example for myself would be the time I suffered way more than I ever had on a 50 mile bike ride (mountain bike). I was in pain, exhausted, nauseous and just an absolute wreck. It turned out my front brake had been rubbing the whole way, but the point is, I knew it had crossed the line.
Af for weight training, I happen to think HIT is very good, as I think many other methods are, but it can leave you feeling mentally and physically drained for a few days afterwards.


This seems to reinforce the concerns you raise:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/....12830/abstract

"An interesting and still not well-understood example for old medical wisdom ?Sola dosis facit venenum? is the increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in athletes. Numerous studies have shown a fourfold to eightfold increased risk of AF in athletes compared to the normal population. Analysis of the existing data suggests a dose-dependent effect of exercise. Moderate exercise seems to have a protective effect and decreases the risk of AF, whereas excessive exercise seems to increase the risk of AF."




Open User Options Menu

HeavyHitter32

There was a large study done with marathon runners that showed that their bodies released the exact same enzyme that occurs with a heart attack. I was reading about it in a Cleveland Clinic newsletter a couple of years ago.

I doubt weight training to failure has this kind of effect as it's very short in duration. But we know training heavy and to failure does cause more arterial constriction.
Open User Options Menu

HeavyHitter32

Too much of a "good thing" is bad. Of course, it's relative to the person.

I mean, I started getting knee pain doing only 25 minutes of cardio 5-6 days per week which doesn't sound like much, but it was for my knees.
Open User Options Menu

StuKE

hit4me wrote:
ok, what is considered too much of a good thing
6 days/week 2 -3 hours of weight training plus moderate cardio
2 - 3 days/week full body to MMF with moderate cardio
3 days/week split routine MMF with moderate cardio
1/2 marathon or full marathon runs
running 5 miles a day
Crossfit training 4 to 6 days week

with the maount of individuals training around the world in any of these fashions, what is the percentage of heart related deaths or even just attacks?

I wouldn't know. Maybe the percentage is low, maybe most sensible routines are fine. I'm not suggesting everyone avoids hard physical exercise, but after a point, and that point will vary from individual to individual, it is lilely doing more harm than good. I think that very vague statement is fair to say!
The old Tabata style training for me is an example I like to use: apparently great benefits for the cardiovascular system from an extremely short amount of high intensity aerobic exercise. 5-6 minutes I believe. It may be short, but it most certainly is not easy, requiring all out effort with the heart rate very high. Now it may well lead to great fitness, but it is not going to make a person a champion long distance cyclist or runner, also, if a person has any heart or other defect, you can be damn sure you run a much higher risk of exposing it. It's like a car - you can drive it around for years sensibly, or you can redline it and push the engine to it's limits and which do you think is going to be the more risky way of driving?






Nwlifter wrote:
Yes, there is always 'too much of a good thing'.
I remember reading an article about a marathon runner, he was vegan, super healthy, but ran a LOT each week for years, he started having fibrillation, they found his heart was so innervated that he was getting crossed signals, he had to have heart surgery where they actually cut all over his heart to severe some of the nerves.


Average Al wrote:
StuKE wrote:
Thanks guys. Actually, I was referring to aerobic exercise as opposed to the weight, but I suppose it can apply just the same.
I have heard/known people who have died after long / hard runs etc. I used to think it was only unfit people this happened to, shocking their body but no, it happens to regular runners too. Once read that they (the faceless 'they') said a Tour de France knocks time off your life. I wouldn't know how true that is, but the point that making your body work too hard can certainly be detrimental. An example for myself would be the time I suffered way more than I ever had on a 50 mile bike ride (mountain bike). I was in pain, exhausted, nauseous and just an absolute wreck. It turned out my front brake had been rubbing the whole way, but the point is, I knew it had crossed the line.
Af for weight training, I happen to think HIT is very good, as I think many other methods are, but it can leave you feeling mentally and physically drained for a few days afterwards.


This seems to reinforce the concerns you raise:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/....12830/abstract

"An interesting and still not well-understood example for old medical wisdom ?Sola dosis facit venenum? is the increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in athletes. Numerous studies have shown a fourfold to eightfold increased risk of AF in athletes compared to the normal population. Analysis of the existing data suggests a dose-dependent effect of exercise. Moderate exercise seems to have a protective effect and decreases the risk of AF, whereas excessive exercise seems to increase the risk of AF."






Open User Options Menu

StuKE

indexit wrote:
5


Very impressive shot. The front double biceps not as much, not saying I would complain if I looked like that though!
Open User Options Menu

Nwlifter

It's probably individual, we have no idea what our individual tolerances are, some might be able to handle any of those, some might not....


hit4me wrote:
ok, what is considered too much of a good thing
6 days/week 2 -3 hours of weight training plus moderate cardio
2 - 3 days/week full body to MMF with moderate cardio
3 days/week split routine MMF with moderate cardio
1/2 marathon or full marathon runs
running 5 miles a day
Crossfit training 4 to 6 days week

with the maount of individuals training around the world in any of these fashions, what is the percentage of heart related deaths or even just attacks?






Nwlifter wrote:
Yes, there is always 'too much of a good thing'.
I remember reading an article about a marathon runner, he was vegan, super healthy, but ran a LOT each week for years, he started having fibrillation, they found his heart was so innervated that he was getting crossed signals, he had to have heart surgery where they actually cut all over his heart to severe some of the nerves.


Average Al wrote:
StuKE wrote:
Thanks guys. Actually, I was referring to aerobic exercise as opposed to the weight, but I suppose it can apply just the same.
I have heard/known people who have died after long / hard runs etc. I used to think it was only unfit people this happened to, shocking their body but no, it happens to regular runners too. Once read that they (the faceless 'they') said a Tour de France knocks time off your life. I wouldn't know how true that is, but the point that making your body work too hard can certainly be detrimental. An example for myself would be the time I suffered way more than I ever had on a 50 mile bike ride (mountain bike). I was in pain, exhausted, nauseous and just an absolute wreck. It turned out my front brake had been rubbing the whole way, but the point is, I knew it had crossed the line.
Af for weight training, I happen to think HIT is very good, as I think many other methods are, but it can leave you feeling mentally and physically drained for a few days afterwards.


This seems to reinforce the concerns you raise:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/....12830/abstract

"An interesting and still not well-understood example for old medical wisdom ?Sola dosis facit venenum? is the increased prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in athletes. Numerous studies have shown a fourfold to eightfold increased risk of AF in athletes compared to the normal population. Analysis of the existing data suggests a dose-dependent effect of exercise. Moderate exercise seems to have a protective effect and decreases the risk of AF, whereas excessive exercise seems to increase the risk of AF."






Open User Options Menu
First | Previous | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | Next | Last
Administrators Online: Mod Jump'n Jack
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy