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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Dizziness
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MotorFed

California, USA

I poured over the new book, cover to cover, and I am into the second week of HIT training on the beginner routine #1. Everything is going great and I have already noticed my muscles responding. My only problem is with the overhead press. It never fails that while I am doing it I get dizzy midway through the set. I have been paying close attention to my breathing and trying to not to hold my breath as well as trying not to take too deep of breaths. Will my body get used to this as time goes on? Or am I doing something wrong? Any suggestions would be great.

Peace
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Dustin Jordan

Florida, USA

MotorFed,
Your body may adapt, but if it doesn't,I'd definetly perform them seated and possibly with dumbells.

Dustin
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rwalk

I got dizzy doing overhead presses as well. However, as I got stronger the dizziness went away.
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Mr Nautilus

Motorfed,

If you go dizzy doing anything, stop doing it!

Do something else, it's not the end of the world.

If you really want to continue, go see your quack first. If he declares you compus mentus proceed with caution.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

What exercises are you performing and in what order?

It is not uncommon for people to become dizzy or lightheaded during a high intensity workout, especially if they are breathing heavily.

Nausea, dizziness and light headedness are normal during high intensity training. If you were experiencing any of these on their own then you would have cause for concern.

Drew Baye
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Ferrari

Quebec, CAN

How many exercises and sets are you performing?

If you are doing a lot then take an extra minute before the overhead and regroup.
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Mr Nautilus

What if this guy has vertigo or something. I think people are missing the point here. Surely it would be prudent for him to seek medical attention before he carries on with the training?

Can yo imagine the scene; "Doctor, I go dizzy when I train with weights, but Drew says it's normal to feel that way along with some nausea and light-headedness."

"That's ok then, son. As long as you train to failure you have nothing to worry about."
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MotorFed

California, USA

Hey Everybody,

Thanks for the advice so far.

I do most of my exercise on machines since I workout on my own. I have a shoulder injury so I try and be extra careful not to reinjure it.

My routines is as follows:

Seated leg curl
Leg Extension
Leg Press
usually take about a 2-minute break here
Pullovers with DB
Chest Press on Hammer Strength
Row on Hammer Strength
Overhead Press on Hammer Strength
Break for 2 minutes
Biceps Curl
Triceps Extension
Wrist Curl
Calf Raise on Leg Press

I work each exercise with 1 set about 6-12 reps. I push each one to about 1 or 2 shy of total failure as I am just ending my 2nd week on Saturday.

I think that Drew may be right. Maybe I am just experiencing typical light headedness that comes with HIT. Maybe I'll place a bit of a break before the Press.

Any more suggestions would be great. Thanks All.
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Ferrari

Quebec, CAN

As you are new to HIT you may just be feeling something temporary. However this doesn't mean that you should ignore warnings like this.

If it happens again don't get up from the machine but stay there until you feel better. End your workout there.

Go home and rest or see a doctor. Another alternative is to do less sets.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Mr. Nautilus, how many years have you worked as an instructor and how many workouts have you supervised during that time?

I'm just wondering what your frame of reference is, since in my experience having instructed thousands of workouts over the past 10 years, dizziness, light headedness, and nausea have been common in subjects who train with a high level of intensity.

However, these symptoms all pass shortly after the workout and have never caused any physical problems.

If it always happens on the same exercise, regardless of exercise sequence, workout intensity, etc., then I would be concerned.

Perhaps you can't relate because you've never trained hard enough to experience any of these?

Drew Baye
www.baye.com
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

When you perform the rows on the hammer press, do you have difficulty breathing due to the pressure on the sternum?

Drew Baye
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crazeeJZ

MotorFed,

Since you've barely started to train, or barely got back to training, you should take a minute or two break in between the chest press, the row, and the overhead press. These are all big exercises, and if your cardio conditioning is lacking a little, then this might be the cause of your dizziness. You're best served to take a break in between each until your cardio conditioning improves.
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Mr Nautilus

Drew Baye wrote:
Mr. Nautilus, how many years have you worked as an instructor and how many workouts have you supervised during that time?


Andrew, it wouldn't matter if I had supervised a million workouts or none, it wouldn't qualify me to give a medical diagnosis.

I'm just wondering what your frame of reference is

My frame of reference is common sense, something that's sorely lacking in the world of strength training in general and on this thread in particular.

Perhaps you can't relate because you've never trained hard enough to experience any of these?

I think you may be the one who is having difficulty relating. MotorFed said that he got dizzy during a workout. I suggested that he seek a medical opinion. What's difficult to relate to about that?

What astonishes me is that with all your experience of training clients, you didn't mention he visit a doctor to make sure all was well. Instead you gave a carte blanche diagnosis that the training was the cause. Of course it may well be caused by the training, and I hope that it is, but how can you know that?

I don't need to have vomited in the gym to realise all of this and nor does anyone else. Last time I checked, the training for a medical degree didn't include inducing those symptoms in a gym to be able to recognise them in patients.

PEACE
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Like I said, dizziness is not at all uncommon during a high intensity workout, and since in all the years I've been training people nobody ever developed any problems as a result of it, I do not believe that it's anything to worry about within the context of a HIT workout.

If there was some medical condition, then it would probably not be limited to the overhead press and I would imagine he'd have experienced it before during other activities.

The fact that he's doing it after the hammer row makes me wonder if he's not breathing more heavily during the overhead press as a result of having difficulty breathing during the row. Whenever I used the hammer low row I found it very difficult to breathe deeply because of the pressure on my sternum.

Drew Baye
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Mr Nautilus

I do not believe that it's anything to worry about within the context of a HIT workout.

Dru, I would agree with that if the trainee had already got the all-clear from a doctor.

If there was some medical condition, then it would probably not be limited to the overhead press and I would imagine he'd have experienced it before during other activities.

If there was a medical condition it would exist on every exercise, but the symptoms may only present themselves on certain movements.
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MotorFed

California, USA

Hey All,

I worked out yesterday and took many points of advice into consideration. I lowered my weight a bit on the overhead press as well as rested a little bit longer before it and completed a my set to about 1-2 shy of complete failure. Things went well and I experienced minimal dizziness.
Perhaps I was doing too much too soon too quickly.
Thanks all for your help.
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Gazz

Do Lateral raises instead. Problem solved.

Gazz
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