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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
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Right Arm Smaller Than Left!
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pete872

Any suggestions? I'm a "righty" and I'm guessing that due to it's normal higher workload for everyday things, it's going to take more stimulation through training for it to respond as my left arm is doing. Is it recommended to to any exercises specifically for my right arm?
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Ciccio

pete872 wrote:
Any suggestions? I'm a "righty" and I'm guessing that due to it's normal higher workload for everyday things, it's going to take more stimulation through training for it to respond as my left arm is doing. Is it recommended to to any exercises specifically for my right arm?


hey pete,

No! Like you wrote yourself, your right arm has already a higher workload for everyday things. So, how can even more work be better?
Maybe you could try to do more everyday things with your left arm to even things out?

This said, my left arm is 1/4inch bigger then my right too after years of training and this approach didn't work for me:)

I think you just have to live with it.
But why worry about it when even big Aaaanold had two very differently shaped biceps!

And we know where he get with this "problem".

Regards,

Franco





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HamsFitness

this is interesting, although it may seem that the `you are right handed` response seems sensible i am not sure it is the correct answer, or rather then only answer.

My brother is left handed as is a good friend and they both have the same issue - their right arms are smaller even though the left has higher workload throughout the day.

I dont think such things as typing, eating, drinking etc are strain enough to warrant a large change in muscular size.

I suspect it has something to do with the thoracic outlet, capilirisation and readily available blood supply.

not things that are easily controlled!
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bill1

California, USA

Don't work your right arm more or differently, try working your arms SEPERATELY, with the same amount of resistance , time under load,frequency , intensity etc. for each arm , for a while. This may help a bit but I believe perfect symetry is impossible.

Bill
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pete872

I've read where you can lift more in each arm then combined. Let's say at max effort you can do a barbell curl with 100 Lbs. You could probably put up 55 or 60 Lbs. in each arm individually. It has something to do with the amount of (nerve) energy that can be fired into the working muscles. I think we need Dr D's input on this!
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donald

Arthur Jones wrote years ago that most people's arm opposite of their dominate arm would become larger after training for a time because of neuro/coordination factors. If you are right handed, you're more then likely also more coordinated in that arm, hince your left arm works with more intensity to do the same amout of work with the weight you are using. My thighs and calves are different sizes for the same reason. I think working your arms singulary wouldn't change those conditions if using the same weight.
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Bubba Earl

Georgia, USA

My left pectoral muscle is smaller than my right. It is noticeable, but I believe it is genetic. I do not hold back on any exercises and do not believe I can remedy the problem. Expectations are often times hard for me to manage, especially at 37.
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bill1

California, USA

donald wrote:
Arthur Jones wrote years ago that most people's arm opposite of their dominate arm would become larger after training for a time because of neuro/coordination factors. If you are right handed, you're more then likely also more coordinated in that arm, hince your left arm works with more intensity to do the same amout of work with the weight you are using. My thighs and calves are different sizes for the same reason. I think working your arms singulary wouldn't change those conditions if using the same weight.


The left arm has to work harder in a coordinated effort in right handed people, working them independantly with the same resistance will "even" out the workload.

Bill
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donald

I'm willing to bet that when worked independantly, you'll be able to get more repetitions with the dominate arm. How is this going to even things out unless you quit early with the dominate arm? And how are going to determine when to stop the exercise with that arm?
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bill1

California, USA

The weak arm will " catch up " to some extent. Stop when you reach momentary musclular failure with both arms. There is a limit to increases for both arms, if you work them independantly they will reach thier limits independantly, perhaps not at the same time but, eventually they will. Think about it.

Bill
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Ciccio

bill1 wrote:
The weak arm will " catch up " to some extent. Stop when you reach momentary musclular failure with both arms. There is a limit to increases for both arms, if you work them independantly they will reach thier limits independantly, perhaps not at the same time but, eventually they will. Think about it.

Bill


Good point, but isn't it very likely that they have different limits as well?
My experience tells me yes.

Another point: Are we speaking about unilateral training(one arm at a time, then the next) or synchronous training with independent movement arms(e.g.just using dumbells as opposed to a barbell)?
I should make a difference.

Franco




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glenn_001

New Zealand

donald wrote:
I'm willing to bet that when worked independantly, you'll be able to get more repetitions with the dominate arm. How is this going to even things out unless you quit early with the dominate arm? And how are going to determine when to stop the exercise with that arm?


You start with the weak arm and go to failure, if you get out 8 reps then you do 8 reps on the dominant arm, obviously it wont be to failure, but thats the whole point, get the weaker arm to catch up as quickly as possible.
This works as ive been through it myself. The right side still grows at the lower intensity and it took many months for my left to catch up.

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pete872

I think you're all assuming the smaller arm is also the weaker one. That isn't the case with me. My right arm although 1/4" smaller than the left has more strength and endurance than my left.
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