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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Hard Gainer?
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Acerimmer1

Ciccio wrote:
Acerimmer,

are your wrists fully supinated on that pic? If so you have really long biceps! Be happy!

Propably you're right with assuming the impression of elongated biceps is due to your forearms(they look quite big as well) grow bigger.
If anything at all, muscle bellies will shorten over time from aging. Visible elongation due to training is just not possible.


Franco



More supination is possible but uncumfortable, my forearm also shakes around. I don't really know if full supination for you and me is the same because I have a limited ROM in my elbow as compared to most according to what I read (it may have been something by Jones) my elbow joint only flexes to an angle which is probably not much less than 80 degrees, and is undoubtably greater than 45 degrees. Because our bones are obscured by our muscles though it's not easy for me to tell exactly where it lies but I'd say probably between 70 and 55 degrees.

Looking closely I think it's a little more supinated than the photo of Caseys arm Darden uses as a guide on page 56 of the New HIT.

I'm happy with that explanation about my forearms, I wouldn't rule out a surgical solution for lomg tendons in the future. I think more research is needed in general!

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eintology

California, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:

This is me months ago added .5 inches to my arms in the first 4 weeks of HIT which is since this photo! It illustrates that I have very little biceps gap, and what there is you can't really see. I'm pretty sure it wasn't always this way (I don't know why I think my forearm got bigger and closed the gap!)


Good job with the pics there Acer. You've been doing some serious work.
And the look in your eyes suggests ... Step back world ? Ace coming through! And he's taking no prisoners. Not even Dorian Yates.

Erik
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eintology

California, USA

Drew Baye wrote:
sinan wrote:
Drew, quick question, how are triathletes, rowers, runners, suppose to encorporate HIT. endurance training, especially long slow distance (LSD) is extremely catabolic (hence the skinny marathoners). any thoughts will be graetluy apprreciated. thanks

Most endurance athletes are grossly overtrained, and would do best to limit their endurance training activities to no more than 1 or 2 times per week, alternating with their HIT workouts, and separated by at least a day or two of rest. You require recovery from both.

Drew Baye


I would think the endurance athlete would always be a Hard Gainer, in terms of gaining muscle mass; just by virtue of their chosen sport. I've never seen a tri athlete that didn't look; for lack of a better term, flaccid.

Drew, would this two day per week HIT, and one or two days per week of endurance training be more for the recreational triathlete, runner, cyclist, rower etc., or would this advice be germane to someone who has aspirations to be on the level of a Mark Allen or a Lance Armstrong in their respective activities?

I remember reading years ago in the early Nautilus Books that most athletes over train, but doesn't the training have to somewhat approximate what the competition is going to provide? How do you bridge this?

Erik

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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Ace, what is your height and weight? If your lower body development is comparable, you could probably do well in natural contests.

Drew Baye
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Acerimmer1

About 5 ft 7 my weight is about 182 in gym gear on a good day.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
About 5 ft 7 my weight is about 182 in gym gear on a good day.


The cutoff for middleweight is usually around 176. If you could be cut in the low 170's you could probably do well as a middleweight. I wouldn't recommend going lower, as the lightweights are typically very short, and it's hard to stand next to someone with the same weight who's 4 or 5 inches shorter. I wouldn't recommend going higher either, since the cutoff for light heavyweight is usually around 200, and it would be better to be at the high end of the middle weights than the low end of the light heavy weights.

Drew Baye
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Acerimmer1

Drew Baye wrote:
Acerimmer1 wrote:
About 5 ft 7 my weight is about 182 in gym gear on a good day.

The cutoff for middleweight is usually around 176. If you could be cut in the low 170's you could probably do well as a middleweight. I wouldn't recommend going lower, as the lightweights are typically very short, and it's hard to stand next to someone with the same weight who's 4 or 5 inches shorter. I wouldn't recommend going higher either, since the cutoff for light heavyweight is usually around 200, and it would be better to be at the high end of the middle weights than the low end of the light heavy weights.

Drew Baye


Your right of course thats a sensible strategy. I'm thinking about competing in the long term (of course I'd do it tommorrow if I thought there was money in it), right now I'm thinking about how much easier it's going to be psychologically speaking to add that next 20lbs to my bench and that next 5lbs of muscle, with this thought in the back of my head.

"Step back world ? Ace coming through! And he's taking no prisoners. Not even Dorian Yates."

Thanks Eintology you just lit the match!
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Sesame

definition of 'hardgainer': If you weren't born looking like you pump iron, you're a hardgainer (99% of us).
:)
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Acerimmer1

Sesame wrote:
definition of 'hardgainer': If you weren't born looking like you pump iron, you're a hardgainer (99% of us).
:)


It's not about where you start it's where you finish! This time I do rest my case...See anybody you recognise?





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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

I just rented "The Machinist" this weekend. Christian Bale (the new Batman) at 120 lbs --- Geez! He looks grotesque.

If you want to see some contrast, rent "Equilibrium" at the same time. It's a half-decent SF flick from about 3 years ago, with CB at a good 180, maybe 190.

Scott
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Sesame

Drew Baye wrote:
sinan wrote:
Drew, quick question, how are triathletes, rowers, runners, suppose to encorporate HIT. endurance training, especially long slow distance (LSD) is extremely catabolic (hence the skinny marathoners). any thoughts will be graetluy apprreciated. thanks

Most endurance athletes are grossly overtrained, and would do best to limit their endurance training activities to no more than 1 or 2 times per week, alternating with their HIT workouts, and separated by at least a day or two of rest. You require recovery from both.

Drew Baye



I think you might be overstepping your knowledge at this point especially since you are not nor have you ever been a distance runner.

"Kenyan runners, and especially those originating from the Kalenjin tribe, have dominated international middle- and long-distance running for over 40 years, prompting significant interest in the factors contributing to their success."
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/...000004/art00010
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Sesame

Beauty is in eye of the beholder for most part but physiques like Dorian border on grotesque. It's TOO MUCH, imo! How much is too much? I think that too much!

My physique resembles..THIS!

http://tsunami.km.ua/...undgren_04.jpeg

Long, Lean, Muscular, Functional, Agile..
:)
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Acerimmer1

Sesame wrote:
Beauty is in eye of the beholder for most part but physiques like Dorian border on grotesque. It's TOO MUCH, imo! How much is too much? I think that too much!

My physique resembles..THIS!

http://tsunami.km.ua/...undgren_04.jpeg

Long, Lean, Muscular, Functional, Agile..
:)


I see your point:
I don't like Dolphs physique much myself but I can't accuse him of being grotesque. His acting however, that is a different kettle of fish entirely....And if he dies...He dies.
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sinan

The point that you raised about reaching the highly competitive/elite/world class level in an endurance event - triathlon, rowing, running, etc. by encorporating HIT while aproximating the distance and intensity of the racing distance is what I am trying to reconcile. I know that HIT works, i am also very aware of overtraining (although it should be noted that my body can endure high volumes of aerobic and resistance training - my old workout is 15 miles a day 6 days a week 10 sets of 35 pushups with 2 minutes rest in between sets 3 days a week M-W-F). HIT seems logical BUT you have to put in the miles if for nothing else but for the psychological and physiological adaptation of prolonged strength endurance work in high temperatures.
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ron33

acerimmer,From the pics you put on the site,I would say you are doing something right!! with your training,keep doing what your doing and just change it up a little,when you get bored with your routine to keep it interesting.dont let it get to complicated and put to much thought to it.Like Mentzer says This Aint Rocket Science! It Looks like your on the right track and one day maybe we'll have another Myth or Viator.
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AJFan

Just a quick point here - giving yourself the label "Hard Gainer" is not going to be good for your gains.

Avoiding that label can be difficult, though.

Beware of calling somebody else a hard gainer. Maybe they are, or maybe they haven't found the right way to train for their body yet.

AJFan, a hard gainer (dammit!)
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NeuroMass

AJFan wrote:
Just a quick point here - giving yourself the label "Hard Gainer" is not going to be good for your gains.



* Yeah and denying the reality of your genetic capabilities and limitations won't make you you Champion either. I don't think it all about BRANDING yourself it's just accepting your genetic limitations.

It's like being a short 5'4" guy, imagining yourself to be a 6 footer won't get you any taller.

Fortunately HARDGAINER doesn't imply that you are a NO GAINER. You can still build some muscle but only to a very limited degree.



Avoiding that label can be difficult, though.



* Accepting the FACT is a sign of maturity.



Beware of calling somebody else a hard gainer. Maybe they are, or maybe they haven't found the right way to train for their body yet.


* Only you can say if you are a HARDGAINER or not. If you have done practically everything you could do and still do not exhibit much progress (below average) then you are surely a HARDGAINER no doubt about it. On the otherhand if you are a FAST GAINER (gifted) gaining muscle would be no problem for you whatsoever.


AJFan, a hard gainer (dammit!)



PEACE.

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smanjh

To me, regardless of the potential at first, the majority becomes hardgainers after a certain point. It may be 30 pounds for some, 5 for others, but I feel we all get to a point that is very hard to get past after a year of proper training. I mean, it is bad to go about the "Oh, poor me, a hardgainer, oh no, I will never be huge" attitude and give up, but at the same time, the line is not like hardgainers on one side, the elite on the other, which is my point.

So, a hardgainer to me is 99% of the population, regardless of newbie gains because there comes a point where muscle does not want to grow on all of us.
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NickMunro

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Sesame wrote:
It's not about where you start it's where you finish! This time I do rest my case...See anybody you recognise?



Freddie Mercury at a G.A.Y meeting?
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Acerimmer1

I set em up you knock em down!
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eintology

California, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Sesame wrote:
Beauty is in eye of the beholder for most part but physiques like Dorian border on grotesque. It's TOO MUCH, imo! How much is too much? I think that too much!

My physique resembles..THIS!

http://tsunami.km.ua/...undgren_04.jpeg

Long, Lean, Muscular, Functional, Agile..
:)


I see your point:
I don't like Dolphs physique much myself but I can't accuse him of being grotesque. His acting however, that is a different kettle of fish entirely....And if he dies...He dies.


And if he should happen to die during the opening credits, it's not soon enough for me.

Dolph Lundgren is the enemy of theatrical talent.

Erik

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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
I just rented "The Machinist" this weekend. Christian Bale (the new Batman) at 120 lbs --- Geez! He looks grotesque.

If you want to see some contrast, rent "Equilibrium" at the same time. It's a half-decent SF flick from about 3 years ago, with CB at a good 180, maybe 190.

Scott


Oddly enough, I think Bale was in his best condition in American Psycho. He looked better in American Psycho than he did in Batman. He did an excellent job in Batman though. The whole "ninja" angle was interesting.

Drew Baye
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Sesame wrote:
I think you might be overstepping your knowledge at this point especially since you are not nor have you ever been a distance runner.


This is based on the experiences of several SS instructors who've worked with endurance athletes who've improved their performance doing just that.

In fact, in college my brother took an exercise and conditioning related course, and the instructor required the entire class to run regularly during the semester. My brother refused, and told the instructor that he was already doing other conditioning (at the time he was using SuperSlow HIT, once or twice a week, and doing NO running at all). At the end of the semester, everybody was tested on the 2-mile run. Bill's time was way below everyone elses in class except for one student who was there on a CC scholarship, and he was only a short way behind him.

Drew Baye
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eintology

California, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
I just rented "The Machinist" this weekend. Christian Bale (the new Batman) at 120 lbs --- Geez! He looks grotesque.

Scott


Scott,

120 lbs.? He's a few inches over six feet tall. Man, he must have been way beyond thin in that particular part.

If offered the role of a much heavier person; in comparison to his normal set point body weight, he would be able to get it together for that as well. Ralph Fiennes is also naturally very thin, as is the whole Fiennes family, but Ralph Fiennes gained a great deal of weight to play the Amon Goeth character in, "Schindler's List." It's not easy and probably fight a natural tendancy, but it can be done.

Scott, the Christian Bale example was a good one for exemplifying why I think this Hard Gainer issue is over blown.

Erik

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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

eintology wrote:
120 lbs.? He's a few inches over six feet tall. Man, he must have been way beyond thin in that particular part...

Scott, the Christian Bale example was a good one for exemplifying why I think this Hard Gainer issue is over blown.

Erik,

You have got to see it to believe it. He looks like one of those poor folks from the WWII concentration camps. His collarbones, ribs, and even vertebrae can all be seen in shocking detail.

I think his extreme results point a lot to what commitment and dedication can do for you. You're right, the HG thing's way overblown.

Ok kids, so you're not Casey. Tough break. Obviously, you will never get the total transformation that Dorian made without drugs. Are we clear on that? Good. Now shut-up and get to work.

Scott
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