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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Recovery Question For Drew
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hit4life

Virginia, USA

Drew, in your opinion is it possible at all for a person to need 11 or more days of rest in between full body workouts to recover? Lets say a workout of 6 exercises, one set a piece?
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

hit4life wrote:
Drew, in your opinion is it possible at all for a person to need 11 or more days of rest in between full body workouts to recover? Lets say a workout of 6 exercises, one set a piece?


Possible, but unlikely, assuming there are no physical problems and they are getting adequate sleep and nutrition and are not ill or under a significant amount of stress.

There will be exceptions on both sides. Some who require very, very little time to recover, and others who require far more than average.

If you can provide some more detailed info I'll see what I can do to help.

Drew Baye
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bill1

California, USA

This is not really that applicable , as it is somewhat isolated . From 1989 to 1996 , I did a lot of personal experimentation with a MedX lumbar and cervical testing machines. I found that with the cervical machine I made good gains with 2 - 3 workouts once a week. However with the lumbar machine if I worked out more than once every twelve or 14 days , I lost strength. I finally settled on a program of one workout every 10 days and was able to max out the full stack within 8 weeks.

I just began working out again ,not long ago, with a number of machines and I train twice a week ,full body, with the exception of the leg extension and the hip extension; which I use once every 7 days. While I am not even close to maxing out on any of the machines I train with twice a week , on the other 2 I am now close. This personal experience, along with a lot of published MedX research, has led me to conclude that recovery is not so much "systemic " as it is specific to a particular structure and it's own particular composition as far as fiber type is concerned. That is not to say that there is no systemic effect whatsoever , but it appears to me that how recovery of an isolated structure takes place is probably more important.

Bill
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karma50

Bill,
I've found (by accident,like everything else) that I recover faster in leg stuff than upper body. I think you're right on about localized recovery, and fiber type effects.

I do two full body/wk but on one routine I just do 2 leg exercises. What does your present routine look like? Do you ever do NTF stuff? We're about the same age (I'm 55) I think, so I'm interested in your input, due to your training and experience.

I've never tried cervical exercise more than once a week or so. I have no medx or nautilus stuff available locally. It's too bad, because I've got spinal/cervical arthritis. I think they could make some real money
helping us boomers. Oh, well.
Regards,
Griff
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bill1

California, USA

karma50 wrote:
Bill,
I've found (by accident,like everything else) that I recover faster in leg stuff than upper body. I think you're right on about localized recovery, and fiber type effects.

I do two full body/wk but on one routine I just do 2 leg exercises. What does your present routine look like? Do you ever do NTF stuff? We're about the same age (I'm 55) I think, so I'm interested in your input, due to your training and experience.

I've never tried cervical exercise more than once a week or so. I have no medx or nautilus stuff available locally. It's too bad, because I've got spinal/cervical arthritis. I think they could make some real money
helping us boomers. Oh, well.
Regards,
Griff


My routine currently consists of :

Hip extension 1 set 1x wk
Leg ext 1 set 1 x wk
Pullover 1 set 2 x wk
Chest cross ( fly ) 1 set 2 x wk
Lateral raise 1 set 2 x wk
Tricep ext 1 set 2 x wk
Bicep curl 1 set 2 x wk
Rotary torso 1 set 2 x wk
Calf raise 1 set 2 x wk

Occasionally , I'll throw in a set of wrist curls.

In a sense I am doing some NTF. On some of the exercises , leg ext, curl , tri ext , I utilize Negative Accentuated ( NA ) exercises, except that instead of alternating the negatives I work one limb to negative failure at each session , so the limb that is not doing any negative work that day gets an NTF workout. So far , so good. Yeah , were about the same age. The MedX neck machines are a great re-hab tool. The medical proffesion has traditionally been slow in adapting new methodology as far as exercise in general has been concerned.

It has only been a decade or so , since bed rest was routinely prescribed for high bp , heart conditions , low back pain, arthritis etc. Maybe MedX ought to do some direct pitching as the drug companys now routinely do. Good luck.

Bill
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HeavyHitter32

Bill,

Have you ever found the need to perform more than one exercise per muscle?

I have heard some complain that they look "flat" if only using one set per muscle. I know some have argued that one set per muscle may not be enough to deplete energy reserves, etc. which cause an increase in glycogen storages which causes the muscle to look more full.
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bill1

California, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Bill,

Have you ever found the need to perform more than one exercise per muscle?

I have heard some complain that they look "flat" if only using one set per muscle. I know some have argued that one set per muscle may not be enough to deplete energy reserves, etc. which cause an increase in glycogen storages which causes the muscle to look more full.


I have performed more than one exercise per muscle when I used to utilize pre-exhaust, and originally I did three sets per exercise in 1969/70, switching to 2 sets for a while and finally settling on 1 in 1979.

I make much better gains with 1 set and research supports this. I have some muscular structures that appear " flat " and others that do not, but this is due to shape determined by genetics and not training. Training volume past a certain point becomes aerobic , burning oxygen primarily , not glycogen. Especially if you are on the fast twitch side of the equation.

Bill
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karma50

Bill1
Your routine looks good. Does the hip ext. machine work hamstrings? I've never used one. If it does, you've pretty much covered the whole body with rotary exercises.

Also, what do you think of occasional drop sets? That is quickly lowering the weight for another set. I have read this technique may recruit additional fibers. Dr. Wescott has used this technique on some trainees to break plateaus.
Regards,
Griff
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HeavyHitter32

Bill,

Do you think the back thickness or rhomboids are taxed enough without doing rows? Is the pullover (or even pulldown) sufficient for this?
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bill1

California, USA

karma50 wrote:
Bill1
Your routine looks good. Does the hip ext. machine work hamstrings? I've never used one. If it does, you've pretty much covered the whole body with rotary exercises.

Also, what do you think of occasional drop sets? That is quickly lowering the weight for another set. I have read this technique may recruit additional fibers. Dr. Wescott has used this technique on some trainees to break plateaus.
Regards,
Griff


Yes , the Hip extension works the low back , glutes and hamstrings.

I tried drop sets in the 80s and found it was too much volume for me ,. I think it makes a deeper " inroad into starting levels of strength , but I don't think it utlizes more fibers, per se. Drew Baye suggested a different way to do drop sets , where you use a very heavy amount of resistance for the first rep and drop the weight with each succesive rep. This sounds very intriguing to me. Drew can probably explain how to apply this method much better than I can, as I have no experience with it.

Bill
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bill1

California, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Bill,

Do you think the back thickness or rhomboids are taxed enough without doing rows? Is the pullover (or even pulldown) sufficient for this?


Yes, for all " practical " purposes , however if you really want to focus on these muscles or specialize , then rowing would help.

I have very little room for equipment right now, but I am planning on moving in 2 years when my wife retires. I will have more space and I plan to add some Hammer and some MedX machines that will allow me to utilize compounds from time to time.


Bill
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