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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

Just curious how many have or are martial arts practioners , what kind and how long ?

I studied Uechi Ryu Karate Do for 4 years under a 3rd dan who got his training in Okinowa from the grandson of the founder. I started when I was 12 years old, at a time when most Americans thought Karate was some kind of Japanese food. There were only 4 colored belts , white , green , brown and black. It took years just to go from white to green.

Bill
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Finny McGee

Shootfighter,Gracie Brazilian Jujitsu -7 years -super middleweight
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

I was introduced to fitness through Martial Arts, I studied Ju-Jitsu since I was seven. I also kickboxed for a decade under the tutelage of world Middleweight Champion Jean Yves Theriault. He was a fitness nut and never got out of shape and I mean never. He had a body of cement 24/7.

I now incorporate my experience with such by utilizing DI-Chi to add fun and variety to my clients training programs. DI-Chi is basically a high intensity version of Ti-Chi and allows for a incredibly quick but exhausting workout session for those on the run.

Regards,
Andrew
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Studied Jeet Kune Do, Jun Fan Gung Fu, Inosanto Kali, Maphilindo Silat, Muay Thai, Shoot wrestling, and Wing Chun under Floyd Jackson, who is an instructor under Dan Inosanto, Surachai Sirisute, and Francis Fong.

Studied Pambuan Arnis under Ama Guro Raffy Pambuan

Studied Cheung Style Wing Chun under Jason Greuling, an instructor under William Cheung and Anthony Arnett

Learned a bit of Pekiti Tirsia from Kyle Barnette, who was one of my regular training partners at both the JKD and Pambuan Arnis schools.

Used to have classes or sparring several nights a week but with work and everyting else going on these days I only practice about 2 or 3 times a month.

Drew Baye
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Sesame

I have a heavybag hung at home. Kickboxing Tai style, mainly power strikes like low kicks, hooks, elbow & knee stikes.. nothing fancy just "straight at ya stuff!"

Work the bag for an hour almost every day usually @ 6:00am.
:)))

(Great cardio WO! Wonder how many cals this burns?)
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Max

Oklahoma, USA

I fight in mixed martial arts now, Ju-Jitsu, wrestling, Muay Thai and kickboxing. I'm hoping the have my first professional fight in November. I'm keeping my identity secret, a few of the guys on here might know me which might not be good : )

I also studied Tae Kwon-Do for about 10 years which I don't recommend. Unfortunately that seems to be the most popular where I'm from and that's what most parents are putting their kids into. Sure, it great for exercise and discipline but it gives the kids a false sense of security. That stuff looks great in the movies but try it in a real fight and you'll get your ass handed to you. I found out the hard way when I first got into MMA and all these guys would just take me down and pound the crap out of me or get me into a submission hold.

If your only looking for a workout and to have some fun then any form of martial arts is fine. But it you want to be a well rounded, effective fighter then the only forms of stand up fight I'd recommend are Muay Thai and kickboxing, plus some sort of ground fighting.
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SanSooMan

I studied Shank-Fu while at Pelican Bay. Just Kidding. Study and teach San Soo Kung Fu which is combat fighting. Hands down the most advanced and brutal system made by man. Not well known, however. The knock-off of San Soo is Jerry Peterson's SCARS or Tim Larkin's TFT. Also studied Judo and Sombo to first Dan level. Did other stuff too, but if your not ranked first Dan or above your not even a student, your just there. Chris
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Feb221732

Been studying Bujinkan Ninjutsu for 13 years now. The first nine years under Jeff Duncan who was directly under Bud Malmstrom out of Atlanta.(Bud is a direct student of soke Masaaki Hatsumi Noda City, Japan) The last four years under Doug Norman out of Macon, Ga. Like Drew, with work and school it is tough to train formally regularly.

But I train everyday in some way shape or form. Whether in my living room with a bokken, on the heavy bag in my garage, or basic Taijutsu around the house. My brother in law runs his own Dojo about an hour down the road and we get together to train as often as our schedules permit.

As soon as I finish my Bachelor's degree I intend to start a training group and hopefully one day my own Dojo wherever I decide to go to grad school.

Ted
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tylerg

Back in the 70's and early 80's I studied Judo. We moved and didn't do much till the early 90's when I joined the kids in Tae Kwon Dance, I mean Do (D'oh!). I agree with the earlier post that it is not recommended.

Late 90's till now, due to work requirements, I am involved in a school that teaches BJJ, Combat Sombo and Krav Maga. Found this to be a very practical combo, though in many respects, they are similar. My main focus is takedowns and ground fighting.

Tyler
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st3

Studied Tae Kwon Do when I was younger. Now I practice BJJ once per week with some friends. It doesn't kill my joints at my age(44) and its a good cardio workout!

Steve
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davise

Boxing, high school wrestling, judo, tae kwon do (worthless), Goju Ryu and the last few years really big into WWII combatives as practiced by Fairbairn, Applegate and Sykes. Check out www.close-combat-video.com
My favorite martial art lately is practicing point shooting with a handgun.
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

Drew Baye wrote:
Studied Jeet Kune Do, Jun Fan Gung Fu, Inosanto Kali, Maphilindo Silat, Muay Thai, Shoot wrestling, and Wing Chun under Floyd Jackson, who is an instructor under Dan Inosanto, Surachai Sirisute, and Francis Fong.

Studied Pambuan Arnis under Ama Guro Raffy Pambuan

Studied Cheung Style Wing Chun under Jason Greuling, an instructor under William Cheung and Anthony Arnett

Learned a bit of Pekiti Tirsia from Kyle Barnette, who was one of my regular training partners at both the JKD and Pambuan Arnis schools.

Used to have classes or sparring several nights a week but with work and everyting else going on these days I only practice about 2 or 3 times a month.

Drew Baye


There is a certified Jun Fan Gung Fu instuctor in town. I have been thinking about enrolling mainly because I am interested in trapping ; I am wondering about how practical " trapping " is in a real fight, what's your opinion ?

Bill
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

Max wrote:
I fight in mixed martial arts now, Ju-Jitsu, wrestling, Muay Thai and kickboxing. I'm hoping the have my first professional fight in November. I'm keeping my identity secret, a few of the guys on here might know me which might not be good : )

I also studied Tae Kwon-Do for about 10 years which I don't recommend. Unfortunately that seems to be the most popular where I'm from and that's what most parents are putting their kids into. Sure, it great for exercise and discipline but it gives the kids a false sense of security. That stuff looks great in the movies but try it in a real fight and you'll get your ass handed to you. I found out the hard way when I first got into MMA and all these guys would just take me down and pound the crap out of me or get me into a submission hold.

If your only looking for a workout and to have some fun then any form of martial arts is fine. But it you want to be a well rounded, effective fighter then the only forms of stand up fight I'd recommend are Muay Thai and kickboxing, plus some sort of ground fighting.


Yeah I agree Tae Kwon Do is a joke. I laugh everytime I see some guy doing a flying spin kick, and how many colored belts do they have now ? It took a while for me to learn that traditional karate had been killed by kata. ( Tae Kwon Do being Korean isn't really karate ) 95% of what I learned is useless. I agree that some kind of ground fighting is a good idea, it is something I am looking into.
I would like to learn Western boxing for self defense, but no one seems to teach it.

Bill

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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

I like Applegate's and Fairbairn's stuff, but I'm not a fan of point shooting.

Drew Baye
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

It works pretty well, but nothing like the choreographed stuff in the movies :)

Drew Baye
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

Drew Baye wrote:
I like Applegate's and Fairbairn's stuff, but I'm not a fan of point shooting.

Drew Baye


Looks like you have a pretty eclectic mix , whats your favorite ?

Bill
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tylerg

Drew Baye wrote:
I like Applegate's and Fairbairn's stuff, but I'm not a fan of point shooting.

Drew Baye


I prefer silhouette shootting, myself.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

If I had to choose one I'd take the Pambuan Arnis.

Drew Baye
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NickMunro

I studied Kickboxer, Hard to Kill and The Karate Kid as a boy in the 80s. Tried a Crane Kick once and hurt my neck.

I also did Aikido for a few years and enjoyed it a lot. The final year was the most practical - disarming people with weapons - on occasion we practiced with real knives and that was excellent.

At my dojo belts were not very important - I got one belt in 5 years of study, going two nights a week.

Whilst I thought Aikido was quite practical - I have never used any of it in a fight and to do so you would have to be practicing aikido regularly so that the moves come naturally.


Nick
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J.W.

Indiana, USA

Toyed with boxing a couple years in college. Was involved with Karate about 25 yrs ago, and have practice Jui Juitsu for about 15 yrs. Don't do too much of that anymore, however. I believe Jui Jutsu and Hapkedo to be the most practicle form of self-defense and unfortunately the toughest on your joints.

J.W.
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SanSooMan

davise wrote:
Boxing, high school wrestling, judo, tae kwon do (worthless), Goju Ryu and the last few years really big into WWII combatives as practiced by Fairbairn, Applegate and Sykes. Check out www.close-combat-video.com
My favorite martial art lately is practicing point shooting with a handgun.


If you like Applegate you'll love Target-Focused training. A knock-off of San Soo geared towards Spec. Ops. people. Taught by a former SEAL, Tim is very good. You will not find a more practical, effective system out there. The weapon disarms are second to none. Faster to learn than San Soo. TFTgroup.com
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

NickMunro wrote:
I studied Kickboxer, Hard to Kill and The Karate Kid as a boy in the 80s. Tried a Crane Kick once and hurt my neck.

I also did Aikido for a few years and enjoyed it a lot. The final year was the most practical - disarming people with weapons - on occasion we practiced with real knives and that was excellent.

At my dojo belts were not very important - I got one belt in 5 years of study, going two nights a week.

Whilst I thought Aikido was quite practical - I have never used any of it in a fight and to do so you would have to be practicing aikido regularly so that the moves come naturally.


Nick


What about the wrist locks in Aikido are they practical ? Do you know how they compare to other systems ? The whole quasi-religious aspect of Aikido has always put me off a bit.

Bill
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

I am pretty good at kicking and striking , but I have no grappling skills at all. I have very good upperbody strength which helps in a grappling situation ,but my strength dissapates rapidly, so I am looking for very effective and easy to use techniques. Any suggestions ?


Bill
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J.W.

Indiana, USA

Bill-

The easiest ones to learn are moves that emphasize wrist turns and joint locks to the elbow. There are a ton of moves you can do just focusing on the wrist. Good technique can help offset differences in strength and endurance. It is amazing how something so simple can hurt so back.
The key is simple body movements.

I believe you mentioned grappling also in an earlier post. I think a little bit is good to learn, but an over emphasis by one sensei I had really burnt me out eventually. We spent almost 6 solid month going over nothing but grappling. I felt I lost a lot my other more practical defensive skills while we rolled around on the ground.

Good luck.

J.W.
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NewYorker

New York, USA

I studied Kyokushin Karate under Saiko Shihan Shigeru Oyama for 1 1/2 years. Quit as a brown belt 2nd kyu. Good for your head. Very intense, almost cult-like.

He broke off from Mas Oyama and formed his own school "Oyama Karate". I know nothing about his new schools. Some consider Mas Oyama (deceased) a near deity.

Danny "Tiger" Schulman studied under S. Oyama, and opened a string of schools in the northeast.
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