MB Madaera
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Chris Madaera
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Keelan Parham
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Bob Marchesello
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Jeff Turner
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Jeanenne Darden
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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cmg

Hello All,

I had asked Casey about his volume approach in his book and he stated that the reason he wrote volume routines in the book is that most people cannot preform HIT routines properly and that it`s just to hard for most people.
He still trains HIT twice a week.


Regards,

Ron
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Josh0507

Pennsylvania, USA

That is good to hear. I bought Casey's book about a year ago, and I was wondering why he was talking about volume in there. I was expecting more about HIT, but I think he is correct in saying that it is either too hard for most people, or they would not perform it properly. I also think it would be a big turn off for a lot of people, once they see how hard it actually is. Nice to know he still trains HIT.

Josh
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NeuroMass

cmg wrote:
Hello All,

I had asked Casey about his volume approach in his book and he stated that the reason he wrote volume routines in the book is that most people cannot preform HIT routines properly and that it`s just to hard for most people.
He still trains HIT twice a week.


Regards,
Ron



So if that's the case is he now suggesting that a high volume training program is comparable or just as effective as a HIT program? How about the issue of workout volume in relation to recovery?

So what's he's saying is that he wrote the book not to convey his training theory (ideas) but just to cater to the convinience of his readers. I find his rational very disturbing because he should have stuck with what he really beleives in and not to readily presume what some people can and cannot do. In short he is willing to compromise his ideals just to sell some books!

PEACE.





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waynekr

Whats this yo saying to me? You know Casey? Why did you say that to me?????

did you ask him about my tricep routine - it is the only way to go full stop.

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Sesame

The Nautilus machine truly revolutionized the world of pump and muscle. It became "the thinking man's barbell" for good reason. The machine can give better results in 90-minutes of well-targeted exercise per week than would be possible from 20 hrs of conventional weightlifting.

Jones gives this analogy:

"It takes only one properly placed shot to kill an elephant. Additional shots will serve no purpose except unnecessary destruction of the meat."

http://www.tropicjungle.com/tj...




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Growl

cmg wrote:
Hello All,

I had asked Casey about his volume approach in his book and he stated that the reason he wrote volume routines in the book is that most people cannot preform HIT routines properly and that it`s just to hard for most people.
He still trains HIT twice a week.


Regards,

Ron


I have heard the same thing Ron, but I can't remember where. I don't know Casey, but I don't think I would trust him for training advice. Did he let people know in his book that he trained HIT? I wonder if Jones was thinking of Casey each time he cautioned the masses against asking some genetically gifted man how to train.

Jeff

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mentzerfan

waynekr wrote:
Whats this yo saying to me? You know Casey? Why did you say that to me?????

did you ask him about my tricep routine - it is the only way to go full stop.



What is your tricep routine Wayne? I really want to go full stop too (although I suspect this might be illegal).
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NeuroMass

Growl wrote:
cmg wrote:
Hello All,

I had asked Casey about his volume approach in his book and he stated that the reason he wrote volume routines in the book is that most people cannot preform HIT routines properly and that it`s just to hard for most people.
He still trains HIT twice a week.


Regards,

Ron

I have heard the same thing Ron, but I can't remember where. I don't know Casey, but I don't think I would trust him for training advice. Did he let people know in his book that he trained HIT? I wonder if Jones was thinking of Casey each time he cautioned the masses against asking some genetically gifted man how to train.

Jeff



Yeah and the funny thing is even Arthur Jones wasn't consistent either! He was so adamant (and rightly so)in cautioning ohters against asking a genetically gifted individuals how to properly train and yet he utilize Casey Viator who is one of the most gifted bodybuilder ever to promote and showcase the efficacy of HIT and his Nautilus innovations!

Think about it, if he really wanted to CLEARLY demonstrate the superiority of HIT he should have utilized someone with average genetics to show his ideas worked.

PEACE.

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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Sesame wrote:
Jones gives this analogy:

"It takes only one properly placed shot to kill an elephant. Additional shots will serve no purpose except unnecessary destruction of the meat."

http://www.tropicjungle.com/tj...



Cool little article, but I could do w/o the James Bond theme on the Casio.
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Ayirakaz R

Sesame wrote:
Jones gives this analogy:

"It takes only one properly placed shot to kill an elephant. Additional shots will serve no purpose except unnecessary destruction of the meat."


What is this analogy's relevance to weight-training? The same goes for Mike Mentzer's dynamite analogy. I've never seen them explained.

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2phat

The relevence is easy to discern. It only takes one set (to failure) to stimulate muscular growth and any additional sets merely impeed progress.
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Ayirakaz R

2phat wrote:
The relevence is easy to discern. It only takes one set (to failure) to stimulate muscular growth and any additional sets merely impeed progress.


But how can hypertrophic adaptations be related to killing animals or detonating dynamite?
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SGP

Illinois, USA

It?s an analogy of mathematics. 1 well placed shot is all it takes to kill an animal, 1 well placed strike is all it takes to set off dynamite, 1 properly performed set of exercise is all it takes to stimulate muscle growth.
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NeuroMass

Ayirakaz R wrote:
2phat wrote:
The relevence is easy to discern. It only takes one set (to failure) to stimulate muscular growth and any additional sets merely impeed progress.

But how can hypertrophic adaptations be related to killing animals or detonating dynamite?


Yeah I've heard this analogy a million times before and I think it doesn't really reflect the muscle growth process at all! The analogy is quite vague and simplistic. I think a more specific and more accurate analogy was made by M. Doug McGuff where he compared MUSCLE GROWTH STIMULATION to the DOSE RESPONSE principle in Medicine wherein the body responds best when given the precise amount of drugs not less not more but the precide amount. But then even the DOSE RESPONSE doesn't only pretain to one factor. When a Doctor prescribes drugs to a patient he NEVER gives out the HIGHEST POSSIBLE dosage all at once and he also doesn't say to take it once a week. In fact thier are always 3 factors involved which are the OPTIMUM dose (amounts), the frequency and the duration are all taken into accont for best results.

Also Mike use the analogy of TANNING to the muscle growth process saying that like tanning you need to have enough intensity (of the sun) to stimulate the melanin of the skin to produce a tan and over exposure to the sun will lead to sun burn or as he related it to bodybuilding OVERTRAINING. Well guys when was the last time you've seen somebody tanning at VERY HIGH INTENSITY SUN EXPOSURE or as I refer to it as TANNING TO FAILURE ? I guess never!

PEACE.

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glenn_001

New Zealand

NeuroMass wrote:

Also Mike use the analogy of TANNING to the muscle growth process saying that like tanning you need to have enough intensity (of the sun) to stimulate the melanin of the skin to produce a tan and over exposure to the sun will lead to sun burn or as he related it to bodybuilding OVERTRAINING. Well guys when was the last time you've seen somebody tanning at VERY HIGH INTENSITY SUN EXPOSURE or as I refer to it as TANNING TO FAILURE ? I guess never!

PEACE.



Very high intensity tanning?
That called a solarium.
Also as you get more tanned your skin can tolerate higher frequency of visits so its really a bad analogy Mike used.
Glenn
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gekkoca

CV: I use HIT in every workout and also advise people on my website to train in this fashion as well. My training has not changed in years and usually I do a 2-day-on-one-day-off, 2-day-on- weekends-off.

For example: Monday (chest, biceps, calves); Tuesday (shoulders, full leg workout); Wednesday (off); Thursday (upper and lower back, triceps, calves); Friday (priority day, which is working body parts that are lagging behind to improve your symmetry).

My workouts last no more than 45 minutes to 1 hour, so I am moving fast to complete everything. Many of my clients follow the same routine, although the whole body workouts are still recommended for extra growth
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bar

gekkoca wrote:
CV: I use HIT in every workout and also advise people on my website to train in this fashion as well. My training has not changed in years and usually I do a 2-day-on-one-day-off, 2-day-on- weekends-off.

For example: Monday (chest, biceps, calves); Tuesday (shoulders, full leg workout); Wednesday (off); Thursday (upper and lower back, triceps, calves); Friday (priority day, which is working body parts that are lagging behind to improve your symmetry).

My workouts last no more than 45 minutes to 1 hour, so I am moving fast to complete everything. Many of my clients follow the same routine, although the whole body workouts are still recommended for extra growth


Gekkoca are you Casey Viator? Your post is similar to a interview I read.
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