MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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bittabit

Who closes their eyes when lifting to focus on form. Not all the time, but when I get to the point where I am near fatigued and it is all I can do to keep form, I close my eyes and focus on the muscle group that needs to work. Is this crazy?

What are some of your tips and strategies to keep form.

I workout in my garage and have no mirror and no one working out with me.

Michelle

Also I checked my heart rate after a workout and it was around 130 beats a minute is this good? No rest between exercises.
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ben1

No i sometimes close my eyes when it gets real tough!
Plus some people look at me funny when i'm breathing real heavy and sweating bucketloads, as if i'm doing something crazy!!
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ben1

No i sometimes close my eyes when it gets real tough!
Plus some people look at me funny when i'm breathing real heavy and sweating bucketloads, as if i'm doing something crazy!!
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waynegr

Switzerland

Hi there all,

Yep I close my eyes when training, about hmm, 80% of the time, it lets me concentrate and focus far more, I tried this on running to concentrate more but it did not seem to work, hehehe.

Thank you Wayne
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bittabit

So I am not insane then, well at least not in this respect. Good luck with the running wayne...just a tip, open fields buddy.

Oh and on a side note, took my measurements today. After two weeks of training and watching my diet, I lost....

1 inch - chest
2 inches - waist
1/4 inch - hips
3/4 inch - each thigh
3.4 Pounds

Talk about motivation! I actually feel better about myself even though I still have a ways to go.

Michelle
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tylerg

No, you're not insane. I often do this and visualize the proper form so I have something to go by (I workout at home also and no mirrors).

I think you are making great progress, keep up the good work.

Keep us posted with your progress.

Tyler
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chaos138

Florida, USA

I keep mine open. If I look at the loaded muscles I feel I'm better able to focus on contracting them. Plus, when I close my eyes I find i'm more likely to squint my face.

Brian
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Richard Glover

No you're obviously not the only one Michelle! I know a fella who uses a blindfold - a bit kinky - but hey, If it works for him who can knock it!

Personally, I have a friend and mentor train me - it always feels like a superior workout. Added motivation (someone watching seems to have that effect), form checking (breathing, rep cadence) and the partner can do time/rep counts and record them while you move quickly to the next exercise. I feel I can focus more (as I know errors will be called out) & thus inroad as much as possible!! Highly recommended. Oh, and personally I don't close my eyes.

Rich
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bittabit

Richard Glover wrote:
I know a fella who uses a blindfold - a bit kinky - but hey,
Rich



Yes but does he handcuff himself to the weights.... ;)
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HamsFitness

This interests me alot - i think most trainees are visual people - the ones who close their eyes are internal visual people and the ones that open them are external visual people.

Internal - when people tell you stuff you can visualise it

External - you can visualise it but it is better if physically see something (hence watching the contraction works best for you!

Visualisation is very important with training.
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bittabit

I never thought of it that way Wizard, however; in my case you could be right. I have always used visualization techniques, in team sports, studies and acting. I suppose it would naturally spill over to lifting.

Good observation,
Michelle
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Landau

Florida, USA

Not sure if I keep my eyes open or shut, the weight is so nasty/heavy from the first rep, that all my senses are dulled. I do believe I keep my eyes open, but after the first exercise I don't see too well and don't see well anyways. David
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althaur

I usually keep my eyes open. I like to be able to see what I'm doing. I can't focus as well with them closed.

I've tried running on the treadmill with them closed. Ahem, not a pretty sight. I hit the STOP buttone pretty quickly. :)

As far as the heartrate. That will probably vary from person to person. Mine is usually up around 180 beats per minute by the time I'm done. I'm used to keeping it ar or around 170 beats per minute for cardio also though. Only the HIT workout makes me feel like upchucking though.

Josh
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

I have found that some exercises require open eyes to better maintain balance. You do receive much visual information to maintain such. It does help in some instances to close eyes to increase focus and concentration however you can do the same by picking a single small spot to stair at during a set. If you practice looking at a spot and item by item blocking out all other things in your line of vision, then reverse you will notice how it helps. I do this with myself and clients regularly to enhance workouts as it takes little time and works wonders after you get good at it. Once adept you can have fun with it, here's my basic routine:

Practice the exercise as you are in position to start your first set. Go in and out a few times (whole visual perspective down to a point and back, finishing and holding at the point) as you first empty your mind then think of things that make you feel aggressive. I kid you not with a bit of practice the effect is obvious.

The mind controls the body with regards to exercise and is a major tool to hone. There is a great section in "APEX" on such things and from what I understand Johnston will be coming out with a video based on the "Mind-Muscle connection early in the New Year.

On another note Michelle, I have a small suggestion for you. I realize you are working hard to shed unwanted fat but remember there is always a point of diminishing returns.

To that end, I would suggest you start thinking about a split where you do lower body in circuit style (little or no rest) one day and a standard upper body session on another. That is, upper body specifically aimed at building muscle (rest periods added etc.). You will still burn calories and can perform a full body circuit on the third day. So, Legs circuit/Upper Body standard/ Full Body circuit. Just something I have noticed works well with females with your specs and goals after their break in period. The legs carry most of your muscle anyway and usually have good endurance characteristics.

The shock and alarm of what you have started doing to your body will be wearing off and mixed with a relatively low cal. diet slowing/stagnation will be just around the corner. Rather than continuing to have to be ultra strict with diet (which I find often sets people up for problematic issues) a switch in approach right as you see changes slow may keep the ball rolling. Furthermore, in the long run you will benefit from evening out your physique as far as muscularity goes. In many ways more muscle and good symmetry make it far easier to stay lean.

A muscle-building day will allow for a higher calorie day and keep your body from catching on to what you are doing. Unless one is quite obese, it doesn't take long for the body to see ramped up fat loss as a problem that it will need to solve for safeties sake. Guys, on sights like this, often miss that to some extent as when you are more evenly and heavily muscled it is far easier to get lean.

Guys to some degree suffer a different fate. Being larger and more muscular, their bodies tend to ask for great quantities of food at times. Sort of like inspiring them to go out and hunt ;^) Mixed with a stretched stomach from large meals, habit and possibly less endurance (relative to a female and thus slightly less active) they must learn to be comfortable will smaller meals. We still need to heed the message of the need for a good meal but not to go overboard when doing so.

Both sexes seem to suffer the addictive effects of the nice brain chemicals released as a result of food, but that's another story.

Regards,
Andrew
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

AShortt wrote:

Both sexes seem to suffer the addictive effects of the nice brain chemicals released as a result of food, but that's another story.



Mmmmmm...donuts
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

simon-hecubus wrote:
AShortt wrote:

Both sexes seem to suffer the addictive effects of the nice brain chemicals released as a result of food, but that's another story.



Mmmmmm...donuts


That's right Homer and chocolate sweet sinful chocolate ;^)

Regards,
Andrew
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bittabit

Thanks Andrew,

I will keep that in mind. I had decided, after reading some of your other input, to stagger my calorie input. I average 1700 a week but have some 1100 days and some 2000 days. I have found that this works great for me. I find myself less fixated on food so able to maintain a more healthy perspective on food choices and timing of meals.

I had also decided to change my routine every two weeks. I just changed to a push/pull routine from one of Dr.Dardens books. I am now able to use more weight as I have not been feeling any pain during my workouts.

When I change my routine in two weeks maybe I will design a split. I have never done one before. I have always done full body three non consecutive days. I will have to read up on some variables.

As always your input is greatly appreciated. Makes me wish I lived closer. Ahhh but then again, I LOVE BC.

Michelle
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