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How Big Is Your Neck?
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SanSooMan

Dr. Darden,
do have any opinions about neck size and EIH? Most of my clients who get EIH are small women with even smaller necks. I've never seen someone with a halfway decent neck get EIH. Thanks, Chris.
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Ellington Darden

Chris,

Yes, I believe you are correct. A larger, stronger neck helps prevent exercise-induced headaches.

Ellington
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Ciccio

Ellington Darden wrote:
Chris,

Yes, I believe you are correct. A larger, stronger neck helps prevent exercise-induced headaches.

Ellington


That's an interresting point as I remember that I had some probs with EID years back only when I just begun lifting heavy (especially squat and leg press).
My neck was a good deal smaller then and surely not that strong.

Franco

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marcrph

Portugal

I appreciate Mr. Earle Liederman being used as a model of neck development. He was a classic ironman in his day.

I have followed "some" of his suggestions in my lifetime! I had a 14" neck in my earlier years. I now wear 19" shirts.
Beware of what you ask for. You just might get it.

I'm not one to put words in a person's mouth, so here is what Mr. Earle Liederman really said about neck development.


Muscle Building - Chapter 3 - The Structure and Development of the Neck
By Earle E. Liederman


A short time ago I was talking on physical development to a well-known
athlete. This man had broken into the game as a hammer-thrower and
shot-putter during is college career, but subsequently wound up as one the
best mat artists in the country.

He had a magnificent development, which I admired very much, so we got to
discussing the various things that go to build up a powerful physique that is
"easy to look at."

In the course of the conversation this man said to me: "you can talk as you
please, but I as an athlete judge a man's development more by the size and
contour of his neck than by any other way. For what a man is, and what he
has done, shows up in his neck, and in the full, firm contour of these
muscles just as thought he had drawn a map for you."

What my friend said is true, for the neck is one part of the body that
responds very rapidly to exercise, and a well-developed neck is not only
pleasing to the eye, but helps greatly to convey a better blood supply to the
brain. The, too, it has its advantages in the event of a fall, for a strong
neck is not as apt to break as a weak one. In order to develop the neck to
pleasing proportions, a great variety of movements must be gone through, for
much finer results can be accomplished by varying the movements than if the
student simply performed one or two exercises.

Don't Try to Choke Yourself

The wearing of tight collars retards neck development. Collars should be
worn comfortably, not too loose so as to look untidy. Soft collars are much
better to wear than stiffed starched collars, for they allow greater freedom
of movement. If you observe people's necks, you will see hundreds of
different sizes and shapes before you have looked very far. Some are so
fleshy in the back that a great many wrinkles can be seen. Others are
exceedingly fleshy in front, causing one to two extra chins. Necks that are
stringy and appear to have two ugly cords running towards the top of the head
in the back are not uncommon. Prominent "Adam's apples" and scrawny, cordy
appearances are often seen in the front of the neck.

I have always contended that there is absolutely no excuse for anyone to have
a scrawny or ungainly looking neck, when a few minutes devoted every day to
the care and welfare of this part of the body would not only make the pupil
feel better, but would change his appearance completely. Double chins can
easily be removed with properly applied exercise.

It is not necessary for anyone to develop his neck to the huge proportions of
a wrestler's, unless he so desires, but if properly applied exercises are
devoted especially to the trapezius muscle in the back and also to the
sterno-cleido-mastoid at the sides of the neck, symmetrical lines will make
their appearance in a very short space of time.

When exercising the neck, care should be taken not to apply the resistance
too vigorously, for sometimes the muscles are over-strained and a kink in the
neck is a very unpleasant feeling and lasts for several days. Begin all neck
movements slowly.

Neck Movements Should Be Done Slowly in Order to See the Greatest Possible
Benefit

Do not perform any of them in a jerky manner, and be careful to avoid strain.
The resistance applied behind the head for development of the head in the
back should be done in an even steady manner. The first movement should be
much lighter than the second, and second movement lighter than the third,
until about the fifteenth or twentieth count, when the strongest pressure
should be applied. By devoting special attention to the back of the neck,
you straighten the appearance of your spine and eliminate the hollows between
the occipital bone in the back of the head and upper dorsal vertebrae, which
gives the appearance of round shoulders.

By having the neck developed straight in the back, the appearance of the
student will be greatly improved, owing to his erect, military posture. By
paying attention also to the sterno-cleido-mastoid muscles, at the sides of
the neck it will help square out the neck and give the straight, athletic
lines so commonly noticed in anyone who does a great amount of athletic work.

Modern fashions in collars tend to hide the defects in people's necks.
Therefore, the time to look at the neck critically, is when people are in
bathing suits. Then the real truth comes out. For instance, a neck may look
fairly pleasing to the eye with a high collar on, but when the high collar
comes off, the neck will be found very defective in the lower part, owing to
the poor development of the trapezius muscle. Head-circling, turning and
twisting, and bending from side to side are common movements for the neck and
this light work will help greatly, when combined with scientifically applied
neck movements, towards a symmetrical development. Performing the wrestler's
bridge is also excellent for strength purposes, and will help greatly towards
further development.

The Size of the Head Is an Important Factor

The size and shape of the head is an important factor in neck development, as
I have said before. A person with a narrow face and a long, narrow head
cannot and must not expect to obtain the same size neck as a person whose
features are of a bull-dog type; that is, square or round. However, such
people need not be discouraged, for their necks can be developed from 15 1/2
to 16 1/2 inches, depending, of course, upon the height of the individual. A
person who has a large head and large features naturally requires a much
larger neck to harmonize with the rest of his body than his narrow-type
friend. Such individuals can acquire necks from 16 1/2 to 18 1/2 inches,
depending again upon the height of the individual.

I have always been thankful that I have developed a strong, muscular neck,
for I remember once while bathing in a swimming pool at Long Beach,
California, I took a high dive, without any thought as to the depth of the
water, and hit the bottom with such force that my arm was thrown against my
shoulder and my head hit the bottom so hard and at such an angle, that not
only did I have a lump on top of my head the size of a small apple, but my
neck and shoulder pained me for many days thereafter. I am positive that if
my neck had been weak at this time, it would have snapped. In fact, as every
reader of these pages knows, it is not at all uncommon to hear of divers
breaking their necks when hitting bottom.

Don't Stock Up Too Heavily on Collars and Shirts

To a person who is desirous of increasing the size of the neck, I suggest
that he do not stock up too freely with shirts and collars, for you will find
that every week or two you will have to get larger sizes. However, there is
no need to fear developing your neck to enormous or ungainly proportions.
For when your neck is large enough to suit yourself, all you have to do is
stop development work, and just do light work, such as twisting or turning
the neck. This will keep the neck in shape and it will not get any larger.

One of the first places which will tell the condition of an athlete is the
back of his neck. When an athlete starts slipping backwards it is usually
accompanied by the thinning out ot the posterior part of the neck.

One of the largest necks I have ever seen on any well-trained athlete was
that of George Hackenschmidt, the former world's champion wrestler.
Hackenschmidt weighed about 215 pounds, stripped, at the time, with an
exceptionally large frame and head. His neck measured 22 1/2 inches.
Stanislaus Zbyszko, the noted wrestler, also has a neck that measures well
over 20 inches.

However, one of the most remarkable tests of strength I have ever seen put to
the neck was when Joseph Vitole, a small, 150-pound athlete, lifted from the
floor 550 pounds with his teeth alone. Think of the remarkable bull-dog grip
this miniature Hercules possessed at he time of this lift. I particularly
noticed the great strain and the manner in which the muscles of the neck
bulged outward at the time I saw him make this world's record-breaking lift.
Vitole has a neck measuring about 17 inches, but the muscles are of
exceptionally fine quality.

Don't Let Your Hair Grow Too Far Down on Your Neck

Now, here's a little secret. If you want to add to the appearance of your
neck, do not permit the hair to grow too far down the back, but always keep
the hair neatly trimmed. This will not only give you a cleaner appearance
from the rear, but it will enable your neck muscles to present their best
appearance.

I also want to tell you that by properly applied exercises to the front of
the neck, a prominent "Adam's apple" can be made to appear smaller, and all
excess flesh under the chin can be eliminated. To my mind nothing is more
pleasing to the eye than to see a well-set jaw and chin, backed up by a
well-developed neck. You surely know that the way you carry your head makes
a wonderful difference in your posture and in your personality. So do not
allow your head to drop forward, but endeavor to keep it erect at all times.
Remember, that constantly forcing the chin downward will cause wrinkles in
the front of the neck, whereas, on the contrary, by constantly holding the
chin high in the air, you will have a tendency to cause wrinkles in the back
of the neck. My best advice is to study yourself in the mirror, not for the
sake of vanity, but for the purpose of looking for improvement and benefiting
your appearance.

I may say right here that one reason most singers develop two or more chins
is that they are constantly exercising the neck muscles with the lower jaw
abnormally relaxed. It's difficult for them to avoid this, for they really
have to relax these jaw muscles, while at the same time they are putting a
certain amount of tension on the neck muscles.

However, you or any other athlete can avoid this, if you will only bear the
following instructions in mind.

Exercises for the Neck

l. Clasp your hands behind the head while sitting or standing erect. Now
pull the head forward, strongly resisting at the same time with the muscles
of the neck. Make as complete a movement as possible, beginning from an erect
posture, and pull the head forward as far as the muscles will allow it to go.
This will strengthen and develop the trapezius muscle and give straightness
to the back of the neck. Variations on this exercise can be made by first
holding the chin in, and again sticking the chin out while performing the
movement.

2. Place your right hand on the right side of head, and push the head as far
as you can to the left, resisting meanwhile with the muscles of the neck.
This exercise will develop the sterno-cleido-mastoid muscle and give the neck
a square appearance when viewed from the front. Do the same with left hand
and push the head to the right.

Neither of the two above exercises should be performed less than fifteen
counts nor more than twenty-five counts. If the pressure is applied too
vigorously, and the muscles become tired in less than fifteen repetitions,
there may be a tendency to strain some part of the muscle and cause a very
unpleasant kink in the neck. If such a kink is ever experienced, massage the
part thoroughly and give the muscle a rest for a few days.

Twisting the head from side to side, bending it forward and backward, bending
it from right to left, are excellent movements for limbering up the muscles
of the neck, before applying the resistance work mentioned. The neck is one
part of the body that is very susceptible to exercise, and if the student is
desirous of enlarging this part of the body, with the proper application of
resistance, there is no reason why he should not be able to gain an inch or
more around the neck in thirty days.

The wrestler's bridge, as I said before, is also of great benefit for
strengthening the neck in general. This exercise consists of resting your
entire weight on the head and feet alone while the back makes an arch. By
raising and lowering the hips while in this position, and by walking a few
inches towards the head and back again, the neck will experience quite a
variation of movements. A few minutes' daily work in this bridging will
greatly help the further progress of neck development.

I want to emphasize again that the neck presents a very interesting subject
to the student of anatomy. The most ungainly looking necks are those lacking
in development of the trapezius muscle in the back, causing two hideous cords
to run upwards into the hair. This is more prominent in thin people when
they bend the heads slightly forward. Such cords can be entirely eliminated
with proper application to the back of the neck.

You will frequently find individuals with two or three chins, which can
easily be removed by proper application of exercise to the front part of the
neck. You will also find prominent "Adam's apple," which can be reduced
considerably by developing the muscles of the neck. The person who has never
exercised the neck does not have a pleasing contour, especially when without
a collar, or when in a bathing or gymnasium costume. Instead of having
well-formed, straight, pleasing contour to the muscles, the
sterno-cleido-mastoid, and the trapezius seem to grow inward at the bottom of
the neck, causing the neck to have a smaller appearance at he bottom than at
the top, when on the contrary the neck should be larger at the bottom than at
the top.

Professional wrestler's necks, although oftentimes over-developed, have
excellent contour, and no matter which way their heads are turned, or
carried, they present a pleasing appearance. Yet anyone can obtain the same
contour in the neck which professional wrestlers have, without the
over-development which gives the bull-like appearance. A well-developed neck
means an increased blood supply to the brain.

This gives the owner a clearer thinking capacity, owning to the enlargement
of the veins and arteries inside of the neck.

All neck exercises, as I said before, should be performed from fifteen to
twenty-five counts. Any work that is more vigorous and tires the muscles
with a less number of repetitions than this, will be apt to strain the
ligaments and muscles, so that painful results might follow. You must not
force the development of the neck as vigorously as you would the arms. Such
strenuous measures, however, are unnecessary; for, as I have previously
stated, the neck responds rapidly to properly applied activity. At about the
twentieth count, the amount of resistance to the neck should cause the
muscles to begin to ache, so that by the twenty-fifth repetition, the aching
point should cause the student to naturally discontinue.

I wish to make it very clear that I consider the development of the neck of
very great importance. So do not get the idea into your head that you should
or specialize in the development of your arms, shoulders, and chest. In all
my work I aim at a perfect, symmetrical development, and, in my opinion,
there is nothing of greater importance in physical development than the
development of the muscles of your neck.

Have a nice day

Marc
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marcrph

Portugal

This is what Mr. Earle Liederman said on how to measure the neck circumference.



Muscle Building - Chapter 2 - The Ideal Measurements
By Earle E. Liederman

I was down in Florida one winter at a time when quite a bunch of motion
picture stars and professional people were vacationing at the winter
playground. A little crowd of us were gathered on the beach doing various
athletic stunts--and believe me, some of those chaps were mighty clever.
After we got tired of our sport, we sat around on the sand talking, and
finally the subject came up as to what should be the ideal measurements for
a man.

One of the party spoke up and said: "This is a subject that is hard to agree
upon. The proportions of the old Greek sculptors for men varied a great
deal. For instance, take the Farnese Hercules, the Apollo Belevedere, the Laocoon
group--there's such a wide margin of variation that you have to accept
measurements based on some given type.

"While all women can aspire, at some given age, to the Venus de Milo, or the
Juno type, to classify a man for accurate measurements you have to picture
him as one of three or four very distinct types. And naturally, his
measurements will correspond with the ideal measurements of some particular
type."

I then spoke up and said: "My ideal is not the man with the huge, abnormal
muscles of a Hercules; nor is it the lithe, slender form of an Apollo, nor
the somewhat better muscled Mercury. I like to see big, firm muscles,
combined with speed and flexibility. The question goes even deeper than
this. When holding up an ideal for scores of thousands to copy after, we
set the following requisites:

"A man should look good from every angle. He should have curves and contour
rather than great, disfiguring ridges of muscles. He should have a
development which is possible for attainment by almost any average boy or
young man, who will apply himself to development and cultivate strength,
speed and perfect health."

This made quite an impression on the crowd, and suggested to me the title of
this chapter.

The Ideal to Which You Should Aspire

Now, I want to say right here that it is exceedingly difficult to set any
standard of measurements which the student can use as a guide for comparison
in order to determine to what extent he should develop his muscles. When
you take into consideration the different sizes of the bones of different
individuals, and combine this with hereditary conditions, it is, in my
opinion, practically impossible to set any standard of proportion where each
part of the body will bear its proper relation to the others. Even though
the student should not obtain these relative proportions, still there is no
reason why he cannot possess a beautiful physique by approaching the
following, which is my idea of how a man should be proportionately built:

Average Height - 5 feet 8 inches to 5 feet 9 inches
Neck - 17 inches
Biceps - 16 inches
Calf - 15 inches
Chest Normal - 44 inches
Waist - 32 inches
Thigh - 23 1/2 inches

My reason for mentioning the neck, upper arms and calves first is that the
common conception of Grecian proportions stipulates the neck, upper arm
flexed, and calf to be of the same size, with which I do not agree, If an
individual possessed a 17 inch neck, and a 17 inch arm, he would undoubtedly
possess a phenomenal development. But if he had a 17 inch calf, it would
spoil his proportions, as it would make him look much too heavy in the legs.

I have found by observation and careful study that the athletes who taper
down slightly are more pleasing to look upon than those whose legs are of
huge dimension, like the Farnese Hercules, for instance. Therefore, in
order to taper down, the neck should be a little larger than the arm, and the
arm a little larger than the calf.

Now, if a person has a 16 inch neck, his arm should measure 15 inches, and
his calf about 14 inches. If the individual has any smaller measurements
than these, taking for granted that he is of average height, he would be too
slim a type to attract attention in the physical culture world, as far as
strength and development are concerned. A man with an 18 inch neck, and a
17 inch arm , and a 16 inch calf would be very gigantic in size and undoubtedly
he would be exceptionally strong.

You very seldom see 17 inch arms and 18 inch necks or persons of average
height, for athletes possessing these enormous measurements usually are in
the neighborhood of a 6 feet tall. There are, of course, many exceptions to
this, especially among wrestlers.

For instance, George Hackenschmidt had an enormous neck. I have seen
measurements for this part of his body and therse measurements are given by
different authorities all the way from 19 1/2 inches to 22 inches.
Unfortunately I have not had the pleasure of measuring Mr. Hackenschmidt,
consequently I do not care to express my opinion of the actual size of his
neck. However, I did have the pleasure of feeling his arm, and although my
own hands are of medium size, still I could not span the breadth of his
upper arm when I felt it. I have seen measurements of his upper arm given by
different authorities as being anywhere from 18 inches to 19 1/2 inches.
The reader will, therefore, note that no matter how Hackenschmidt's measurements
may vary in accordance with different writers, still everyone mentions the
difference between the neck and the upper arms.

Hackenschmidt was a rare exception in muscular development and strength, and
I want to make it clear that no matter how diligently a person may work,
there is not one athlete in ten thousand who would ever acquire
Hackenschmidt's proportions and strength.

The Size of the Head Is an Important Factor

The size of the head is an important factor covering neck measurements.
Therefore, if the individual has a long, narrow head, and is of a slender
type, it will be a physical impossibility for him ever to attain s neck much
over 17 inches, providing, of course, he is of average height. By average
height, I mean people ranging from 5 feet 7 inches to 5 feet 9 inches. If
the individual is near 6 feet, or even over, naturally he will have larger
measurements than the individual of only average height. However, if he is
below the average in height, say 5 feet 3 or 4 inches, he must not expect to
attain the measurements of an individual of 5 feet 9 inches in height. In
other words, the taller you are, the larger your measurements should be,
providing, of course, that you adopt scientific progressive training and
work faithfully to reach your goal.

Although I mentioned 44 inches normal chest measurement, yet it is
exceedingly difficult to standardize any chest measurement to correspond
with a 17 inch neck, for, owing to the different formation of everyone's torso,
the measurement of the chest varies as much as 4 inches in the normal girth.
Greater variation will be found in the expanded chest measurement. All I
can say on the subject is that anyone with a 17 inch neck and a 16 inch upper
arm when flexed, should have a chest normal of over 43 inches.

The waist also varies in size according to the frame and width of the hips,
and also the muscular development of the individual. A student who has
devoted considerable attention to his waist muscles, especially those at the
sides of his waist and lower back, naturally will have at least an inch
larger waist than a person who has neglected this part of his body, taking
for granted, of course, that the waist is free of all superfluous flesh.

Again, the height of the individual is an important factor in the size of
the waist measurement. A 6-foot man with a waist measuring less than 33 inches
would, in my opinion, appear weak, while a man of average height, whose
waist measured less than 31 inches, would also appear weak. On the other hand, if the individual was but 5 feet 3 or 4 inches in height, and if he possessed a
waist of 27 or 28 inches, he would still be in splendid proportions.

I Failed to Reach My Earlier Ideal

I have often thought how discouraged a student must be who has exercised
faithfully month after month, and even for several years, and failed to
reach the measurements he had set in mind as his goal. I can only tell you the
story of my own experience, which undoubtedly corresponds with thousand of
others under similar circumstances. When I first became interested in
physical education, I studied photographs and the measurements of all
professional strong men whose data I could secure. I noted the enormous
chest measurements given by some of these prominent strong men, many of them
reaching almost 60 inches around the chest when expanded. I envied those
whose normal chests measured anywhere from 47 to over 50 inches. I longed
to possess a chest like theirs.

I have worked faithfully for many years; yet I fall far short of these
measurements. Today my normal chest measurement is but 44 1/2 inches, and
my chest measurements, expanded, reaches 48 1/2 inches. Many times during my period of body building I became discouraged because my measurements were so slow in reaching the goal I had set for them.

I was also always anxious to obtain flexed biceps measuring 17 1/2 or 18
inches, but again I fell short of these proportions. Today my flexed upper
arms measures but 16 1/2 inches. If the reader should experience any
similar discouragement, let me console him with the fact that 90 percent of the
measurements given out by famous strong men are grossly exaggerated. I know
personally several athletes prominent in the physical culture world who
claim 49 inch normal chests and 17 inch upper arms, when, in reality, their chest
normal is many inches less and their upper arms are not as large as my own.

Only a few months ago a crowd of us were gathered in the private gym of a
well-known boxing trainer when this shy subject came up. The boxing
instructor, one of the finest developed men in his class, and one of
prominence as well, was telling us about of the famous athletes of a former
generation, when he happened to mention Matsada Sarakichi.

Some of middle-aged readers may recall this Sarakicki, a Japanese wrestler
of phenomenal development with the strength of an ox. The boxing master had a
framed photo of the athlete hanging on the wall, near his deak. Pointing to
the picture, he said, "How much would you boys say Matsada measured around
the chest?"

The Jap was a about 5 feet 11 inches in height and he looked as though he
weighed just about a pound less than a horse, so we guessed him - 50 to 54
inches.

"You're all wrong, said the old boxer. "He only measured 47 inches normal,
but when he folded those great arms of his over his chest and puffed himself
out, he looked as big as a whale."

And that's the answer. It isn't the size, so much as what the size looks
like when it's photographed. I shall have something very important to say
to you about this subject a little later on that may give you a lot of help in
presenting yourself to the public in a more pleasing and convincing form.
But I want to tell you something further about this question of
measurements.

First and foremost I can't find it in my heart to blame a student for
becoming discouraged if he does not obtain the proportions some men claim
that they have. I became discouraged myself, and I know just how other
conscientious men, who have been working hard on their physical development,
would naturally feel about the matter.

Don't Fool Yourself in Your Measuring

I do not know whether the measurements given out by some professional strong
men are magnified for the purpose of self-gratification, or whether they
measured themselves and actually fooled themselves in taking their
measurements.

If the latte should be the case, let me warn the student that when measuring
any part of his body, he must the most strict attention to the tape and see
that it does not sag in any part. For instance, if you are measuring your
chest, it is the simplest thing to fool yourself when passing the tape
around and under your armpits, and then taking a deep inhalation, to throw your
shoulders back and expand yourself and expand your chest as much as
possible. Of course you see the tape measure in front of you, but if could see the
tape behind your back, you might observe that it is displaced many inches
downward towards your waist.

Always measure yourself in front of a mirror, turning around so that you can
see your back as well as your front. If you have the tape fitting snugly,
with about two or three pounds pressure, you will obtain your actual
measurements. If these measurements fall short of the measurements you see
on paper concerning many strong men, do not be discouraged, for if you
possess a well-developed physique, you may be almost as large as these
strong men are themselves.

The same thing applies to feats of strength. I do not know at the present
writing how many claimants there are to the title "Strongest man in the
world," but there are more claimants to this title than there are feet in a
mile. As soon as an athlete obtains a little publicity and is able to lift
somewhere around 250 pounds, another "world's strongest man" is found, and
naturally more discouraged would-be strong men.

The Story of the Champion Lifter

It was only recently, at a weight-lifting tournament, that a well-known
lifter sent in his best lifts ahead of his appearance. I chanced to see his
letter and his phenomenal records actually scared me, for I had contemplated
entering the tournament myself, purely for the fun of it. However, I
diplomatically kept out of it as I really was afraid of this entrant. I was
asked to act as a judge in this contest, as long as I did not enter it.

I expected great things from this wonderful strong man. Therefore, you can
imagine my surprise when the best lift make at this open competition was
only 220 pounds! In all fairness to the competitors, I am sure they could have
done better, but the reader can imagine my consternation when a 220-pound
lift secured a championship gold belt, when I myself had many times lifted
in practice more than this. I simply mention his occurrence as it is a similar
case to what I have to say on measurements.

It is a sad thing for me to tell the reader not to believe all he hears
regarding feats of strength and measurements of prominent strong men. Do
not misunderstand me, and think that I am including all strong men in this
category. Such men as Arthur Saxon, George Hackenschmidt, Joe Nordquest,
and many others, did not exaggerate their feats of strength nor the size of
their measurements - they did not have to. There are hundreds of others, too,
whose records and measurements are absolutely reliable.

Let the student continue diligently with his training and endeavor to secure
as well-muscled proportions as possible. Even if he does not obtain
measurements any larger than my own, do not let him feel discouraged. Any
young man who is from 5 feet 8 inches to 5 feet 10 inches in height should
have no difficulty in obtaining at least a 16 inch upper arm and a 17 inch
neck, as well as a 46 or 47 inch expanded chest. If the student around 6
feet in height, he should have no difficulty in eventually obtaining a 17
1/2 inch neck, a 49 inch expanded chest and 16 1/2 inch upper arm.

If the student is but 5 feet 3 inches or 4 inches in height, he should have
no difficulty in obtaining a 16 inch neck, a 15 inch upper arm and a 44 inch
expanded chest. Of the three above-mentioned groups many obtain
measurements even beyond the ones I have outlined, for it is not impossible. But hey should not expect to reach the Herculean proportions of a Hackenschmidt.

How to Measure Your Muscles

When measuring your muscles, the tape should be passed around the largest
part. Let us begin with the neck. To obtain the proper measurement of the
neck, the head should be held erect, chin to the front and the tape passed
around the lower part of the neck, just above the point where the trapezius
muscle begins to slope towards the shoulder. Place about two pounds
pressure on the tape in taking these measurements.

If you bend the head back and throw out he muscles of the neck, the neck
will increase about one to two inches in size. However, you will not be
obtaining your actual neck measurements, but will be obtaining a measurement of your expanded neck. You should never consider the expanded back measurement, for in all measurement tables given of athletes, the normal neck measurement is
always taken for granted. If you consider your expanded back measurement
and develop your other muscles in proportion to this, your neck will never be
properly developed, for you are utilizing your expanded measurements in your
table of proportions.

In measuring the chest, the tape should always be passed under the armpits,
in a straight line around the chest, about one inch above the nipples. By
exhaling all the air from your lungs and relaxing your muscles, you obtain
your contracted chest measurement. Now adjust the tape again to the
previous position and stand perfectly normal, head erect, muscles relaxed and chest corresponding with your erect standing or walking posture. This will be
your normal chest girth.

By inhaling as much air as you possibly can, and at the same time expanding
your latissimus dorsi muscles and swelling your chest to its utmost, you
will obtain your expanded chest measurement. These measurements, of course, will not be measurements of your actual lung expansion, because they are assisted
by your muscles.

To obtain the actual measurement of your lung expansion, you should pass the
tape around your lower chest at the ninth rib, which is a few inches below
the nipples. The difference between your normal and expanded chest
measurements at this point will be very slight. In fact, if you expand
three or more inches, you have wonderful expansion. However, these lower chest
measurements are rarely utilized in any table of measurements of athletes.

How to Measure the Index of Strength

Your upper arm may rightly be regarded as your index of strength. If a chap
has any development worth talking about, it usually shows in the upper arm.

In measuring your upper arm, first pass the tape around the largest part of
your upper arm when the arm is straight and held relaxed horizontally.
Next, flex your arm by vigorously contracting the triceps and biceps, bring the
fist as near the shoulder as possible, and turning the palm of your hand
towards shoulder. By doing this, you will obtain the largest girth of your
flexed upper arm, providing, of course, you pass the tape around your
largest part.

In measuring your upper arm, in this case, do it before a mirror, so that
you can see both the back and front, and note whether the tape is passed
straight around the arm, or whether the tape is passed straight around the arm, or
whether it is on a slant. By having the tape slanting, you only fool
yourself. I am convinced that it is undoubtedly just such a slanting tape
that produces the magnified measurements of a great many professional strong
men.

The forearm should be measured also around the largest part with the arms
straight and fist clenched. To obtain the contracted forearm measurement,
bend your arm and pass the tape around the largest part as near the elbow as
possible.

The waist should be measured when standing in an erect posture, not drawing
in too much, neither should you allow your abdomen to protrude. By holding
the chest up in a military carriage, you will obtain your normal waist
measurement. The tape should be passed around the waist at about the height
of the navel.

In measuring the hips, pass the tape around the largest part and apply about
four pounds pressure, thus allowing for irregularities of this part of the
body.

The measurement of the thighs should be taken around the largest part of the
thigh, which in most cases is directly below the crotch. If your legs are
exceptionally developed, with pronounced curves to the extensor muscles,
perhaps your largest girth may be a little lower than this. However, this
can be taken in a complete state of contraction; that is, when you stiffen
the knee and tighten the muscles.

The calf should be measured around the largest part. By raising your toes
off the floor and simply standing on your heels, you will obtain a slightly
larger girth than if you stood flat footed, because you can get a slightly
greater expansion of the muscles in this position.

The measurement of the wrist and ankle should be taken around the smallest
girth.

You should, when you begin your development, take a complete set of these
measurements, keeping them carefully, so as to see what progress you are
making. In this way you'll be able to get a mental picture of yourself, at
any time, just the way you were before you commenced your training, and
surprise all your friends with the progress you are making.


Have a nice day

Marc



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Ciccio

This is easily one of your most interesting posts, Marc. Seriously!

Thanks for bringing it up.
Just the formating is a pain in the ass.

Franco
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NATUREBOY

Is a neck harness worth it?

It's only good for neck extension, right?
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marcrph

Portugal

Ciccio wrote:
This is easily one of your most interesting posts, Marc. Seriously!

Thanks for bringing it up.
Just the formating is a pain in the ass.

Franco


Franco

I'm very sorry for the formatting!
I hope you can forgive my ineptness with the computer. I'm a johnny-come-lately on the computer scene.
The old-timers are interesting to me because they have none of the modern-day hang-ups that are so prevelant in the weight lifting scene today.

Have a nice day

Marc
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davise

I use a neck harness to do flexion and extension on my wifes bowflex machine.....lately I'm getting worried as I've been getting headaches after doing them. I do between 12-20 reps at a 3/3 cadence. Am I doing something wrong...should I be worried?
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josh_pitts

Ontario, CAN

Dr. Darden,

i am a football player and have recently moved away from high volume training. i have been using your "basic high intensity training program" for about a month and am having great results. how could i incorporate neck training into your basic high intensity routine?
i'd also like to know what kind of routine you'd recommend for a football player?
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Ellington Darden

josh,

Intermediate HIT Routine 3, on page 135 of The New HIT, is an example of how to add neck exercise to your routine. There is no one specific routine for football. Most in the book will work well.

Ellington
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BRUCELEEWANNABE

Florida, USA

I put this up over @ T-Mag. Thought everyone would like to see it here as well.

It looks well built. Forget the sight where I found it. If interested, let me know & I'll find it again in my favs. folder.
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NewYorker

New York, USA

BRUCELEEWANNABE wrote:
I put this up over @ T-Mag. Thought everyone would like to see it here as well.

It looks well built. Forget the sight where I found it. If interested, let me know & I'll find it again in my favs. folder.


When I don't have access to a neck machine, I find a bungee chord (aka resistance bands) and a head harness effective. I a little ... well... skeptical about the device shown.

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BRUCELEEWANNABE

Florida, USA

NewYorker wrote:
BRUCELEEWANNABE wrote:
I put this up over @ T-Mag. Thought everyone would like to see it here as well.

It looks well built. Forget the sight where I found it. If interested, let me know & I'll find it again in my favs. folder.

When I don't have access to a neck machine, I find a bungee chord (aka resistance bands) and a head harness effective. I a little ... well... skeptical about the device shown.



Well, it's pretty much the same thing E. Darden made to build up his neck. And he had a big strong neck from it's use. So, don't feel skeptical.

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josh_pitts

Ontario, CAN

Dr. Darden,

you say in "The New Hit" that Arthur Jones would train Dick Butkus. What kind of a routine would he have Butkus do? I'm curious because I'm a young football player and a huge Butkus fan. Should I be doing a similar routine?

Josh
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Ellington Darden

Josh,

Jones had Butkus do 4 exericses for his lower body and 6 exercises for his upper body. One set of 8-12 reps, twice a week.

Ellington
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paulmanubay

New Hampshire, USA

Dr. Darden,
I have a few questions concerning the old Nautilus Rotary Neck machine. Years back, I believe I read an article that spoke out against training your neck in the same motion/movement that the rotary neck machine uses. The article claimed that improper performance of this particular movement(not the machine itself) caused serious injuries.

Dr. Darden,my questions are: Are you aware of any such claims? how should I incorporate the rotary neck machine into my routine?
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Ellington Darden

paulmanubay wrote:
Dr. Darden,
I have a few questions concerning the old Nautilus Rotary Neck machine. Years back, I believe I read an article that spoke out against training your neck in the same motion/movement that the rotary neck machine uses. The article claimed that improper performance of this particular movement(not the machine itself) caused serious injuries.

Dr. Darden,my questions are: Are you aware of any such claims? how should I incorporate the rotary neck machine into my routine?


I'm not aware of any problems related to what you mentioned. The Rotary Neck was applied after the 4-Way Neck.

Ellington

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Featster




Hey all;

Just started recently on neck work, and fortunately my gym has one of the old first generation Nautilus 4-way neck machines. Unfortunately, I don't know how to set it up correctly (what body part lines up with the axis of the cam) and repeated searches throughout bookstores and online have yielded no copies of an old instruction manual. Can anybody help me out here?
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Ellington Darden

Featster wrote:



Hey all;

Just started recently on neck work, and fortunately my gym has one of the old first generation Nautilus 4-way neck machines. Unfortunately, I don't know how to set it up correctly (what body part lines up with the axis of the cam) and repeated searches throughout bookstores and online have yielded no copies of an old instruction manual. Can anybody help me out here?


Line your Adam's Apple up with the axis of the cam on all four positions. That's the best guideline to apply initially.

Ellington

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Featster

Doc;

Thanks so much for the tip......on a related note, my gym used to have several pieces of first generation Nautilus machines....(duo leg press/leg ext, duo pullover/pulldown, tricep and bicep machines, fly/decline press, super pullover)....a few years ago the owner decided to become part of the Gold's Gym system. He got rid of all the old Nautilus machines with the exception of the four-way neck, darn it. They were replaced with some Hammer pieces and Cybex and Flex machines......the owner claimed that Gold's "forced" him to update the equuipment.

Whatever.....I sure miss those old blue Nautilus pieces. The Hammer equipment is nice, but it doesn't seem as effective as Nautilus......I've been experimenting with different seat settings and grips on the Hammer flat & incline bench presses but just can't seem to feel it in my pecs like I should. The Flex & Cybex pieces are expensive junk, I think. But I could be wrong.....

Thanks again for tip, Doc.

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jacao

BRUCELEEWANNABE wrote:
I put this up over @ T-Mag. Thought everyone would like to see it here as well.

It looks well built. Forget the sight where I found it. If interested, let me know & I'll find it again in my favs. folder.


Hi. Im new in this forum. I'm interested in getting this spartacus, would you kindly help me on how or where to get it?Thanks.
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Acerimmer1

Dr Darden

I have a larger right SCM coastal though the clavicular attachment of the left SCM is larger and I also have tight scalene both sides.

Should I embark on any form of neck training routine as a countermeasure in conjunction with stretching or would this backfire?

I ask also because my left lower trap is weaker than the right and have concluded that the SCM is trapping the nerve supply at the neck since I can only contract it fully by shortening the left coracoastal SCM.

Advice would be appreciated. Thanks
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Ellington Darden

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Dr Darden

I have a larger right SCM coastal though the clavicular attachment of the left SCM is larger and I also have tight scalene both sides.

Should I embark on any form of neck training routine as a countermeasure in conjunction with stretching or would this backfire?

I ask also because my left lower trap is weaker than the right and have concluded that the SCM is trapping the nerve supply at the neck since I can only contract it fully by shortening the left coracoastal SCM.

Advice would be appreciated. Thanks


I've never dealt with the problem you described. You should seek the advice of a physician who specializes in sports medicine.

Ellington

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Saybrook

Dr. Darden,

Thank you for your informative article on neck exercise. I just started using a Hammer 4-way neck machine at our local rec center. I have noticed that I am much stronger moving my head back against the weight than I am in the forward movement (forehead against the resistance pad). I also seem to progress faster (more weight in good form) in moving the head back against resistance. Is this normal? More important, should I hold back on progression in the back movement so as to prevent a muscular imbalance? In the side movements, my strength seems equal on both sides.

As always, you thoughts and advice greatly appreciated.

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