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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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How Big Is Your Neck?
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Ellington Darden

Saybrook wrote:
Dr. Darden,

Thank you for your informative article on neck exercise. I just started using a Hammer 4-way neck machine at our local rec center. I have noticed that I am much stronger moving my head back against the weight than I am in the forward movement (forehead against the resistance pad). I also seem to progress faster (more weight in good form) in moving the head back against resistance. Is this normal? More important, should I hold back on progression in the back movement so as to prevent a muscular imbalance? In the side movements, my strength seems equal on both sides.

As always, you thoughts and advice greatly appreciated.



Sometimes the resistance is the same in all four directions. But usually they are not. It's normal to be stronger in the back extension movement. I would not hold back on it. Continue to add resistance when you can and pay attention to your form.

Ellington

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paxdill

Dr. Darden,

I've followed some of the exercises posted for the neck. I've always had a long skinny neck, but after a few weeks, I've increased my side neckmuscles to 14 inches.

It looks OK from front to back. But is still very thin looking in profile. Which excerises increase the front and back muscles when viewed in profile? I appreciate the help.

AD-
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Ellington Darden

AD,

You need to do the exercises for front flexion and back extension. Those two should help round out your neck.

Ellington
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paxdill

Thank you,

These excercises are so easy to do and they work. Not being an athlete I never even knew how to increase the neck before.

I've learned ALOT from this website. Its great.

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zim

Dr. Darden,

As a former Nautilus personal trainer and co-worker of Gary Jones(when he was a firefighter), I've always understood the value of proper neck exercise. At age 58, I was told by my GP that I had a bit of arthritis in my neck. I immediately called Dr. Michael Fulton at Greenacres and made an appointment to discuss my x-rays and some course of rehab.
It turned out that my neck training (when I had access to a neck machine) enabled me to maintain a surprising amount of strength for my age bracket.

Dr. Fulton suggested that I find 4-way machine and utilize it twice a month or so, to gain even more strength and to possibly offset any future problems with arthritis.
My question to you is about frequency.
I found a Hammer 4 way at an auction and have it in my home gym. I am thinking of one intense neck workout every other week, with a light to moderate workout during the " off week".

Can you enlighten me on a frequency that will increase neck strength but not overtrain?
BTW...it is very disappointing that very, very few gyms have a neck machine. What a shame!
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Ellington Darden

zim,

I'm glad you appreciate the importance of a strong neck, especially at your age.

I'd recommend working the front and back once a week. The sides I'd do very infrequently, perhaps once a month.

The above plan has worked very well for me.

Ellington
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

BRUCELEEWANNABE wrote:
I put this up over @ T-Mag. Thought everyone would like to see it here as well.

It looks well built. Forget the sight where I found it. If interested, let me know & I'll find it again in my favs. folder.


The site is PDA. However the owner of the company passed away suddenly last year and the helmets are no longer being made.
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

FYI , the plate loaded Hammer 4 way neck can be used in a negative only manner very easily. You can just use your hands to bring the movement arm into the " finish " position and lower it with your neck only.
Just be careful with the transition from hand to neck.
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ganyuehan

Can neck bridges make the back of your neck bigger? And should you do them in repetitions or just hold it in the contracted position?
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Ellington Darden

Neck bridges are dangerous, unless you have a knowledgeable instructor who coaches you in all the finer points. They should be performed in repetitions of various head movements, both forward and backward.

Ellington
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ganyuehan

Thank you Dr. Darden. Should a pencil neck working out at home with no instructor do another exercise?
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Ellington Darden

Guys,

I just received a note from Fred Fornicola, who sent me this photo of Joel Waldman. Joel was big into Nautilus in the 1970s through the 1990s and entered various physique contests. Attached is shot of Joel from 1994, after be won a Best-Neck contest. At that time, Joel was 46 years of age, weighed 265 pounds, and supported a 21-inch neck, which he could pump to a full 22 inches. Perhaps Joel will fill us in some more details?

Ellington
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
Guys,

I just received a note from Fred Fornicola, who sent me this photo of Joel Waldman. Joel was big into Nautilus in the 1970s through the 1990s and entered various physique contests. Attached is shot of Joel from 1994, after be won a Best-Neck contest. At that time, Joel was 46 years of age, weighed 265 pounds, and supported a 21-inch neck, which he could pump to a full 22 inches. Perhaps Joel will fill us in some more details?

Ellington


That is by far the biggest muscular neck I have ever seen.
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JimBryan

Florida, USA

Joel is a stand up guy. First SS Convention I went to, I saw Joel and said to myself, "Now this guy has some muscle!" I was in the Restaurant waiting for the Convention to start and was looking around for guys that looked like they lifted. Didn't see many but Joel stood out and many others in the dining room noticed him too. Strong as a Bull, I hear.
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trapsrule215

Good Morning!(5am)

Thanks Dr. Darden for posting me on your website...it is good for the ego of a gently aging iron game devotee.

If anyone is interested in how I trained my neck in those years, it is quite simple...mostly manual resistance negatives provided by a very good and very strong training partner. We trained neck once per week and would do 6 to 10
10second negative only all out reps on six exercises...posterior extension, anterior flexion, lateral flexion both right and left and cervical rotation in both directions.

My neck would pump at least an inch to an inch and a half in the 8 minutes it took to perform those exercises. In addition, I always performed an exercise we called top deadlift/negative shrug in a power rack...bar starting mid thigh in a partial squatty pre-shrugged position and dragged to the highest position possible and then resisted on the way down to a fully stretched unshrugged position.

This was performed for one set of about 10 reps 2 to 4 times per month...always trying to work up to over 1000lbs.

Nothing fancy here, just heavy weights, reasonably good form, and killer intensity.

Any questions, PM me.
Take care everybody....Joel Waldman
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Ellington Darden

Joel,

Thanks for sharing your story with us.

Surely, you must have experimented some with the three Nautilus neck machines: the 4-way, rotary, and shoulder shrug?

Ellington
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trapsrule215

Ellington Darden wrote:
Joel,

Thanks for sharing your story with us.

Surely, you must have experimented some with the three Nautilus neck machines: the 4-way, rotary, and shoulder shrug?

Ellington


Ellington...

At the time, I didn't have access to the rotary neck machine...I surely would have used it. I did have the 4 way neck and the neck and shoulder machines...both had insufficient resistance for negative only training at that time and one of the inherent problems with the neck and shoulder machine was the painful pressure my forearms experienced from the pads when going really heavy...

I loved both machines as did my members but for me at that time, I found manuals and barbell shrugs more suitable. BTW, I now have a vintage infimetric rotary neck and always include it in my neck training...it's awesome!!! Joel

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