MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

What is muscular (momentary or otherwise)failure anyway?

I mean I push each set to its limit as long as its safe but all sets are not created equal.

That is, you usually fail where your leverage is weakest during a set. Failing in the point of stretch as opposed to near full contraction are not the same animal. Failing from muscle burn, pain, distraction/loss of focus and just plain running out of steam/energy are all "different" forms of M.M.F.

How about faster fatiguing muscles failing before others in multi joint exercises (smaller or STF vs. FTF)?

How about failing because you have done previous sets for the same muscle? Is failing during a longer heavy set because you and the given muscle fresh the same as failing during the same exercise farther into a workout (and possibly with less load/and or quicker?

What about combinations of those elements? That is, varying degrees of each coming together in different amounts all causing failure ? are they all comparable?

Does any of this even matter? Well it depends on how high a priority you place on training to M.M.F.

Thoughts?

Regards,
Andrew
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NATUREBOY

To me, training to failure is:

Continuing each set until you can't budge the weight, no matter how hard you try or how much you cheat. If Jennifer Simpson or Angelina Jolie promised to "do you" for budging the weight just a centimeter, you should NOT be able to do it.

One should at least train to static failure (positive + forced reps); ideally - negative failure. It's only one set - go hard. Even if you only do one HIT workout per week, so what? As long as you are progressing, you are doing fine. If you find yourself decompensating during the layoff, add a NTF workout or two in between the to-failure sessions.

I do not believe the other points you brought up are relevant.
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frostyF

Arkansas, USA

Who is Jennifer Simpson?
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cmg

To me failure is positive failure when you can no longer move the weigth in the positive direction (static). Most exercises are not possible to go to neg. failure without a partner (dips/chins exceptions). If going to neg failure I feel the workouts have to be cut too short or complete burnout will happen within 1-2 weeks.

Regards,

Ron
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

frostyF wrote:
Who is Jennifer Simpson?


Jessica Simpson's even hotter sister. You never hear about her because her only talent is stopping traffic when she dons her bikini top and cutoffs.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

The point though is; most think of training to M.M.F. as a fairly specific thing, when really it isn't that specific at all. What portion of your muscles possible ROM it fails during can be equipment based not muscular. Thus, you results (which are dependant on this) can vary based on exercise choice, rep performance and exercise order etc.

I think that if you use training to failure all the time, you might want to consider this at length.

Regards,
Andrew
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RUGGED_INTELLECT

I'm sure I don't see what's important about what part of the ROM you fail at. How will it make any difference if I fail at full contraction, and inch from full contraction, or can't even get the next rep started from full stretch? How will this affect my growth and progression? If I train hard and consistently, with good form and look to progress wherever and whenever I can, is that not enough? I typically never fail in the same spot twice, like from one workout with a certain weight I failed in the lower quarter of the rep, then the next workout with the same weight I get to the same rep but fail in the top quarter, then the following workout I achieve that rep, and hence up my weight. Maybe I should be failing at multiple parts of the ROM in each workout, maybe I should go JReps for a mind blowing pump!
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

MMF is when you can't complete a rep with good form. I know this is a problem to many because they are unaware of what good form is.

But even for those people there will be a point where they can not complete a rep in what they define as good form. I have no problem with Dr. Darden's definition, do you?
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yari

South Africa

i agree with rtestes but have 1 problem: i train alone at home and have no spotter so how can i achieve MMF without dropping a weight on my head when benching. i push till the last rep is virtually impossible and then drop the weigth 5% to push out some more but actually achieving MMF is dangerous in that case. any ideas?
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chaire

North Carolina, USA

I train negative only. I have reached failure when I can not control the downward movement, 2 to 3 seconds. Reps are counted only if they are 8 to 10 seconds in length.
God Bless,
Charlie
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RUGGED_INTELLECT

yari wrote:
i agree with rtestes but have 1 problem: i train alone at home and have no spotter so how can i achieve MMF without dropping a weight on my head when benching. i push till the last rep is virtually impossible and then drop the weigth 5% to push out some more but actually achieving MMF is dangerous in that case. any ideas?


Just stay safe Yari. Failure is not all important, progression is, so as long as you're going up in reps and/or weight, just go to failure on the moves you aren't going to compromise yourself on. Squats are obviously a problem unless you have a good power rack and also bench presses, but besides that(add any I've missed) you're usually in a position after positive failure to lower the weight under control. With the benches and squats, if you've been lifting a while you know when you've gotten that last rep and if you attempt the next you won't get it. Always err on the side of getting a rep or two short here and stay safe.
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NATUREBOY

yari wrote:
i agree with rtestes but have 1 problem: i train alone at home and have no spotter so how can i achieve MMF without dropping a weight on my head when benching. i push till the last rep is virtually impossible and then drop the weigth 5% to push out some more but actually achieving MMF is dangerous in that case. any ideas?


Yari,

If you don't have a power rack, you should use dumbbells for all the pressing movements and substitute deadlifts for squats. This will keep you safe while still allowing you to work to failure.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

If you examine the issue closely, you should be aware of 2 things:

1. M.M.F. will be equipment and person specific which means there is a wide variance as to possible stimulation and response - that is, for you muscle to muscle exercise to exercise AND person to person.

2. Because of this variance, always training full out may hurt gains if you do not understand how to balance and re-balance the other variables.

Now I will try to get a bit more specific.

We know that gains can come "without" training to M.M.F or training that way the majority of the time. If training with very high effort/intensity is integral to muscle growth, does this mean lowering effort lowers gains?

If not why?

I hope you see what I am getting at here now. It is clear to me that training with as high effort "as possible" provides the best gains - the key is "as is possible", which includes not losing volume, frequency, specificity etc. Making it possible whether adding NTF sessions or what have you, is of paramount importance.

Regards,
Andrew
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