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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
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This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

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Rib Cage
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Back atleast a month ago I was looking at a post that showed Dr. Dardens rib cage back in the 70's. It looked amazing and he was explaining how he trained it. A combination of squats and pullovers I believe.
Anyways I can't find that post after searching for a good while. Can somebody please direct me to the post if they know where it is.
Thanks

Michael
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henry_bordeaux

Classic Rib-Cage Development:

by Ellington Darden, Ph.D.

An Ignored Routine to Expand Your Chest
When I was involved in competitive bodybuilding from 1968-1972, I perfected a series of four poses that featured my chest. This series progressed as follows:


1. Started with a basic chest pose from the left side.
2. Raised my rib cage by inhaling deeply.
3. Turned right 180 degrees and duplicated the second pose from the opposite side.
4. Eased into a stomach vacuum while pulling the ribs up with my hands and wrists to create an arch in the mid back, which forced my rib cage out even more.
The four poses were separated by extending my arms to the front of the body and then drawing my hands slowly into the midsection. Properly performed, it appeared as through my chest was expanding an extra 2 to 3 inches with each new phase. The last two poses always brought positive reactions from the judges and the audience, which allowed me to win a number of "best chest" awards during my career. Read on to discover the simple routine that I used for triggering my rib-cage expansion.


You almost never see the rib-cage development on bodybuilders today that you did on the bodybuilders of 50 years ago. Most of the current champions tend to concentrate more on their pectoral muscles and less on their rib cage. It?s a shame, too, because enlarging the rib cage can do more to deepen the chest than thickening the pectorals can ever do.
When I began weight training consistently in 1959, one of the established principles was to do a set of pullovers after a set of squats. I practiced this guideline during my weekly workouts for many years with great success. By 1968, I had built a rib cage that actually exceeded my goal.
As a sophomore in high school (1960) in Conroe, Texas, I can remember being influenced by pictures of the thick rib-cage development of such men as George Eiferman, Abe Goldberg, Reg Park, and Millard Williamson. I recall in particular a picture of Williamson with a glass of water resting vertically atop of his expanded chest. Boy, was I impressed.
Several years later, I was awed by Mike Ferraro, who won the 1964 Mr. USA contest with rib-cage, chest, and torso development that has seldom been seen since then. Ferraro?s favorite exercise was the dumbbell pullover.
One secret to these classic bodybuilders? rib-cage expansion was not only combining squats and pullovers, but the specific way that you were recommended to breathe during the exercises. Let?s examine each movement.

BREATHING SQUATS
Place a barbell on a squat rack and load it with a moderately heavy weight. Position the bar behind your neck across your trapezius muscles and hold the bar in place with your hands. Straighten your legs to lift the bar off the rack and move back one step. Place your feet shoulder-width apart, toes angled slightly outward.
Take a deep breath and lower your body until your hamstrings firmly come in contact with your calves. Return smoothly to the top position and exhale. Take another deep breath and continue for 8 repetitions. It?s important that you inhale and exhale only once per repetition.
Don?t stop just yet, however. Keep the barbell on your back. You must progress to the next phase.
Beginning with the 9th repetition, take two deep breaths between repetitions rather than only one. Continue for another 7 repetitions, if possible ? or 15 repetitions in total. (Note: The bodybuilders of the 1950s and 60s recommended that you perform higher repetitions, usually from 11-20, on squats and pullovers.)
As soon as you finish your final repetition, immediately do breathing pullovers.

BREATHING PULLOVERS
Pullovers are a terrific rib-cage exercise, especially if you do them after squats. Again, you?ll be emphasizing the same breathing pattern.
Lie crossways on a low bench. Hold a dumbbell on one end with your palms on the inside handle area of the weight plates. Extend your head slightly off the bench, with the dumbbell over your chest and your elbows straight.
Take a deep breath and lower the dumbbell behind your head and try to touch the floor. Keep your arms as straight as possible. As the dumbbell approaches the floor, drop your buttocks while keeping your feet together and legs relatively straight. You?ll have a nice arch in your middle and lower back and you?ll feel an unusual pull throughout your torso in this bottom stretch. Lift the dumbbell slowly back to the over-chest position.
Practice one deep breath during each of the first 8 repetitions, and two deep breaths ? and hold the second one ? during repetitions 9-15.

WIDE, THICK, and DEEP
It will require several learning sessions using moderate resistance to get the hang of breathing squats and breathing pullovers. But within two weeks, you should be able to progress to heavier and heavier weights in both.
Note: You may substitute the leg press machine for the squat. Also, in place of the squat, some trainees experience good results using trap-bar deadlifts or regular deadlifts. Just be sure and perform the breathing in the same style.
For an intermediate bodybuilder, you goal is to accomplish the breathing squat with 225 pounds and the breathing pullover with 45 pounds. Keep working hard and always try to increase the resistance ? while adhering to strict form.
When you can do the breathing squats with 315 pounds and the breathing pullovers with 65 pounds ? both for 15 repetitions ? you?ll have a torso and a rib cage that will be wide, thick, and deep. And you?ll be well along the road to building a classic rib cage.

Other Exercises for Expanding the Rib Cage

Muscle, tendon, cartilage, and other connective tissues are more easily stretched and expanded during the developmental years. Thus, a teenager can more readily enlarge his rib cage than can an adult. This is not to say that rib-cage expansion can?t be done after maturity. It just takes more concentrated work. Here are four other exercises that can help you in your quest for a bigger rib cage. Either of the first two may be substituted for the breathing pullover. The last two are auxiliary movements. Practice them when your workout is completed.

Lat Machine Pullover While Standing

Attach a straight bar on a high lat machine. Grasp the bar with your hands close together and your palms down. Turn and face away from the bar. Your hands should be behind your head. Keep your arms relatively straight and lean away from the machine. With the chest expanded, the torso stretched, and the body on a 45-degree angle to the floor, you are now in the starting position.Pull the bar over your head and in front of your chest. Keep your elbows locked throughout. Let the bar smoothly return behind your head to the starting position. Stretch for a few seconds by leaning into the bar. Repeat for the required repetitions.

Nautilus Pullover Machine

Here?s a terrific exercise that requires the Nautilus pullover machine, which used to be a basic piece of equipment in most fitness centers. Because of machine?s rotary resistance, you have a much greater range of motion than is possible with a dumbbell pullover. If you?re lucky enough to have access to one, be sure and apply it.Sit in the machine. Make sure the top of your shoulder lines up with the axis of the movement arm. Adjust the seat bottom appropriately until it does. Fasten the seat belt across your hips. Leg press the footpedal until the pads on the movement arm are about chin level. Place your elbows on the pads and you?re ready to begin.Remove your feet from the foot pedal and slowly rotate your elbows back into a comfortable shoulder and upper-back stretch. Pause for a few seconds and stretch even more. Rotate your elbows forward and downward smoothly until the bar touches your midsection. Return slowly to the stretched position. Repeat for the required repetitions.

Backbend on Floor

This exercise will help to stretch the torso and to contract the muscles of the lower and middle back. It will also assist you in projecting your rib cage during a side chest pose. Important: Attempt this movement very cautiously at first ? and if you experience any unusual pain, discontinue it immediately.Lie face down on the floor. Look toward the ceiling and begin to arch your neck and middle back. With your hands in a push-up position under your shoulders, gradually straighten your elbows as you extend and arch your middle and lower back more and more. When you reach the highest-possible position, bend your knees and try to touch your feet to your head. At the same time, push your head back further by extending your arms. Ease out of the top position and return smoothly to the floor. Repeat several times. Few people initially will be able to touch their feet to their head, but many can work up to it in several months.

Stomach Vacuum

Here?s a movement that will help you control your breathing, as well as some of the smaller muscles that surround your rig cage. It was a favorite of Frank Zane, a former Mr. Olympia. And it contributed greatly to my ability to project my rib cage during my chest poses.Lie on your back on the floor. Make sure your stomach is relatively empty. Place your hands across the bottom of your rib cage and the top of your abdominals. Take a normal breath and forcibly blow out as much air as possible. This should require about 10 seconds. Now here?s the challenging part: Suck in your stomach to the maximum degree ? while not taking in any air during the process. If you?re doing it properly, you?ll feel a concave formation ? which is called a stomach vacuum ? under your lower ribs.You won?t be able to hold the vacuum very long. Try it several times while lying down. If you feel a little light-headed, that?s normal. Rest a little longer between repetitions.Stand now and try the vacuum in front of a mirror. Remove your shirt so you can see what?s happening. At first, the vacuum is more difficult to do standing than lying, but with a little practice you should be able to master it in a standing position. Then, you?ll want to apply it while contracting your arms and chest, as well as other muscle groups. That?s not easy to do initially, so you?ll have to practice it repeated for several months. But it?ll be worth it when you?re able to expand your rib cage and chest and ease into a stomach vacuum ? while walking on the beach this spring and summer.
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Thank you very much
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markandspike

Sounds like one of the new chapters in Ellington's new book.
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marcrph

Portugal

henry_bordeaux wrote:
Classic Rib-Cage Development:

by Ellington Darden, Ph.D.

Other Exercises for Expanding the Rib Cage

Backbend on Floor

This exercise will help to stretch the torso and to contract the muscles of the lower and middle back. It will also assist you in projecting your rib cage during a side chest pose. Important: Attempt this movement very cautiously at first ? and if you experience any unusual pain, discontinue it immediately.Lie face down on the floor. Look toward the ceiling and begin to arch your neck and middle back. With your hands in a push-up position under your shoulders, gradually straighten your elbows as you extend and arch your middle and lower back more and more. When you reach the highest-possible position, bend your knees and try to touch your feet to your head. At the same time, push your head back further by extending your arms. Ease out of the top position and return smoothly to the floor. Repeat several times. Few people initially will be able to touch their feet to their head, but many can work up to it in several months.

This exercise remembles a commonly prescribed exercise called the "Superman," that is, to extend the arms and legs simultaneously. This results in large compression forces to a hyperextended spine. Thus, one may construe this as a poorly designed exercise, especially for a trainee predisposed to low-back injury.
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waynegr

Switzerland

I used heavy DB pullovers at very young age, and it worked so well with me, I think it can work at any age, but best young.

Wayne
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Kathy Rodriguez

California, USA

waynegr wrote:
I used heavy DB pullovers at very young age, and it worked so well with me, I think it can work at any age, but best young.

Wayne


Can you post some measurements, Wayne?

Or a photo - you seem to be a very advanced trainee. I would love to see what all these years of training have produced.

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waynegr

Switzerland

12th August, Tiroler Landestheater, 7 pm, Introductory talk: 6 pm,
Prager Fassung, 1787, 2007.

I will be there, would you like to come.
Wayne
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Tom Traynor

Kathy Rodriguez wrote:
waynegr wrote:
I used heavy DB pullovers at very young age, and it worked so well with me, I think it can work at any age, but best young.

Wayne


Can you post some measurements, Wayne?

Or a photo - you seem to be a very advanced trainee. I would love to see what all these years of training have produced.

Kathy--you cannot trick Wayne that easily. After all, he is the ONLY ONE on the internet who caught onto Dr. Ken's faked squat..and overhead press, curl, etc. taped workout routine.

By the way--thanks Doc! ;)



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kurtvf

This is a very intresting topic. It used to be controversial as to if you could actually enlarge your rib cage with exercise. Anybody know the mechanism?? People with long term COPD certainly can develop a "barrel chest" that can be detected on x-ray and physical examination.

This is from chronically hyperinflated lungs and probably results from the ribs staying in the "inhalation position" (the ribs actually rotate upwards and outward during each breath to increase the thoracic volume-known as the "bucket handle phenominum(spelling?)) How does the ribcage grow from exercise????
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Ciccio

kurtvf wrote:
This is a very intresting topic. It used to be controversial as to if you could actually enlarge your rib cage with exercise. Anybody know the mechanism?? People with long term COPD certainly can develop a "barrel chest" that can be detected on x-ray and physical examination.

This is from chronically hyperinflated lungs and probably results from the ribs staying in the "inhalation position" (the ribs actually rotate upwards and outward during each breath to increase the thoracic volume-known as the "bucket handle phenominum(spelling?)) How does the ribcage grow from exercise????


I think it works exactly like you just wrote it. The immediate effect comes from this staying in the elevated position which will become somewhat permanent after doing the exercises for long periods of time.
I know that I did increase my rib cage from 20rep.breathing squats+pullovers.
And I was 31 those times.

Franco



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Kathy Rodriguez

California, USA

waynegr wrote:
12th August, Tiroler Landestheater, 7 pm, Introductory talk: 6 pm,
Prager Fassung, 1787, 2007.

I will be there, would you like to come.
Wayne


Tom Traynor, thanks for the info. I have not been here for some time but I do occasionally read some posts when I have time. I saw Wayne's reply and had to ask for a photo because anyone who is as advanced as he claims to be would be proud to show their physique.

Since my post I have received several PMs warning me that Wayne is a troll. Thanks to everyone who sent a PM.

I didn't understand Wayne's reply but thankfully one PM pointed out that the info was a concert that took place a year ago. Some kind of twisted humor, huh?

Interestingly, another PM gave me lots of details about Wayne: his real name, where he lives, and his mental illness. I won't repeat those details here, but thanks to that poster - your bro will have to visit Wayne if he gets out of hand!

Anyway, thanks for putting me in the picture guys.




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Tom Traynor

Kathy Rodriguez wrote:
waynegr wrote:
12th August, Tiroler Landestheater, 7 pm, Introductory talk: 6 pm,
Prager Fassung, 1787, 2007.

I will be there, would you like to come.
Wayne

Tom Traynor, thanks for the info. I have not been here for some time but I do occasionally read some posts when I have time. I saw Wayne's reply and had to ask for a photo because anyone who is as advanced as he claims to be would be proud to show their physique.

Since my post I have received several PMs warning me that Wayne is a troll. Thanks to everyone who sent a PM.

I didn't understand Wayne's reply but thankfully one PM pointed out that the info was a concert that took place a year ago. Some kind of twisted humor, huh?

Interestingly, another PM gave me lots of details about Wayne: his real name, where he lives, and his mental illness. I won't repeat those details here, but thanks to that poster - your bro will have to visit Wayne if he gets out of hand!

Anyway, thanks for putting me in the picture guys.






Well, to my discredit, I should consider that sometimes a person is just..."unique" (I KNOW I am--which is the first step :)). The internet isn't life and death. I thought: sometimes it is AMAZING how torqued up we get over discussions on strength training. That is until I started researching for a subwoofer for home stereo ("stereo" see how out of touch I am?). Same fire and brimstone "discussions" over best subwoofer....

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DrFist

Can someone post pictures of the rib-cage?
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kata14

DrFist wrote:
Can someone post pictures of the rib-cage?


This is a rib cage...
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DrFist

Thanks, but I meant a picture from the article the thread starter is referring to.

I know what a rib-cage is, mine was pounding after the leg workout!
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henry_bordeaux

DrFist wrote:
Thanks, but I meant a picture from the article the thread starter is referring to.

I know what a rib-cage is, mine was pounding after the leg workout!


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kurtvf

DrFist wrote:
Thanks, but I meant a picture from the article the thread starter is referring to.

I know what a rib-cage is, mine was pounding after the leg workout!


I also thought you wanted a picture of a non-specific rib cage.

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