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60-20-20
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elecjet

New York, USA

dr darden for some reason i never noticed this but most of your meals are this ratio. Should every meal be the ratio or could you sometimes just try to hit by the end of the day. Some meals i get more protien then carbs out of convience factors. Just wondering your thoughts

thank you
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Ellington Darden

elecjet wrote:
dr darden for some reason i never noticed this but most of your meals are this ratio. Should every meal be the ratio or could you sometimes just try to hit by the end of the day. Some meals i get more protien then carbs out of convience factors. Just wondering your thoughts

thank you


I have two houe cats who are 12 years old. They have never eaten anything but IAMS Cat Food, which comes in dry pellets in 4-pound bags. The breakdown of these pellets is proteins 28%, fats 29%, and carbohydrate 43% -- which is ideal for mature cats. Both cats are healthy and seem to thrive on the dry food.

I've often thought, wouldn't it be neat, if you could come up with some similar pellets for humans? It would certainly save most people a tremendous amount of time: limited food shopping, no cooking, simple eating arrangements, no costly kitchen utensils and appliances.

But I'll tell you this, my wife doesn't even like me to mention such concepts -- because she, and many people, disagree with such thinking. Food shopping and preparation, eating, and everything that goes with it, to them, is much more than just "eating."

But to get back to your question, yes, I believe that a 60/20/20 eating composition -- if you could stick with it for every meal -- would be ideal. Of course, that's not possible, in our society. But you can try.

And, yes, if you're off a little, or a lot, here and there -- you can compensate a little or a lot at the next meal. What happens as a result of 2-3 days of eating is probably more important that what happens at one meal.

Ah, but I still think about those pellets. If I could only change myself into a cat?

Ellington

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Cherry

The Polymeal is a partial meal replacement strategy to make it convenient to add some healthful ingrediants to your diet.

http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/...bmedid=15604180

We searched PubMed, informed by expert advice, for nonpharmacological ingredients with evidence levels 1 or 2: randomised controlled trials, meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials, and meta-analyses of observational studies.5 To be included in the Polymeal, the ingredient had to have individually reported effects (not as an element of a diet) on reduction in cardiovascular disease events or modification of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We checked papers retrieved for further possible ingredients. The following dietary elements met the inclusion criteria to be ingredients of the Polymeal: wine, fish, dark chocolate, fruits and vegetables, almonds, and garlic (Allium sativum).

We obtained information from the literature on the benefits of the interventions (table 1). Daily consumption of 150 ml of wine reduces cardiovascular disease by 32% (95% confidence interval 33% to 41%).6 Fish (114 g) consumed four times a week reduces cardiovascular disease by 14% (8% to 19%).7 For chocolate, fruits and vegetables, almonds, and garlic, we found data on modification of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. One hundred grams of dark chocolate consumed daily reduces systolic blood pressure by 5.1 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 1.8 mm Hg8; similar reductions in blood pressure correspond to a reduction in cardiovascular disease events of 21% (14% to 27%).9 A total of 400 g of fruit and vegetables consumed daily produced a reduction in blood pressure similar to that observed with chocolate (4.0 mm Hg systolic blood pressure and 1.5 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure), so we decided to assume the same reduction in cardiovascular disease effect as assigned for chocolate (21%).10

:)
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elecjet

New York, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
elecjet wrote:
dr darden for some reason i never noticed this but most of your meals are this ratio. Should every meal be the ratio or could you sometimes just try to hit by the end of the day. Some meals i get more protien then carbs out of convience factors. Just wondering your thoughts

thank you

I have two houe cats who are 12 years old. They have never eaten anything but IAMS Cat Food, which comes in dry pellets in 4-pound bags. The breakdown of these pellets is proteins 28%, fats 29%, and carbohydrate 43% -- which is ideal for mature cats. Both cats are healthy and seem to thrive on the dry food.

I've often thought, wouldn't it be neat, if you could come up with some similar pellets for humans? It would certainly save most people a tremendous amount of time: limited food shopping, no cooking, simple eating arrangements, no costly kitchen utensils and appliances.

But I'll tell you this, my wife doesn't even like me to mention such concepts -- because she, and many people, disagree with such thinking. Food shopping and preparation, eating, and everything that goes with it, to them, is much more than just "eating."

But to get back to your question, yes, I believe that a 60/20/20 eating composition -- if you could stick with it for every meal -- would be ideal. Of course, that's not possible, in our society. But you can try.

And, yes, if you're off a little, or a lot, here and there -- you can compensate a little or a lot at the next meal. What happens as a result of 2-3 days of eating is probably more important that what happens at one meal.

Ah, but I still think about those pellets. If I could only change myself into a cat?

Ellington



excellent thank you. Yeah some of my meals are higher in protien sometimes. Mainly the snack but my main meals are spot on

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doug e fresh

what exactly is the 60-20-20 ratio?
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

doug e fresh wrote:
what exactly is the 60-20-20 ratio?


It is the ratio of food types that Dr. Darden has recommended in nearly all of his 42+ books. You should read some.

60% carbs, 20% protein and 20% fat.
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marcrph

Portugal

The American Heart Association recommends a 30% consumption level of fats in one's diet.

Studies have shown that people can be heathly even at higher levels of fat comsumption than 30%. The course of wisdom would be to pick only the healthiest fats at higher levels of fat consumption.

Marc
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doug e fresh

what's an easy way to calculate it? i still have alot to learn on nutrition
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doug e fresh

i also have yet to read any of dr darden's books. i just ordered the new HIT book
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QmAn

Ellington Darden wrote:
elecjet wrote:
dr darden for some reason i never noticed this but most of your meals are this ratio. Should every meal be the ratio or could you sometimes just try to hit by the end of the day. Some meals i get more protien then carbs out of convience factors. Just wondering your thoughts

thank you

I have two houe cats who are 12 years old. They have never eaten anything but IAMS Cat Food, which comes in dry pellets in 4-pound bags. The breakdown of these pellets is proteins 28%, fats 29%, and carbohydrate 43% -- which is ideal for mature cats. Both cats are healthy and seem to thrive on the dry food.

I've often thought, wouldn't it be neat, if you could come up with some similar pellets for humans? It would certainly save most people a tremendous amount of time: limited food shopping, no cooking, simple eating arrangements, no costly kitchen utensils and appliances.

But I'll tell you this, my wife doesn't even like me to mention such concepts -- because she, and many people, disagree with such thinking. Food shopping and preparation, eating, and everything that goes with it, to them, is much more than just "eating."

But to get back to your question, yes, I believe that a 60/20/20 eating composition -- if you could stick with it for every meal -- would be ideal. Of course, that's not possible, in our society. But you can try.

And, yes, if you're off a little, or a lot, here and there -- you can compensate a little or a lot at the next meal. What happens as a result of 2-3 days of eating is probably more important that what happens at one meal.

Ah, but I still think about those pellets. If I could only change myself into a cat?

Ellington



Hi Ellington

I've got a 12 year old cat too!

Tortorse shell colouring, he used to eat dry food all the time, but after a while he developed a kidney problem.

I took him to the vetanarian who said that it's because of a lack of water content in the dry food ( I think protein breakdown needs it or something ) and she suggested never feeding him dry food at every meal, always give one meal a day with much more moisture content (such as the pouches available).

You probably already knew this, but just in case you didn't, it should help prolong your cats life.

QmAn
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Ellington Darden

QmAm,

Thanks for the tip. My cats drink water, lots of it, throughout the day and night.

Ellington
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the_iron_goose

Cherry wrote:
The Polymeal is a partial meal replacement strategy to make it convenient to add some healthful ingrediants to your diet.

http://www.pubmedcentral.gov/...bmedid=15604180

We searched PubMed, informed by expert advice, for nonpharmacological ingredients with evidence levels 1 or 2: randomised controlled trials, meta-analyses of randomised controlled trials, and meta-analyses of observational studies.5 To be included in the Polymeal, the ingredient had to have individually reported effects (not as an element of a diet) on reduction in cardiovascular disease events or modification of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. We checked papers retrieved for further possible ingredients. The following dietary elements met the inclusion criteria to be ingredients of the Polymeal: wine, fish, dark chocolate, fruits and vegetables, almonds, and garlic (Allium sativum).

We obtained information from the literature on the benefits of the interventions (table 1). Daily consumption of 150 ml of wine reduces cardiovascular disease by 32% (95% confidence interval 33% to 41%).6 Fish (114 g) consumed four times a week reduces cardiovascular disease by 14% (8% to 19%).7 For chocolate, fruits and vegetables, almonds, and garlic, we found data on modification of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. One hundred grams of dark chocolate consumed daily reduces systolic blood pressure by 5.1 mm Hg and diastolic blood pressure by 1.8 mm Hg8; similar reductions in blood pressure correspond to a reduction in cardiovascular disease events of 21% (14% to 27%).9 A total of 400 g of fruit and vegetables consumed daily produced a reduction in blood pressure similar to that observed with chocolate (4.0 mm Hg systolic blood pressure and 1.5 mm Hg diastolic blood pressure), so we decided to assume the same reduction in cardiovascular disease effect as assigned for chocolate (21%).10

:)


I read this article on the polymeal above and I thought it was good informaiton. They sell frozen grilled fish fillets with a garlic topping geared towards a healthy lifestyle. A two serving package has per serving 100 calories, 3 grams fat, 0.5 sat fat, 0 trans fat, 1.0 g polyunsat fat, 1.5 g monounsat fat, 75 mg cholesterol, 320 mg sodium, 340 mg potassium, 1 g carbs total, and 17 g protein. Not a bad deal. In addition, you have your chioce of lemon butter topping or garlic. I read you the lemon butter one. I was avoiding the garlic. I am not sure why. I can see how easy it would be to follow such a plan.
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Cherry

marcrph wrote:
The American Heart Association recommends a 30% consumption level of fats in one's diet.

Studies have shown that people can be heathly even at higher levels of fat comsumption than 30%. The course of wisdom would be to pick only the healthiest fats at higher levels of fat consumption.

Marc


The AHA levels for fat are still too high. Do you recall that huge study reported recently in the news as the "low fat diet fails"? They found that moderate levels of dietary fat (~30%) had no or little effect on markers of CVD. They wrongly reported this as a failure of low fat diets but they problem with the study is they didn't go low enough to get results. Little changes result in little to no results. Cutting back 10 cigs a day will do little for a 2 pack plus smoker; larger liefstyle changes are necessary to see measurable results.

:)



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marcrph

Portugal

Cherry wrote:
marcrph wrote:
The American Heart Association recommends a 30% consumption level of fats in one's diet.

Studies have shown that people can be heathly even at higher levels of fat comsumption than 30%. The course of wisdom would be to pick only the healthiest fats at higher levels of fat consumption.

Marc

The AHA levels for fat are still too high. Do you recall that huge study reported recently in the news as the "low fat diet fails"? They found that moderate levels of dietary fat (~30%) had no or little effect on markers of CVD. They wrongly reported this as a failure of low fat diets but they problem with the study is they didn't go low enough to get results. Little changes result in little to no results. Cutting back 10 cigs a day will do little for a 2 pack plus smoker; larger liefstyle changes are necessary to see measurable results.

:)


Cherry,

One's goals should largely affect diet.
If one is trying to gain muscle mass, a larger caloric intake is necessary. If one is trying to maintain, then steady-state caloric intake is necessary. Even steady-state bodily calorie demands flucuate daily. If one is trying to lean out, and go for health, then, low fat levels can be used. I think Nathan Pritkin levels of 10-15 % are boderline even here. There must be some satiety in the diet, and a 10% fat consumption level is pushing things. There must be some fat for maintaining celluar functions, such as cell wall formation, and carrying testosterone around in the bloodstream. I will not mention a boring, tastless diet without fat included. As a resonable person can see readily, fat level consumption has many variables.

Very little information has been shared on this board about medium chain triglycerides(MCT's), as these saturated fats are metabolized in a different manner than other fats. A bodybuilder wanting to build mass, would be well advised to use MCT's, as one's metabolism would increase slightly. Protein intake increases metabolism slightly. Therefore, for a small time frame(window of opportunity) higher fat/protein consumption can be warranted.

For health, I personally want to be lean. I want the max out strength per bodyweight. As you age, one realizes mass for mass sake is insane, and this paradigm has all but destroyed bodybuilding. If you remember Roy Jones, pound for pound, one of the best boxers of ALL time, had quite a good physique, however, he was not trying to get as big as possible for most of his career.

Here in Atlanta, Evander Hollifield, bulked up to heavyweight status, but had quite a good physique. So GOALS do matter. As one ages, goals change. You can be of the best health, but time and unforeseen circumstances befall us all.

Marc
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Cherry

marcrph wrote:
Cherry wrote:
marcrph wrote:
The American Heart Association recommends a 30% consumption level of fats in one's diet.

Studies have shown that people can be heathly even at higher levels of fat comsumption than 30%. The course of wisdom would be to pick only the healthiest fats at higher levels of fat consumption.

Marc

The AHA levels for fat are still too high. Do you recall that huge study reported recently in the news as the "low fat diet fails"? They found that moderate levels of dietary fat (~30%) had no or little effect on markers of CVD. They wrongly reported this as a failure of low fat diets but they problem with the study is they didn't go low enough to get results. Little changes result in little to no results. Cutting back 10 cigs a day will do little for a 2 pack plus smoker; larger liefstyle changes are necessary to see measurable results.

:)


Cherry,

One's goals should largely affect diet.
If one is trying to gain muscle mass, a larger caloric intake is necessary. If one is trying to maintain, then steady-state caloric intake is necessary. Even steady-state bodily calorie demands flucuate daily. If one is trying to lean out, and go for health, then, low fat levels can be used. I think Nathan Pritkin levels of 10-15 % are boderline even here. There must be some satiety in the diet, and a 10% fat consumption level is pushing things. There must be some fat for maintaining celluar functions, such as cell wall formation, and carrying testosterone around in the bloodstream. I will not mention a boring, tastless diet without fat included. As a resonable person can see readily, fat level consumption has many variables.

Very little information has been shared on this board about medium chain triglycerides(MCT's), as these saturated fats are metabolized in a different manner than other fats. A bodybuilder wanting to build mass, would be well advised to use MCT's, as one's metabolism would increase slightly. Protein intake increases metabolism slightly. Therefore, for a small time frame(window of opportunity) higher fat/protein consumption can be warranted.

For health, I personally want to be lean. I want the max out strength per bodyweight. As you age, one realizes mass for mass sake is insane, and this paradigm has all but destroyed bodybuilding. If you remember Roy Jones, pound for pound, one of the best boxers of ALL time, had quite a good physique, however, he was not trying to get as big as possible for most of his career.

Here in Atlanta, Evander Hollifield, bulked up to heavyweight status, but had quite a good physique. So GOALS do matter. As one ages, goals change. You can be of the best health, but time and unforeseen circumstances befall us all.

Marc



I truly believe that the healthier lifestyle alternatives will also build the greatest amount of muscle tissue. Dr Darden has proved this time and time again over many decades! And again recently in his "Florida Dreamin" thread.

:)
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marcrph

Portugal

Cherry,

This is where I disagree with you strongly. To build excessive muscle mass (ie. bodybuilding), one must partake calories in excess of ordinary means. This has been shown emperically many times. To be big, you must eat excessive calories. Many studies, and emperical evidence show calorie restriction is the healthiest way to longevity of life. But, if you calorie restrict, you will limit your muscle gains. Insulin is one of the most anabolic hormones in the body. Lots of calories equal increased insulin levels.

Marc
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Cherry

marcrph wrote:
Cherry,

This is where I disagree with you strongly. To build excessive muscle mass (ie. bodybuilding), one must partake calories in excess of ordinary means. This has been shown emperically many times. To be big, you must eat excessive calories. Many studies, and emperical evidence show calorie restriction is the healthiest way to longevity of life. But, if you calorie restrict, you will limit your muscle gains. Insulin is one of the most anabolic hormones in the body. Lots of calories equal increased insulin levels.

Marc


If you consume excess cals (positive energy balance) won't you store fat? Excess cals by definition means more than you need or burn. Eating more than you use results in fat storage does it not?

:|
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splice

man cherry your a tool
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