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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

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The Mental Aspect of Training
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Yes

I was recently watching a documentary about US Navy SEALs that got me to re-evaluate some aspects of training...

As you probably already know, very few make it to the SEALs. You have to endure hours of physical training every day, ice cold water, lack of sleep and have to pay for every little mistake - there?s only place for winners.
These men are of course in good physical condition. However, nothing really exceptional. Still, I would say they are stronger than most men. Not because they have bulging muscles and can lift heavy weights - but because they are mentally strong.

Anyway, this got me thinking about failure(or rather beyond failure) and not to failure training. The debates always focus on how to build most muscle and the biggest strength. Now I havent read all the research about this, but from what I have gathered many of the conclusions are that you should atleast be careful not to train to much to failure(or beyond) - it?s just not the way to best results.

Now, this got me to a question. Say you wanted to become a SEAL, would you go for brutally intense workouts(of course given adequate rest and nutrition, so you wont destroy yourself) or less intense NTF training?

This is of course not a question for regular Joe who just wants to be healthy and get into good shape. But for us who take excercise and self improvement seriously, I think it is an interesting question.

For my own part I would like more muscle, more strength and lower bodyfat. This would make me look better and be stronger, which I think is desirable. However, when I go to the gym I wont get any imidiate results. Its just 45 minutes of pain - for what? Improving my body - that im already pretty darn happy with - over a very long time? Nah, what keeps me going is the challenge - and the only way to do that is to give 110 percent.

So, I guess my point is that going to failure - and beyond - adds a mental aspect to training. It might, or might not, be the shortest way to improving ones physique - but it gives a whole other aspect of strength. It?s the way of improving body AND mind.
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

For you question about what would be better for navy seals, you should read about Project Total Conditioning in TNHIT. It proves that aslong as you want to get in the best shape possible (Strength and Cardio) than HIT is the way to go.
Hope this helps.

Michael
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davise

From my experience in boot camp its not so much to get you in shape, but to see how much you can take mentally, physically, emotionally before you break. Once you break (and everyone does) they build you back up and fill you full of the values and ideals they want you to have. Brainwashing at its best.
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spud

Here is the first paragraph from an article by Drew Baye.

www.baye.com/articles/meditation.html

"Proper high intensity training is not only one of the most physically demanding activities a person could ever perform, it also requires considerable mental effort. In addition to focusing on intensely contracting the target musculature during each exercise, one must concentrate on numerous aspects of form such as maintaining proper body positioning and/or alignment, proper breathing, slow and controlled speed of movement, etc., all while experiencing rapidly intensifying physical discomfort. It's not easy to focus on one thing, much less two or three or more, when your muscles are burning, you're breathing like a woman in labor and your heart is pounding through your chest."

Read all that again. Look at all the different things that are going on. It sounds so chaotic, there is so much to think about and concentrate on.

This is why HIT can be so mentally taxing and why training in this manner is not popular.

It is far easier to do a few sets of something half heartedly whilst watching MTV than it is to put yourself through one set of what Drew has described above.
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TigerFighter VS

New Jersey, USA

When I played Football, we were all ingrained with the mantra, "How you practice is how you play". I would think if one were going for SEAL training, you should prepare for all out, as battle is never "Not To Failure."

My two cents...
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elecjet

New York, USA

spud wrote:
Here is the first paragraph from an article by Drew Baye.

www.baye.com/articles/meditation.html

"Proper high intensity training is not only one of the most physically demanding activities a person could ever perform, it also requires considerable mental effort. In addition to focusing on intensely contracting the target musculature during each exercise, one must concentrate on numerous aspects of form such as maintaining proper body positioning and/or alignment, proper breathing, slow and controlled speed of movement, etc., all while experiencing rapidly intensifying physical discomfort. It's not easy to focus on one thing, much less two or three or more, when your muscles are burning, you're breathing like a woman in labor and your heart is pounding through your chest."

Read all that again. Look at all the different things that are going on. It sounds so chaotic, there is so much to think about and concentrate on.

This is why HIT can be so mentally taxing and why training in this manner is not popular.

It is far easier to do a few sets of something half heartedly whilst watch MTV than it is to put yourself through one set of what Drew has described above.


Damn i hear that and understand it.

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Yes

bigmikep wrote:
For you question about what would be better for navy seals, you should read about Project Total Conditioning in TNHIT. It proves that aslong as you want to get in the best shape possible (Strength and Cardio) than HIT is the way to go.
Hope this helps.

Michael

Cant seem to find it... got any page numbers?

My question however, was mostly rhetorical. The point was that theres more than just the physical aspects to training. Even though you might get bigger and stronger not going to failure, that would only build soft muscle - when you perhaps would be smaller, but made of steel.
I think this is an important point, not to be overlooked in the failure or not to failure debates that often come up.

Of course HIT is great in this respect. However, I actually think that adding a little extra volume can sometimes be a good way to increase the effort.
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