MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Processed Foods
Author
Rating
Options

jason_m

I'm in college. I don't know how to cook. And if I did, for most of the year, I don't think I'd have the time to cook three or four meals a day, so, roughly one or two meals a day will come from processed food (even a sandwich usually has processed meat). Do you consider this to be unhealthy? How much processed food is too much? (Or are the problems related to processed food overblown?)

Jason.
Open User Options Menu

Cherry

In a word, yes. Processed invariably means too much fat and too little nutrients. People do not have faintest clue of how to eat and what to eat these days. It's really remarkable, and virtually impossible to rectify. It's so far out of hand and over the top that i have little hope.

:(
Open User Options Menu

splice

Cherry wrote:
In a word, yes. Processed invariably means too much fat and too little nutrients. People do not have faintest clue of how to eat and what to eat these days. It's really remarkable, and virtually impossible to rectify. It's so far out of hand and over the top that i have little hope.

:(



You have little hope but you also probably have never went to college before. It's very hard to eat a healthier meal while going to school.
Open User Options Menu

splice

also just to add this in, in most of Dr. Darden's studies he has people eating bagels in the morning and they are processed. All the people lost fat too. No you probably shouldnt eat them every meal but nonetheless.
Open User Options Menu

Cherry

splice wrote:
Cherry wrote:
In a word, yes. Processed invariably means too much fat and too little nutrients. People do not have faintest clue of how to eat and what to eat these days. It's really remarkable, and virtually impossible to rectify. It's so far out of hand and over the top that i have little hope.

:(


You have little hope but you also probably have never went to college before. It's very hard to eat a healthier meal while going to school.



you gotta be kiding on the college thing. good food is readliy available to everyone everywhere (in US). that excuse don't wash. from the commentary here, NO ONE nows anythiung at all about eating right. its amazing lack of congruency between what people eat (or think they should eat) and what science now tells us what is best. So disparate the discrepency that it is virtually hopeless.

unfortunately.

:(
Open User Options Menu

splice

Cherry wrote:
splice wrote:
Cherry wrote:
In a word, yes. Processed invariably means too much fat and too little nutrients. People do not have faintest clue of how to eat and what to eat these days. It's really remarkable, and virtually impossible to rectify. It's so far out of hand and over the top that i have little hope.

:(





you gotta be kiding on the college thing. good food is readliy available to everyone everywhere (in US). that excuse don't wash. from the commentary here, NO ONE nows anythiung at all about eating right. its amazing lack of congruency between what people eat (or think they should eat) and what science now tells us what is best. So disparate the discrepency that it is virtually hopeless.

unfortunately.

:(


yes and your vegan ways is the only way to go right? Give me a break.
Now i can definetly tell you have not been to college before. Enjoy running cherry/ seasame no one on this site has figured that out yet.
Open User Options Menu

writeknight

New Jersey, USA

Don't view it as an all-or-nothing proposition. If you are currently eating processed foods at every meal, and you improve your diet to eating them only at 50% of your meals, you've still made an improvement. As you learn more, see some progress in what you're doing, and expand your goals, you may want to take it to the next level and cut back even further.

It's important to make a long-term change in your habits, and often that is undermined when somebody shoots for the moon, does great for 2 weeks, messes up for a few days, feels like the sacrifice wasn't worth it anyway, and ends up right where they started.
Open User Options Menu

NewYorker

New York, USA

Here are a few ideas:
1) dry roasted soy nuts
2) fat free plain yogurt
3) dry skim milk powder
4) fresh or cut fruit
5) baby carrot sticks
6) salads
7) nuts
Open User Options Menu

Cherry

splice wrote:
Cherry wrote:
splice wrote:
Cherry wrote:
In a word, yes. Processed invariably means too much fat and too little nutrients. People do not have faintest clue of how to eat and what to eat these days. It's really remarkable, and virtually impossible to rectify. It's so far out of hand and over the top that i have little hope.

:(

you gotta be kiding on the college thing. good food is readliy available to everyone everywhere (in US). that excuse don't wash. from the commentary here, NO ONE nows anythiung at all about eating right. its amazing lack of congruency between what people eat (or think they should eat) and what science now tells us what is best. So disparate the discrepency that it is virtually hopeless.

unfortunately.

:(

yes and your vegan ways is the only way to go right? Give me a break.
Now i can definetly tell you have not been to college before. Enjoy running cherry/ seasame no one on this site has figured that out yet.



Splice, how hard is it to "brown bag" smthg then take that to class?

Seriously, for me, i would rather not eat at all skip lunch then to eat lunchmeat such as balogna, or chips, or vending machine hamburgers etc. I'd just skip it all together.

Why would college preclude healthy eating? No grocery stores close to campus, cmon ;)
Open User Options Menu

deanjones

Cherry wrote:
splice wrote:
Cherry wrote:
In a word, yes. Processed invariably means too much fat and too little nutrients. People do not have faintest clue of how to eat and what to eat these days. It's really remarkable, and virtually impossible to rectify. It's so far out of hand and over the top that i have little hope.

:(


You have little hope but you also probably have never went to college before. It's very hard to eat a healthier meal while going to school.



you gotta be kiding on the college thing. good food is readliy available to everyone everywhere (in US). that excuse don't wash. from the commentary here, NO ONE nows anythiung at all about eating right. its amazing lack of congruency between what people eat (or think they should eat) and what science now tells us what is best. So disparate the discrepency that it is virtually hopeless.

unfortunately.

:(


It's a very strange day when I find myself agreeing with Cherry on something. Today is one of those days. ;)
Open User Options Menu

splice

deanjones wrote:
Cherry wrote:
splice wrote:
Cherry wrote:
In a word, yes. Processed invariably means too much fat and too little nutrients. People do not have faintest clue of how to eat and what to eat these days. It's really remarkable, and virtually impossible to rectify. It's so far out of hand and over the top that i have little hope.

:(


You have little hope but you also probably have never went to college before. It's very hard to eat a healthier meal while going to school.



you gotta be kiding on the college thing. good food is readliy available to everyone everywhere (in US). that excuse don't wash. from the commentary here, NO ONE nows anythiung at all about eating right. its amazing lack of congruency between what people eat (or think they should eat) and what science now tells us what is best. So disparate the discrepency that it is virtually hopeless.

unfortunately.

:(

It's a very strange day when I find myself agreeing with Cherry on something. Today is one of those days. ;)


It's a sad day for all but once again he has never been to college. Sure you can always brown bag something but sometimes it might be odd to eat in class or even on the go for some people. Personally i can care less i'll eat whatever i have when i am on the move.

Open User Options Menu

deanjones

When I'm on the go, I have a meal replacement bar. They're about $2.50 at Publix (for the Myoplex ones) and they're good. That may sound expensive but you can barely get a meal even at home for $2.50.

Hell, go to McDonalds or your fast food place of choice and show me a full meal for under $2.50... The Myoplex bars are also a lot better than a trans fat filled hamburger.

Almonds, Pecans, Natural Peanut butter, Turkey, etc... All very cheap and great sources of nutrients and can all be eaten on the go.

I've never been to college either, but that has little to do with anything. I've been at a point in my life where I was studying personally (since I couldn't afford University) and working full time and could only afford rent and utilities and had very a little less than $50 a week for food. I managed to do fine as far as eating decent foods and still able to stick to my busy work schedule and study during the night.

Ultimately it comes down to laziness. I used to be lazy and made excuses for not eating well either... Eating better usually requires actually making the food you eat and a lot of us are simply too lazy to do that. I'm guilty of it from time to time as well. However, I feel much better after a turkey and whole grain sandwich on the go than I do with a nasty fast food burger any day (non fast food burgers discluded ;)

I think even on the minimalist of budgets, you can find a way to eat properly. It just may take more work than you want.

Open User Options Menu

Swedish Viking

California, USA

The less processed the better. I have been to college and so have many others, I'm assuming. You can definitely get good meals in. Infact, they can be of the same quality any other meal, you just have to plan ahead. I worked full time and went to college full time and barely ever missed a meal. Now I work more than full time and eat all raw and organic and still never miss a meal. Just plan and make it happen.
Open User Options Menu

Cherry

Diets that are high in trans fats may lead to weight gain around the middle, even when calories are reduced, a new U.S. study finds.




[PROCESSED FOOD is commonly rich in trans fats!]



Computed tomography (CT) scans showed that the monkeys on the diet containing trans fats had dramatically more abdominal fat than the monkeys on the monounsaturated fat.

"Diets rich in trans fat cause a redistribution of fat tissue into the abdomen and lead to a higher body weight even when the total dietary calories are controlled," said Lawrence L. Rudel, Ph.D., professor of pathology and biochemistry and head of the Lipid Sciences Research Program.

http://www.nutritionhorizon.co...


Another study showing that eating "natural" less processed food like vegetables, fruit, and legumes help to prevent that spare tire.

:)
Open User Options Menu

Cherry

Animal studies suggest vegetables may reduce hardening arteries

There is another reason vegetables may be so good for us. A study in mice found that a mixture of five common vegetables reduced hardening of the arteries by 38 percent compared to animals eating a non-vegetable diet, according to research reported in the latest issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

"While everyone knows that eating more vegetables is supposed to be good for you, no one had shown before that it can actually inhibit the development of atherosclerosis," said Michael Adams, lead researcher from Wake Forest University. "This suggests how a diet high in vegetables may help prevent heart attacks and strokes."

The study used specially bred mice which were prone to rapidly develop atherosclerosis. Half of the mice in the study were fed a vegetable-free diet and half got 30 percent of their calories from a mixture of freeze-dried broccoli, green beans, corn, peas and carrots.

After 16 weeks, the researchers measured two forms of cholesterol to estimate the extent of atherosclerosis. In the vegetable group, plaques in the blood vessels were 38 percent smaller than those in the mice fed vegetable-free diets. There were also modest improvements in body weight and cholesterol levels in the blood.

Adams said it was not clear exactly how the high-vegetable diet influenced the development of plaques in the artery walls. "Although the pathways involved are uncertain, the results indicate that a diet rich in green and yellow vegetables inhibits the development of hardening of the arteries and may reduce the risk of heart disease."

Numerous studies in humans have shown that a high-vegetable diet is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, as well as with a reduction in blood pressure and an increase in "good" cholesterol. This is believed to be the first study to address the effect of increased vegetable consumption on the development or progression of atherosclerosis.
Open User Options Menu

BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Cherry wrote:
Seriously, for me, i would rather not eat at all skip lunch then to eat lunchmeat such as balogna, or chips, or vending machine hamburgers etc. I'd just skip it all together.


You sound like a 100-pound high school girl.

Throw the all-or-nothing mentality out of the window. It's amazing how some people would rather focus on the 5% that failed rather than the 95% that succeeded. Jason, do your best for now. You'll have plenty of time after school to dial down your diet if you feel like the one you followed in college wasn't good for you in the end.
Open User Options Menu

HamsFitness

everything in moderation - including moderation.

Fitness isnt just physical.

If you are not happy with your diet be it good or bad then you are not fit.

Some good, some bad - makes good.

good makes happy.

Me tarzan
Open User Options Menu

Cherry

Speaking of maintaining muscle mass into advancing age..


Stay young by eating very little, study says

Michelle Lang
CanWest News Service; Calgary Herald

Thursday, July 06, 2006

CALGARY -- A successful diet may do more than trim the waistline.

University of Calgary scientists say old-fashioned calorie counting could also be the key to maintaining young muscles as we age.

In a study to be published this month in the Journal of Gerontology: Biological Sciences, the researchers found that elderly rats on a calorie-restricted diet had the muscle mass and function of much younger rats.

"It's the equivalent of an 80-year-old rat with the muscles of a 20-year-old rat," said Russ Hepple, a University of Calgary physiologist, in an interview Wednesday.

The study examined rats bred at the U.S.-based National Institute of Aging. From a young age, the rats ate about 40 per cent fewer calories than normal, although their diet was rich in nutrition.

Hepple's study the second in a series examining the effects of calorie restriction found that elderly rodents on the strict diet experienced only a 20 per cent drop in muscle mass and no loss of muscle function.

By contrast, rats eating a normal diet lost 50 per cent of their muscle mass and 50 per cent of their muscle function at old age.

"We know (calorie restriction) extends life span. What we've shown is it also maintains muscle function," said David Barker, a post-doctoral student who worked on the research.

Indeed, scientists have known for years that reduced-calorie diets extend the life expectancy of rats by as much as 35 per cent.

Hepple is still trying to understand why restricting calories helps aging muscles.

The study suggests restricted-calorie diets preserve the function of mitochondria which provide the body's cells with energy as the animals grow old.

The diets appear to help the aging rats rebuild and replace muscle.

Although cutting calories had a profound impact on rat muscles, Hepple said he wouldn't advocate the average person reduce their food intake by 40 per cent.

"The restriction of calories is so severe it's impractical," he said.

Instead, he said humans need to eat a healthy diet, refrain from overindulging and remain active to maintain their muscles.

In the meantime, his research team will embark on further studies with antioxidants, exercise and gene therapy to see if factors other than fewer calories can lead to younger muscles in old age.

http://www.canada.com/...13-a04746fdcce5



Eatint too much leads to a decline in muscle?!

This is quite remarkable considering that "overeating" is a tenet in most bodybuilding circles to getting size and strength!


Open User Options Menu

BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Cherry wrote:
Eatint too much leads to a decline in muscle?!

This is quite remarkable considering that "overeating" is a tenet in most bodybuilding circles to getting size and strength!


The study didn't give enough information on the rats' diets. And what is a "normal" diet for rats?

Rats tend to have a lot of bodyfat, so if a normal diet is making their lives shorter, a reduced-calore diet is basically a healthier diet for them anyway. Lab rats have all the food they can eat, while wild rats have to go days without food, making the bodyfat necessary.

Please note that BOTH rats lost muscle mass. Preserving muscle function... even very people and the elderly have all their muscles functioning. Big deal.

That was a very misleading study, and not all that applicable for us humans.
Open User Options Menu

Cherry

BFBullpup wrote:
Cherry wrote:
Eatint too much leads to a decline in muscle?!

This is quite remarkable considering that "overeating" is a tenet in most bodybuilding circles to getting size and strength!


The study didn't give enough information on the rats' diets. And what is a "normal" diet for rats?

Rats tend to have a lot of bodyfat, so if a normal diet is making their lives shorter, a reduced-calore diet is basically a healthier diet for them anyway. Lab rats have all the food they can eat, while wild rats have to go days without food, making the bodyfat necessary.

Please note that BOTH rats lost muscle mass. Preserving muscle function... even very people and the elderly have all their muscles functioning. Big deal.

That was a very misleading study, and not all that applicable for us humans.



ok professor ;)
Open User Options Menu
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy