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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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1 - Legged Squat - Oh Baby!
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Cherry

ok, you're a big squatter, right? you use a ton of weight, right?

ok, how many reps of 1-legged squats can you do?

they are darn hard!

but to do them right: do them on a raised surface to let the resting leg dangle without touching the floor. don't touch anything with your hands or fingers either, but close to a wall to use ONE FINGER to regain your OCCASSIONALY loss of balance. But otherwise, BALANCE yourself. Move SLOWLY emphasizing the BOTTOM THREE QUARTERS of the squat,and never go above it! Stay out of that top 1/4 position!

How many can you do? A real eye opener !!

:)
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JJ McClinton

Arthur Jones once said in "My First Half Century in the Iron Game" that one could get most of the benefits of resistance training without spending more than $20 bucks. He said that chins and dips properly applied would get your torso and arms very close to their genetic potential. He than added that your hips and legs could get near to their maximum strength and size with bodyweight full squats, then working up to bodyweight one legged squats and one legged calf raises.

Dr. Darden once mentioned that Jones said he could make a HIT routine with bodyweight only resistance that would knock most advance trainees on their asses. I personally think he could've.
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Cherry

I didn't know AJ said that about squats..
thank you for that!

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karma50

guys,
I think it would be great to have a minimalist bw routine for HIT. I did a lot of bw exercises and kept quite fit out of the gym for years. When I joined a gym, and got my free session with a "trainer", she was shocked that I could do 12 pullups (overhand) and 15 bw dips, and a one legged squat on each leg. She said, "you don't need me". But you have to think of ways to make the exercise harder. (jreps?) My minimalist home gym will be equipped with a chin/dip station, adjustable dumbbells, an adjustable bench of some sort, and maybe some sand bags. Probably a few other odds and ends but that will be the core. I hate going to the gym, and would like to limit it to once a week, and work out a home the rest of the time.
Griff
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JJ McClinton

My home gym set up right now.

1. Bowflex Ultimate 1 (still like this one better than the Ultimate 2)
2. Power Block dumbbell set (5lbs to 130lbs each hand)
3. Roman Chair (I use it for squats)
4. Dips and Chin Station
5. Hyperextension Bench
6. Heavy adujustable bench

I personally prefer this over any gym on the planet. Home is where the heart is, and my training greatly improved when I started working out at home. I still trained at home when I was living in a one bedroom apartment. Had the Bowflex and the Power Blocks and still got great workouts.

The only thing I would change would be to add a Nautilus or Hammer Strength Neck Machine. A Boy can dream.

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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

DIABOLIK wrote:
Dr. Darden once mentioned that Jones said he could make a HIT routine with bodyweight only resistance that would knock most advance trainees on their asses. I personally think he could've.


I wonder if Jones ever followed up on that boast. I'd love to see a program like that. Not just for myself for variety, but I have friends who want to get into shape but are too lazy or intimidated to go to a gym. Yeah, yeah, I know. If that's their attitude they can forget about getting into shape. :-P

Cherry, have you tried doing "pistols"? Basically it's one-legged squats with you standing on flat ground. You extend the free leg right in front of you rather than hang it off a platform. Good stuff.
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hit4all

Sweden

Anyone seen Jackie Chan in Drunken Master 1 and 2? In thoose movies he performed one legged squats without balance support and his other leg are also stretched out parallell to the floor.

He didn't perform them slowly, but still very impressive.
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HamsFitness

I hate to brag but pistols...20 in a row is my record to date :)

10 with a 20k plate held to chest

naturally with no help or balance aids
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hit4all

Sweden

Wizard wrote:
I hate to brag but pistols...20 in a row is my record to date :)


You're not braging..... if you can prove it! :)
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NATUREBOY

One-legged squats seem awefully dangerous, and I don't see how they can be more productive than regular BB squats.

Wow, you have good balance? So what!

:p
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Cherry

NATUREBOY wrote:
One-legged squats seem awefully dangerous, and I don't see how they can be more productive than regular BB squats.

Wow, you have good balance? So what!

:p


Must move slowly and carefully, very methodical and controlled, and I believe they may be safer than a barbell squat. No dangerous heavy load on your shoulders compressing your spine.

Also, too many degrees of freedom to cheat the weight up with the barbell squat, imo. Small nuances in position of the lumbar spine with rep is impossible to overcome, and these small changes in position can make a big difference in how the load is distributed over the musculature and skeletal frame.

IMO, it's easier to control the position of the spine to the hip & lower extremities without that heavy "awkward" load on your back making the 1-leggeg Sq more effecient and productive.

:)
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NATUREBOY

Cherry wrote:
Must move slowly and carefully, very methodical and controlled, and I believe they may be safer than a barbell squat. No dangerous heavy load on your shoulders compressing your spine.

Also, too many degrees of freedom to cheat the weight up with the barbell squat, imo. Small nuances in position of the lumbar spine with rep is impossible to overcome, and these small changes in position can make a big difference in how the load is distributed over the musculature and skeletal frame.

IMO, it's easier to control the position of the spine to the hip & lower extremities without that heavy "awkward" load on your back making the 1-leggeg Sq more effecient and productive.

:)


One-legged squats are a good way to get yourself hurt.

I would NEVER advocate anybody performing this exercise.
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JJ McClinton

Some people can do them, some cannot. Just like the barbell squat, some people just can't squat correctly no matter how long they have been practicing. Give them a try before passing judgement. Arthur Jones' eldest son built great hips and thighs from this one movement alone.

You are right though in saying that this exercise can be dangerous but, so can any other exercise performed incorrectly. It is a skill movement and people who have not been practicing it for very long need to ensure that their are precautions around them so that they won't get hurt when they fall on their butt the first couple times.

As far as unilateral loading is concerned I have never had a problem with this when doing one legged squats. It is sort of like the one armed chin or pushup. I would practice both arms and legs and build up strength and skill with both limbs before doing one limbed just like Arthur stated.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

NATUREBOY wrote:
One-legged squats are a good way to get yourself hurt.

I would NEVER advocate anybody performing this exercise.


Wasn't it his own one-legged squat mishap that propelled Ken Hutchins into the realm of back rehab work and his puperslow?

Something about trying to relax one side while concentrating on the leg being worked and he wrenched the hell out his back...
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

NATUREBOY wrote:
One-legged squats are a good way to get yourself hurt.

I would NEVER advocate anybody performing this exercise.


I think barbell squats do more for you than one-leggeds. However, one-leggeds are definitely safer, partly because of the reasons outlined above by Cherry.

Nature Boy, perhaps you could give more examples of how one-legged would be dangerous, other than falling over from the loss of balance? And that shouldn't happen as long as you know your balance limitations and support yourself accordingly.
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

simon-hecubus wrote:
Wasn't it his own one-legged squat mishap that propelled Ken Hutchins into the realm of back rehab work and his puperslow?

Something about trying to relax one side while concentrating on the leg being worked and he wrenched the hell out his back...


Haha Simon, you posted just as I was posting. I'm not familiar with his work, but I'm wondering if he already had a bad back to begin with? I don't have any lower back problems and I never experienced discomfort doing those. You just need to make a point of doing the reps slowly and with control.
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NATUREBOY

BFBullpup wrote:
Nature Boy, perhaps you could give more examples of how one-legged would be dangerous, other than falling over from the loss of balance?


That's the principle risk - falling down. You could also dislocate your knee or ankle or hip. Or drop the plate on your toes. Or collapse on the platform and crack your tailbone.
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Cherry

simon-hecubus wrote:
NATUREBOY wrote:
One-legged squats are a good way to get yourself hurt.

I would NEVER advocate anybody performing this exercise.

Wasn't it his own one-legged squat mishap that propelled Ken Hutchins into the realm of back rehab work and his puperslow?

Something about trying to relax one side while concentrating on the leg being worked and he wrenched the hell out his back...



It's so well-known it's axiomatic that anyone with a "bad back" can't and shouldn't barbell squat. The loads on lumbar spine are TREMENDOUS, even with good form! And those loads INCREASE as fatigue sets in and the trainee starts to bend even further forward to recruit more and more of the spinae erector fibers of the lumbar spine in his effort to stand up.

:|
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Cherry wrote:
It's so well-known it's axiomatic that anyone with a "bad back" can't and shouldn't barbell squat. The loads on lumbar spine are TREMENDOUS, even with good form! And those loads INCREASE as fatigue sets in and the trainee starts to bend even further forward to recruit more and more of the spinae erector fibers of the lumbar spine in his effort to stand up.

:|


Your point being that if your back can't take a barbell squat, it shouldn't be doing one-legged squats, either?
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Cherry

BFBullpup wrote:
Cherry wrote:
It's so well-known it's axiomatic that anyone with a "bad back" can't and shouldn't barbell squat. The loads on lumbar spine are TREMENDOUS, even with good form! And those loads INCREASE as fatigue sets in and the trainee starts to bend even further forward to recruit more and more of the spinae erector fibers of the lumbar spine in his effort to stand up.

:|

Your point being that if your back can't take a barbell squat, it shouldn't be doing one-legged squats, either?



how many can you do? i bet not very..

why is that since you can barbell squat with so much??

right now, i'm doing 1-Leg Squat ISO's at 3 different positions along the joint curve.. very taxing! i find it hard to believe that my thighs won't grow larger or stronger!
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elecjet

New York, USA

i decided to give these a go for something different and man they are great. I felt these (which means nothing) more then two legged squats. Everything in the lower body is sore being quads, hams, straight to the calves and also my ass is throbbing lol. Strange thing is this is the best worked i have received especially for my calves they were pumped to hell.

I am not saying they are better then two leg but for now i would like to try them. I have good balance so this isnt an issue it's just hard well doing them one-legged.

I am trying something different for now.

I am doing two sets of one legged squats, two sets of chins and two sets of dips per workout. This has me wiped at the end but i love it.

Anyways give them a shot you will be very suprised because the body knows resistance that's it.
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Cherry wrote:
BFBullpup wrote:
Cherry wrote:
It's so well-known it's axiomatic that anyone with a "bad back" can't and shouldn't barbell squat. The loads on lumbar spine are TREMENDOUS, even with good form! And those loads INCREASE as fatigue sets in and the trainee starts to bend even further forward to recruit more and more of the spinae erector fibers of the lumbar spine in his effort to stand up.

:|

Your point being that if your back can't take a barbell squat, it shouldn't be doing one-legged squats, either?


how many can you do? i bet not very..

why is that since you can barbell squat with so much??

right now, i'm doing 1-Leg Squat ISO's at 3 different positions along the joint curve.. very taxing! i find it hard to believe that my thighs won't grow larger or stronger!


Cherry, no offense, but I am not interested in how many one-leggeds I can do. I'm more interested in why you said that barbell squats are bad for the back in your response to NatureBoy's post about Ken Hutchins injuring his back. Ken wasn't even doing barbell squats when he injured his back. Were you trying to say that barbell squats made his back weaker so that it couldn't handle one-leggeds? What?
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Cherry

BFBullpup wrote:
Cherry wrote:
BFBullpup wrote:
Cherry wrote:
It's so well-known it's axiomatic that anyone with a "bad back" can't and shouldn't barbell squat. The loads on lumbar spine are TREMENDOUS, even with good form! And those loads INCREASE as fatigue sets in and the trainee starts to bend even further forward to recruit more and more of the spinae erector fibers of the lumbar spine in his effort to stand up.

:|

Your point being that if your back can't take a barbell squat, it shouldn't be doing one-legged squats, either?


how many can you do? i bet not very..

why is that since you can barbell squat with so much??

right now, i'm doing 1-Leg Squat ISO's at 3 different positions along the joint curve.. very taxing! i find it hard to believe that my thighs won't grow larger or stronger!

Cherry, no offense, but I am not interested in how many one-leggeds I can do. I'm more interested in why you said that barbell squats are bad for the back in your response to NatureBoy's post about Ken Hutchins injuring his back. Ken wasn't even doing barbell squats when he injured his back. Were you trying to say that barbell squats made his back weaker so that it couldn't handle one-leggeds? What?



Nothing to specifically with Ken except to say that lots people have been hurt doing the barbell squat but you don't see anyone banning it.
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SanDiego

The way most people squat, I would agree that one legged squats would be better.

IMO, most people abuse the barbell squat with too much weight and too little range of motion. A one legged squat forces you to use decent form and allows for a deep stretch in the bottom position, which I think is key to good leg growth.

Although barbell squats done correctly with a full, deep ROM and a tightly starched upper body that allows one to reach that same stretch position at the very bottom are far more productive than anything else, IMO.
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JJ McClinton

I read the article in which Ken Hutchins hurt his back. He was doing one legged squats on a machine that was somewhat similar in style to the Body Masters squat machine except the machine Hutchins was on has your feet flat, the Body Masters version has your feet on an incline. So technically he wasn't doing bodyweight one legged squats.

If you ever need to progress in weight with the one legged squat I would recommend investing in a weighted vest (like the XVEST recommended on the IART). These vests also make weighted chins and dips a little more bearable. Having a weight plate or dumbbell dangling between my legs never made me feel comfortable to begin with.
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