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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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The New Bodybuilding for
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This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

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1 - Legged Squat - Oh Baby!
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Cherry

maybe holding plates on the chest too for additional resistance.

this exercise feels very pure
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JCS60

I have a bodyweight HIT routine that I perform at home:

Chins
Dips
Horizontal Rows
Pushups
Squats
One-legged Calf Raises
Crunches

I like it & it's worked well for me.

Jay
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dalinden

Some of you may not consider this a serious fitness machine, but, in addition to my Bowflex, I also use a Total Trainer. This is like a Total Gym, but better built and much less expensive. At the top level, you are pushing 71% of your body weight, but you can add up to 200 lbs. of barbell plates. You can do one legged squats with your back fully supported, much like a hack squat machine. I suspect that it is safer for your back and hips than doing them freestyle. You can do a lot of other exercises as well and I find it a nice change of pace from my Bowflex.
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elecjet

New York, USA

JCS60 wrote:
I have a bodyweight HIT routine that I perform at home:

Chins
Dips
Horizontal Rows
Pushups
Squats
One-legged Calf Raises
Crunches

I like it & it's worked well for me.

Jay



i see you do bodyweight squats but can't you do tons of these? Wouldn't you have to have some sort of weight on you to make it more beneficial.
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Cherry

JCS60 wrote:
I have a bodyweight HIT routine that I perform at home:

Chins
Dips
Horizontal Rows
Pushups
Squats
One-legged Calf Raises
Crunches

I like it & it's worked well for me.

Jay



what are horizontal rows?
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mufasta

Ive always like one legged squats. Ive never felt they were any more dangerous than squats, probably less though since you dont have a weight on your shoulder. I would recommend that you start with holding onto something to get used to the balance points and the motion. I used dbells to added weight. Helps maintain balance and holding 10-20 lbs on each arm is easy to hold/drop.

Still am curious as to how they can be more dangerous? Aside from the obvious, just like every exercices, that were already stated, how is it more dangerous?
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Cherry

mufasta wrote:
Ive always like one legged squats. Ive never felt they were any more dangerous than squats, probably less though since you dont have a weight on your shoulder. I would recommend that you start with holding onto something to get used to the balance points and the motion. I used dbells to added weight. Helps maintain balance and holding 10-20 lbs on each arm is easy to hold/drop.

Still am curious as to how they can be more dangerous? Aside from the obvious, just like every exercices, that were already stated, how is it more dangerous?



Always raises my eyebrows when i find an exercise that i can't use anywhere near half the weight in unilateral fashion, than i can bilaterally. the squat exercise is just such a find.

a 300 lb squatter will not be able to do 1-leggers with 150. that tells me the bilateral squat is flawed somewhere. Somwehere in the barbell squat a whole lotta "cheatin' is going on.

the 1-legger is ALL muscle work!
:)

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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

mufasta wrote:
Still am curious as to how they can be more dangerous? Aside from the obvious, just like every exercices, that were already stated, how is it more dangerous?


Don't bother. I asked the same thing here and I'm still waiting for a straight answer.
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Bill Crawford

Arizona, USA

Cherry wrote:
Always raises my eyebrows when i find an exercise that i can't use anywhere near half the weight in unilateral fashion, than i can bilaterally. the squat exercise is just such a find.

a 300 lb squatter will not be able to do 1-leggers with 150. that tells me the bilateral squat is flawed somewhere. Somwehere in the barbell squat a whole lotta "cheatin' is going on.

the 1-legger is ALL muscle work!
:)



Part of the answer may be that the weight you use in squat (one or two legged) is your body weight PLUS whatever is on the bar. If you halve the weight on the bar, you haven't really halved the total weight, because you still have to squat your body weight.

Thanks,

Mac
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SanDiego

Agreed... you can't make that comparison. A 300 pound squatter is squatting 300 lbs + BW. If the squatter weights 200 lbs, that's 500 total or 250 lbs per leg.

Halfing the weight on the bar AND using only one leg equates to 150 lbs + BW... 150 lbs + 200 lbs = 350 lbs on just one leg...

That's a substantial increase, even though the weight on the bar is decreased by half in the one-legged version.
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JJ McClinton

For those that asked, supposedly the only real danger of one legged squats is unilateral loading. Unilateral loading became a big no no in HIT circles because Ken Hutchins hurt his back doing one legged squats on a machine. Remember this was on a machine with weight still imposed upon on his traps and back yet he felt that it was doing them in a single limbed manner that in theory injured him. Remember, everything that Ken Hutchins says is right. Right?
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

DIABOLIK wrote:
For those that asked, supposedly the only real danger of one legged squats is unilateral loading. Unilateral loading became a big no no in HIT circles because Ken Hutchins hurt his back doing one legged squats on a machine. Remember this was on a machine with weight still imposed upon on his traps and back yet he felt that it was doing them in a single limbed manner that in theory injured him. Remember, everything that Ken Hutchins says is right. Right?


Haha, thanks. :-)
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karma50

Dalinden,
The Total Trainer does appear to be better made, and cheaper. I'm trying to find one to look at. It look to be easier on th old joints, too, expecially for leg exercises.

Guys,
These ain''t exactly one-legged squats, but sort of. The study at this link looked at people doing step-ups at knee height, one leg at a time (obviously), carrying 25% of their bw. According to the study, it caused muscle protein uptake comparable to resistance training and "long term activation of PKB" (protein kinase B) Sounds brutal.
Worth a read. It's on PubMed, and Michael Rennie's home page.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/...t_uids=16263770

Regards,
Griff
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JJ McClinton

I don't know if anyone is still interested in this thread but here is a link to a video of a fella who is pretty low tech in his equipment selection (which is fine because you can still get excellent results) and who does explosive lifts. If you can stomach that, about a minute and thirty seconds or so in he is performing bodyweight one legged squats in pretty good form. It would be safer to perform these on a flat surface (i.e. a floor) instead of outside but still I thought some who are new to this exercise would enjoy a look.

http://www.rosstraining.com/...thehomegym.html

Now add a weighted vest or if you can, holding a dumbbell or weight plate and you have a pretty good progressive exercise for the glutes, quadriceps, and hamstrings without the compression of a barbell on your spine. I haven't put a barbell on my back for two years and have done soley dumbbell squats and deadlifts, step ups, lunges, one legged squats, and roman chair squats for my multi-joint lower body work and have gotten better leg development without the risk to my spine and no knee problems.
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Crotalus

Great link , thanks for posting it.

All that stuff looks tough expecially that one arm roll out! As far as adding weight to the one leg squats ; shit on that, LOL. I've tried them a few times and they were hard enough with just BW. I never stuck with them, convicing myself I should be doing something else like barbell squat's LP, or DL's but in all honesty the one leg squats were just too hard !

I couldn't even consider trying them without holding onto something. One thing shown there that I have done in the past are the towel pull ups which are a nice change from regular ones even if you are inside and not utilizing a tree, LOL.

Real good stuff here , thanks again.
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jn6047

I personally don't bother with any exericse that puts me in an "awkward" position (1 leg leg press, 1 leg squat, etc) or is limited in regards to progressive resistance.

jn6047
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Cherry

jn6047 wrote:
I personally don't bother with any exericse that puts me in an "awkward" position (1 leg leg press, 1 leg squat, etc) or is limited in regards to progressive resistance.

jn6047


I agree there is a balance issue but the two-leg squat is such a sukky exercise. The emphasis is on the low back. Too many variables built-in to the 2-leg squat.

But with 1-leg lock&load that thigh and hip explodes! The focus is incredible.. like night & day!

;))

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marcrph

Portugal

Paul Anderson, the king of the squat, did 1-legged squats.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Pre exhausting the quads with Leg Extension and Leg Press helps. This way you don't find the low back giving out before the quads.

Regards,
Andrew
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Cherry

AShortt wrote:
Pre exhausting the quads with Leg Extension and Leg Press helps. This way you don't find the low back giving out before the quads.

Regards,
Andrew


yea but that just defeats the purpose doesn't it. a good exercise stands on its own

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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Cherry wrote:
AShortt wrote:
Pre exhausting the quads with Leg Extension and Leg Press helps. This way you don't find the low back giving out before the quads.

Regards,
Andrew

yea but that just defeats the purpose doesn't it. a good exercise stands on its own



Perhaps if you only use one exercise per workout...GTBKM
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spud

I have tried one legged squatting in the past.

I could hear my knees. I stopped and have never done them since.
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STanner

Texas, USA

There is a lot of skill in the 1-legged squat. I can recall being able to do 1-legged squats with 2 glasses of high-proof whiskey in my belly, mostly because I had been praticing them daily.
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Cherry

STanner wrote:
There is a lot of skill in the 1-legged squat. I can recall being able to do 1-legged squats with 2 glasses of high-proof whiskey in my belly, mostly because I had been praticing them daily.


...while touching your nose from outstretched arms?

lol

;)

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STanner

Texas, USA

Cherry wrote:
STanner wrote:
There is a lot of skill in the 1-legged squat. I can recall being able to do 1-legged squats with 2 glasses of high-proof whiskey in my belly, mostly because I had been praticing them daily.

...while touching your nose from outstretched arms?

lol

;)


;)

You know, my friend was trying to give me a "makeshift sobriety" test and I thought I'd throw that in for kicks.

Since I'm out of practice, I'd fall on my ass, but it's a great example of how much skill is involved in lifting.
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