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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

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Reconciling the Paradox: Cardio Efficient or NOT?
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NATUREBOY


The good news though is that exercise helps in losing excessive weight by accelerating the basal metabolic rate for a considerable period of time even after the exercise ends. In other words, your body burns more calories/hour during rest if you exercise regularly than if you were sedentary."


What's the verdict on this?

I know running 1 mile might only burn 100 calories over RMR, but what about the "side effects"?

I've never seen a fat runner/jogger.
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elecjet

New York, USA

NATUREBOY wrote:

The good news though is that exercise helps in losing excessive weight by accelerating the basal metabolic rate for a considerable period of time even after the exercise ends. In other words, your body burns more calories/hour during rest if you exercise regularly than if you were sedentary."


What's the verdict on this?

I know running 1 mile might only burn 100 calories over RMR, but what about the "side effects"?

I've never seen a fat runner/jogger.


Damn come where i live i see them all the time

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spud

What is meant by "exercise" in that quote?

I have seen a few fat joggers. The ones who stick to it consistently aren't fat, but they are actually that lean (or muscular) either.
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Cherry

Sprinting burns more cals per minute than marathon running but how long can you keep it up?

HIT is akin to sprinting.


Anaerobic high-intensity exercise (whether sprinting or HIT) burns more cals in short run, it does not burn more cals in the LONG run (pun intended ;)

I can operate @ ~80-85% VO2 for quite a long time. But step me up to 95-100% i'll be wasted posthaste!

Also, another factor that no one wants to say here is that initially, first 2-30 mins(?), GLYCOGEN stores in muscle is utilized perferentially. Only after sig glycogen depletion are the fat stores tapped for energy. You have to get thru 20-30 mins of exercise before you get to the fat!

Now, having said that, this is not precisely true. In acuality, %'s from both are tapped from the get-go BUT GLYCOGEN is the most easily assimilable, readily available and in abundance (assuming a sufficientlt high carb diet).

So, MOSTLY glycogen is tapped initially and a much smaller % of adipose. As the exercise continues in time glycogen stores deplete and more & more fat stores are tapped for energy.

So, you can see that TIME plays an important role in just what type of energy source is utilized.

So, yea, STEADY-STATE moderate-intensity cardio can burn up sig cals.

:)
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NATUREBOY

spud wrote:
What is meant by "exercise" in that quote?

I have seen a few fat joggers. The ones who stick to it consistently aren't fat, but they are actually that lean (or muscular) either.


They mean "running".
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NATUREBOY

100 calories over RMR per mile covered just can't be THE WHOLE STORY.
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Feb221732

If you guys have never seen a fat runner/jogger, I would say you need to get out more. Everytime I walk into the cardio theatre room at my gym, I see mostly overweight individuals slaving away on elipticals, treadmills, and bikes. I couldn't count the number of times I have seen a fat runner or jogger on the side of the road when I am driving to work or school.

But you also see overweight individuals in the strength training areas as well. The answer here is not just exercise, but obviously watching what we put down our gullets through our pie holes.

Ted
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jrholt

Tennessee, USA

I take in joggers between 40 and 60 years old who are having trouble losing the fat they have slowly gained over the years of constant running. I then train them for strength and they lose the body fat very quickly! Strength training is where it is.

Jeff
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karma50

Jeff,
You are so right. The cardio section in my gym is full of machines with overweight people using them, some I've seen for months, puffing away. They just don't seem to lose weight. I used to be a dedicated runner. No more. Dr. Darden is dead right about this. And the health benefits are dubious, at best.
Griff
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rs3000

Think about it like this...

If steady state cardio is good for fat loss, how would we have ever survived as a species?

If we burned tons of fat from running and walking fast, how would we have kept from withering away at times when we were being attacked and when food was not readily available.

Cardio is INEFFICIENT for fat loss.
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Cherry

rs3000 wrote:
Think about it like this...

If steady state cardio is good for fat loss, how would we have ever survived as a species?

If we burned tons of fat from running and walking fast, how would we have kept from withering away at times when we were being attacked and when food was not readily available.

Cardio is INEFFICIENT for fat loss.



Thimk about it...

animals in the wild are skinny. If walking or running didn't burn cals they'd all be fat.

:)
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Cherry wrote:
Thimk about it...

animals in the wild are skinny. If walking or running didn't burn cals they'd all be fat.

:)


Cherry, I'm noticing that you love to use animal examples for human functions. Do you realize that most animals have to go DAYS without eating food? Most animals have a slower metabolism than us humans. For better or for worse, we humans have to eat much more often to be functional.

So maybe animals aren't skinny (skinny and lean are two different things) because they exercise. Maybe they're skinny because their caloric intakes are limited.

Even if metabolism isn't applicable here, animals don't walk or run at 60-80% of their MHR for 30-40 minutes. Animals tend to move at short bursts, usually in pursuit of food or to find a quick hiding place to avoid being eaten. So animals would be sprinters more than anything else.
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drm7

Virginia, USA

This is probably the best explanation that I have seen regarding the differences between steady state vs. interval training in terms of fat loss/conditioning.

http://www.alwyncosgrove.com/...m-Training.html
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Cherry

BFBullpup wrote:
Cherry wrote:
Thimk about it...

animals in the wild are skinny. If walking or running didn't burn cals they'd all be fat.

:)

Cherry, I'm noticing that you love to use animal examples for human functions. Do you realize that most animals have to go DAYS without eating food? Most animals have a slower metabolism than us humans. For better or for worse, we humans have to eat much more often to be functional.

So maybe animals aren't skinny (skinny and lean are two different things) because they exercise. Maybe they're skinny because their caloric intakes are limited.

Even if metabolism isn't applicable here, animals don't walk or run at 60-80% of their MHR for 30-40 minutes. Animals tend to move at short bursts, usually in pursuit of food or to find a quick hiding place to avoid being eaten. So animals would be sprinters more than anything else.



My previous comment was with tongue in cheek because it seems many are too often eager to disbelieve scientific fact for vague generalization like reference to what animals do in the wild (especially true regarding nutrition with "evolutionary" speculation)

BTW, most wild animals i've seen on Discovery channel are grazing ALL DAY EVERY DAY. They aren't going days without food.
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Cherry wrote:
My previous comment was with tongue in cheek because it seems many are too often eager to disbelieve scientific fact for vague generalization like reference to what animals do in the wild (especially true regarding nutrition with "evolutionary" speculation)

BTW, most wild animals i've seen on Discovery channel are grazing ALL DAY EVERY DAY. They aren't going days without food.


You're also one of those people, it seems. So you're educating yourself, good. By the way, does this "Discovery Channel" that you speak of show carnivores? You know, animals that don't eat grass all day, every day?
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Cherry

ENERGY EXPENDITURE is burning calories. EE is a function of intensity and duration of the activity. The more "huffing & puffing", heavy breathing, the more cals expended per unit of time.

Hot off the presses:

"Body mass decreased significantly in both groups but more in the low-intensity than the high-intensity
group - 3.3 +/- 1.3 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.9 kg

(kg = ~2.2lbs)

It is easy to operate at ~42% VO2, most my workouts i eatimate to be ~75+%


Int J Sports Med. 2006 Mar;27(3):178-81
Does the intensity of an exercise programme modulate
body composition changes?
Mougios V, Kazaki M, Christoulas K, Ziogas G, Petridou
A.
Laboratory of Sport Hygiene and Nutrition, Department
of Physical Education and Sport Science, Aristotle
University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece.
mougios@phed.auth.gr
Exercise training is a useful component of weight
maintenance programmes. Although energy expenditure,
not intensity or duration, seems to determine the
amount of weight loss attributable to exercise, it is
not clear whether changes in the components of body
mass are also insensitive to these parameters. Thus,
the aim of the present study was to compare the effect
of two isoenergetic exercise training programmes, one
of low and one of high intensity, on body composition.
Fourteen healthy premenopausal untrained women were
divided into two equivalent groups, which exercised on
treadmill at 45 or 72 % of V(O2max) four times a week
for three months, spending 1548 kJ (370 kcal) per
exercise session. No dietary intervention was applied.
Body mass decreased significantly in both groups but
more in the low-intensity than the high-intensity
group (by mean +/- SD, 3.3 +/- 1.3 vs. 1.9 +/- 0.9 kg,
p = 0.032). The decrease in fat mass was significant
in both groups (3.1 +/- 1.2 vs. 2.4 +/- 1.5 kg,
respectively) but not significantly different between
them. Fat-free mass did not change significantly in
either group, although the difference between groups
tended to be significant (decrease by 0.2 +/- 0.7 kg
in the low-intensity group vs. increase by 0.5 +/- 0.6
kg in the high-intensity group, p = 0.058). In
conclusion, exercise training at 45 % of V(O2max)
without dietary restriction produced a higher weight
loss than at 72 % of V(O2max), whereas the higher
intensity tended to maintain fat-free mass, possibly,
in part, through the smaller weight loss. Thus, both
programmes may prove useful in eliciting favourable
changes depending on which target (weight loss or
maintenance of fat-free mass) is of higher priority.
PMID: 16541371


Interesting that this study found more fat burned off with SAME calories expended as high-intensity.
Obviously TIME spent under the exercise was found to be a significant factor in this study even with similar caloric expeniture.
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