MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
What Am I Doing Wrong?
Author
Rating
Options

landparklance

Hi All,

I must be doing something wrong. I can complete the beginner's H.I.T. routine as prescribed in the book.

I can push myself to momentary postive failure for each exercise. However, during the routine my legs and arms get very shakey. It's hard to walk aftr the leg routine!

Here's the real problem: a few minutes after finishing the entire routine I start to hyperventalate. The symptoms increase to the point of nausea, tingling in my hands and face and extreme weakness.

I'm 46 6'1" 173 in good general health. My pulse rate during the exercises raises to 130 to 135.

Any thoughts or suggestions?

Lance
Sacramento, CA
Open User Options Menu

TheSofaKing

Manitoba, CAN

landparklance wrote:
The symptoms increase to the point of nausea, tingling in my hands and face and extreme weakness.


Here's my off the wall advice. See a doctor. Nausea isn't that uncommon, but tingling hands and extreme weakness sound a little ominous.



Open User Options Menu

noone

New York, USA

You aren't doing anything wrong. It will take a few weeks to get your conditioning to improve. Training properly, you will get to a point where the routines become tolerable. This break-in period will seperate the men from the boys. Stick with it.

Bret
Open User Options Menu

landparklance

Thanks for answering. I appreciate the help.

So, you think I'm just hitting it too hard for a beginner? Do I need to do something different for a warm-up or cool down?

Should I rest more than 60 secs inbetween exercises, or do a lesser number of exercises?

Is is possible I'm not breathing correctly when doing the lifts?

Lance
Open User Options Menu

Yes

I often get nauseus and feel weak after a workout, but I have never experienced any tingling. Could be a good idea to see a doctor.

Nausea can come from not eating enough, or eating too much too soon before workout. It could also be dehydration, or too much water.

I would suggest eating about 2hrs before workout. When training, put a pinch of salt in your water to help your muscles absorb it. And dont fill your stomach with water, that could cause nausea and... well, it goes fast when the water decides not to stay there.

Otherwise it just sounds like youre training hard. The shaking is probably because your nervous system is not used to this kind of exercise, and it should be hard to walk after working your legs(I usually look like a sailor whos "dropped the soap" in a prison shower, when trying to walk after squatting ;-) ).
Open User Options Menu

landparklance

Hi Yes, Bret C, and Sofaking,

I much appreciate your inputs. A little more about me. I DO eat at least an hour and a half before exercise as I'm aware that I am a bit hypogycemic. I'm currently drinking about a gallon of water a day.

I can push myself to postive failure on each exercise. After working legs, which I do first, I can barely stand-up!

I was so wiped out last time that I felt I was too weak to walk to my car in the parking lot let alone drive back to the office.

I had to call my secreary to come pick me up! Even the cell phone felt heavy when I was holding it. I was much better after an hour or so of resting at my office, but exhausted the rest of the day.

The big trouble starts a few minutes AFTER finishing the work-out. That's when I start to feel adrenalin and over-breath.

Maybe the exertion of going to failure before I'm conditoned to it is causing a very high release of adrenalin which in turn may cause me to over-breath. I understand high levels of adremalin will cause a steep drop in blood sugar level.

Lance
Sacramento, CA
Open User Options Menu

simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Lance,

You aren't holding your breath during the reps are you? If so, please stop immediately.

I know holding your breath through the "point of exertion" is often taught in other weightlifting regimens. The problem is that these are usually much faster reps.

Holding your breath for half of a 6 to 8-second rep is very dangerous. It will raise your BP to extremely high levels and could very well be responsible for the hyperventilation response you're having after the workout.

Also how soon before your workout are you eating? After eating breakfast, I have to wait at least 2.5 hours until I workout or I don't feel right and get winded more easily. I think it has something to do with the distribution of blood to my digestive tract.

Regards,
Scott
Open User Options Menu

noone

New York, USA

Yes wrote:
Nausea can come from not eating enough, or eating too much too soon before workout. It could also be dehydration, or too much water.

I would suggest eating about 2hrs before workout.


Oddly, I had similar symptoms today. I have the day off from work, so I decided to lift in the morning. I never lift in the morning, only night. Well today, I only ate a bowl of cereal before lifting and my blood suger level dropped quickly after the workout.

I had nausuea, tingling hands also and my sight was way off for a minutes or so. I came home and laid down. I drank some OJ, had some grapes and potato chips. I feel fine now.

I definately need to lift at night so I have plenty of calories in my system to get my through the workout.

Bret

Open User Options Menu

AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Sure sounds like a nasty stress reflex, you should take the time to run it past your doctor in detail. If you were rushing from exercise to exercise (using very heavy loads) it isn't that uncommon at first but your description in general sounds way off to me.

I'd bet you are using way to much of your entire body to complete your reps especially the last few. Try to relax the muscles you aren't targeting per exercise. As in, during leg extension just use your quads not your abs, arms, back glutes etc.

The only time I have seen your type of reaction is when the trainee is trying so hard to go to complete failure they bring in a lot more than the targeted muscles and in the end their whole body is systematically wiped out.

Regards,
Andrew
Open User Options Menu

saseme

simon-hecubus wrote:
Lance,

You aren't holding your breath during the reps are you? If so, please stop immediately.



I like to measure my cadence by my breathing, that is my eccentric phase takes as long as it takes me to take a full, deep breath and then the concentric phase takes as long as it takes for me to exhale that drawn breath with smooth turn arounds.

That way I'm constantly breathing and I don't have to time my cadence, but it's obviously slow enough to avoid injury, but not painfully superslow<@;)>(that's clown hat, curly hair, winking and smiling with a goatee.)

Open User Options Menu
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy