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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

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Interview With Jack LaLanne
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Cherry

An interesting interview, his thoughts on nutrition, longevity and exercise. Jack Is a real phenomenon still going strong @92!

http://www.shareguide.com/LaLa...

Jack on Exercise:

"That's it. Then you build muscle and you build strength. Then for say 30 days I'll cut the weight down a bit and do fifteen reps. Then maybe for 30 days I'll add weight and do only 5 or 6 reps, then for another 30 days I'll do everything really slow. Try that sometimes. Like you are doing a prayer. Eight counts to bring it up and eight counts to let it down. That is very hard, I'll tell you! Then I'd do everything for a while real fast. You aren't used to any of this so the body responds."

Jack on aerobic exercise:



"Twelve to seventeen minutes is plenty on the treadmill--if it's done fast. That's all you need for cardiovascular benefit. You don't need to spend that extra time unless you are over weight and you need to burn off extra calories."



Jack on nutrition:

Share Guide: In your book you mention that you were a vegetarian at one point for 6 years.

Jack LaLanne: I was a strict vegetarian. Then I decided to enter a Mr. America contest (which I won) and in those days they thought that in order to build muscle you had to have meat. So I ate meat for a while.

Share Guide: Why did you stop being a strict vegetarian?

Jack LaLanne: In those days everybody was saying that you had to eat meat to build muscle, so I went on a meat thing for awhile. NowI only eat fish--no chicken, no turkey, just fish. I get all my protein from fish and egg whites.

Share Guide: That is what my favorite healing authority says, Dr. Andrew Weil. He believes in eating fish and dairy on top of the vegetarian diet--the vegaquarian diet.

Jack LaLanne: I use no milk of any kind. Anything that comes from a cow I don't eat.

Share Guide: You aren't eating nonfat yogurt with your fruit anymore?

Jack LaLanne: I may take one bite. Or a little skim milk once in a while is not going to hurt you. It isn't what you do once in a while that's a problem; it's what you do all the time. Look at the average American diet: ice cream, butter, cheese, whole milk, all this fat. People don't realize how much of this stuff you get by the end of the day. High blood pressure is from all this high-fat eating. Do you know how many calories are in butter and cheese and ice cream? Would you get your dog up in the morning for a cup of coffee and a donut? Probably millions of Americans got up this morning with a cup of coffee, a cigarette and a donut. No wonder they are sick and fouled up.



Jack on diet:

" It's not sit-ups, it's everything! In fact, if you've got a big gut and you start doing sit-ups, you are going to get bigger because you build up the muscle. You've got to get rid of that fat! How do you get rid of fat? By changing your diet. You can't get rid of it with exercise alone. You can do the most vigorous exercise and only burn up 300 calories in an hour."

There's more laughs and insights in the interview.

Go Jack!

:)
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Thanks, Cherry. The man is AMAZING. He advocates intense workouts every other day, do weights instead of cardio if you're going to do cardio half-assed, and said cigar-smoking George Burns lived to 100 because he loved life. Definitely a good read.
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karma50

Cherry,

His advice on volume; 20 sets for a bodypart, etc. 10s rest between sets? (that part is good)
Sounds like aerobics to me.
Griff
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Crotalus

Thinking way back, I have to say that Jack LaLane was what sparked my interets in muscle. In between the Three Stooges and some cartoon shows, he'd have an exercise show for women.

He wore some silly looking jump suit but it showed off his impressive arms and that's what got me ... just bending an arm while reading a letter his biceps looked like they'd split his shirt.

Many years later in my teens I saw a picture of him in Stength and Health and he looked fantastic. Then many years after that, I'd see him on the news doing something incredible on each of his birthdays ; like pulling a boat with his teeth while swimming, LOL.

This guy never quits ... just incredible. THANKS for posting the link to the full interview, I really enjoyed it.

But like it was mentioned ... what's with the twenty sets ??? LOL
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Cherry

karma50 wrote:
Cherry,

His advice on volume; 20 sets for a bodypart, etc. 10s rest between sets? (that part is good)
Sounds like aerobics to me.
Griff


He says go to failure on each set and vary the rep scheme every month so i suspect he speaking very general terms here about his workouts. Obviously he advocates more than one set and more than one exercise but he probably stops the set as soon as he can't get another rep. No straining or extended set schemes.
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Tom71

Jack's always interesting.

If memory serves, I believe Arnold credits Jack with being one of the reasons he got into strength training. Or something like that...
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Tom71

"I don't care how old I live; I just want to be LIVING while I am living!"

Good quote, sound advice.

On the other hand, I wonder what Jack would say about the role of genetics with respect to his success. Or his opinion on 2 to 3 whole body routines per week, let alone one set lifting.

Actually, I think I know.

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kurtvf

Tom71 wrote:
Jack's always interesting.

If memory serves, I believe Arnold credits Jack with being one of the reasons he got into strength training. Or something like that...


I think Jack once challanged Arnie to a push up contest in the late 60's and Arnold wisely declined.

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Crotalus

Yeah, push ups were another of Jack's things ...

When a guest on talk shows he'd ofetn demonstrate how he did them where he would have his hands not by his shoulders but stretched out over his head , arms fully extended and doing them on his finger tips.

I always wanted to work on being able to do those but never did. Maybe this thread will motivate me to start working into them.

Anyone here familiar with those 'LaLane Pushups' and can do them ?
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HamsFitness

Crotalus wrote:
Yeah, push ups were another of Jack's things ...

When a guest on talk shows he'd ofetn demonstrate how he did them where he would have his hands not by his shoulders but stretched out over his head , arms fully extended and doing them on his finger tips.

I always wanted to work on being able to do those but never did. Maybe this thread will motivate me to start working into them.

Anyone here familiar with those 'LaLane Pushups' and can do them ?



I think i know what you are talking about and I kno them as bruce lee push ups - try a google ont hem - i have seen a few vids of them around
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davise

The human body is quite capable of more than we think.

I just had some pool installers install a pool in my backyard. One was 54, one was 60 and one was early 40's. They completed it in 14 hours on a hot summer day. I look fitter than them, but I could not have done what they did. The hardest worker was the 60 year old.

I had a roof installed last summer. 3,000 sq ft house with lots of dormers. The hardest worker was about 55 (gray hair and beard). 12 hour days minimum to get this done so they could do the next one. I could not have done this job.

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Cherry

davise wrote:
The human body is quite capable of more than we think.

I just had some pool installers install a pool in my backyard. One was 54, one was 60 and one was early 40's. They completed it in 14 hours on a hot summer day. I look fitter than them, but I could not have done what they did. The hardest worker was the 60 year old.

I had a roof installed last summer. 3,000 sq ft house with lots of dormers. The hardest worker was about 55 (gray hair and beard). 12 hour days minimum to get this done so they could do the next one. I could not have done this job.




this is kind of fitness i prefer!real world fitness over pretty-boy fitness

:)
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karma50

Guys,
At 54 I did 6 mos of construction labor work with a small company owned by a friend. He needed roofing and digging work and was desperate.I was just retired and didn't mind the work. I worked about 9 hrs. a day, with varying levels of intensity. (digging ditches, carrying mortar, pouring concrete, roofing)I worked 4-5 days a week. My friend was freked out thet I did so well.

I did not stop training, but my frequency was reduced. I did not gain any mass, but got leaner. I did not gain any great strength, but I'm fairly strong for my size anyway. My friend and the other laborors in spite of hard work were all overweight. They worked 6 days a week and ate like horses. I continued my normal diet, which is just eating somewhat mindfully, despite the the extra work. IOW, I got leaner (5 libs or so) but not really a lot stronger. I worked contruction for 8 years in my 20's also.

Contruction workers are not any more "functional" than most of the MA guys and strength trainers I worked with over the years, and they usually are overweight at a young age. There are notable exceptions, of course.

The toughest physical work I have ever done was loading and unhloading trucks at a big warehouse, and humping a heavy load as a Marine grunt/radioman at 19.

I did not get any bigger from any of these activities. In fact, I usually lost weight. I don't think the human body, mine anyway, wants to get bigger from hard work. It wants efficiency. This is why I think the "eat big, lift big" lifestyle goes against the body's desired equilibrium, and takes a special lifestyle to maintain, along with freaky genetics. I like "stay lean and strong and efficient."
Griff
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Cherry wrote:
davise wrote:
The human body is quite capable of more than we think.

I just had some pool installers install a pool in my backyard. One was 54, one was 60 and one was early 40's. They completed it in 14 hours on a hot summer day. I look fitter than them, but I could not have done what they did. The hardest worker was the 60 year old.

I had a roof installed last summer. 3,000 sq ft house with lots of dormers. The hardest worker was about 55 (gray hair and beard). 12 hour days minimum to get this done so they could do the next one. I could not have done this job.




this is kind of fitness i prefer!real world fitness over pretty-boy fitness

:)


Malarkey! - what this is about is finely honed skill, it comes with earnest practice and comes with age. Skill that is, at preserving energy.

This the same thing we saw when in his forties George Foreman could hold his own easily with big boys in their twenties. That in a sport that requires extreme conditioning in the form of strength, speed and endurance not to mention durability in withstanding the blows.

Human energetics is an amazing subject.

Regards,
Andrew

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davise

During summers off in college I worked in a Christmas warehouse and this is another strange example. We had a timecard and got four 15 minute breaks a day plus a 35 minute lunch. An 18 wheeler would pull up with boxes of varying weight and our job would be to unload it. A 45 year old guy who constantly reeked of bourbon and had a cigar hanging out of his mouth most of the time would throw (hurl) boxes at me and I would catch them and load them on a pallet so we could could transport them to another part of the warehouse. These were 12 hour days. I was 20 and in awesome physical condition.

At the college I did have access to a nautilus circuit and was doing the 12 set three times a week rush training plus running three miles three times a week and doing martial arts training on top of that. This guy with a fat gut was working me into the ground. He was throwing heavy boxes at me so fast I couldn't keep up..."come on college boy whats the #### is wrong with you...are you on the rag or something" I didn't see how this was possible.

Another time a friend of mine who was a professional mover agreed to help me move my belongings to another house in order for him to make a little cash on the side and me to save a little on moving expenses. I towered over him in size and gym strength and endurance. I literally couldn't keep up.

A friend of mine who's a construction worker and his Dad who was 58 at the time were reroofing his Dads roof. His older brother who is an amateur bodybuilder was helping them out. He would literally have to take breaks out of the sun and drink ice water while the other two kept working. In all fairness he was an office worker and not used to the heat. They were life long blue collar workers....I still remember pulling up and seeing his brother sitting in shade drinking water while the Dad was climbing the ladder with a Marlboro hanging out his mouth and a pack of shingles slung over his shoulder.

Another summer I worked with an old retired Gunny Seargeant who did nothing but drink beer all day in the hot sun and he worked like a maniac.

Some of these old geezers from that generation are just damn tough.
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marcrph

Portugal

karma50 wrote:

I did not get any bigger from any of these activities. In fact, I usually lost weight. I don't think the human body, mine anyway, wants to get bigger from hard work. It wants efficiency. This is why I think the "eat big, lift big" lifestyle goes against the body's desired equilibrium, and takes a special lifestyle to maintain, along with freaky genetics. I like "stay lean and strong and efficient."
Griff


Griff,

You bring up an issue that has been avoided by bodybuilders for a long time. Namely, putting on an abnormal quantity of body mass, even though it may be muscle, that requires a "special lifestyle." The body will quickly get rid of this abnormal mass, as soon as this "special lifestyle" is discontinued. A question arises, is bodybuilding abnormal mass worthwhile? Arthur Jones addressed this issue in his famous Bullentins. This issue has largely been ignored on this forum. Thanks for bringing this issue up in such a appropiate way.

Marc

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Crotalus

davise ;

Yeah, I know ... I've seen all that before over the years myself. Some of these guys I worked with over the years should have been dead for the way they lived their lives drinking, smoking and eating junk everyday yet I've seen them embarass younger, 'in shape' guys by working them right into the ground.

At times when working with these guys I really had to go all out and really put up a front so they didn't see they were about to do it to me too. So many times at quitting time I'd have the look on my face that Ali did when Frazier couldn't answer the bell for the 15th round in the 'Thrilla in Manilla'; that " Thank GOD!! " look.

Of course, I didn't let them see it ... from me they'd hear, " What? Quitting time already ? We didn't get shit done today ... ! Look guys, no fucking around tomarrow ... " LOL

Just a month ago I had a couple guys put a new roof on my place. For the good price they gave me I offered to keep the cooler filled with drinks, buy the lunches, pay them cash and carry all the shingles up onto the roof and to where they needed them.

At 54 I made out fine doing it but not as well as they think I did, LOL. They couldn't believe I'm 54 ... they thought I was in my 40's like them. I think the secret is shaving my head so you don't see the grey hair :>)

But it's a month later and my lower back still isn't the same. It didn't bother me a bit while actually doing the shingle hauling but I've been pretty slow and stiff at getting up out of a sitting position ever since, LOL.
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davise

Looking back at my experiences at boot camp I can also say you can't judge a book by its cover. Some of the biggest most muscular guys would cower or give in under undue physical stress and the lean wiry guys seemed to rule the day. This wasn't always for every single case, but it seemed to be the average.

I think for the kind of activities we were doing they were exceptionally hard on me because of my size. The guys who did well were freaky strong for their size, but not exceptionally muscular. Obstacle courses, running with packs on while firing a weapon etc. A bodybuilding body doesn't seem well suited for this kind of activity. Special lifestyle is a good point Marc.
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ryansergent

Kansas, USA

Fellas,
I know what your're talking about. My younger brother looks like my twin( minus the crows feet) but weighs about 30 more lbs than Yours truely. He's never been inside a gym or touched a barbell but I observed him dry walling a ceiling the other day.

He pins the sheet rock to the ceiling with one hand and screws the damn thing in with the other. Most contractors rely on a dry wall jack for this. When I got my Captains of crush #1 in the mail he closed it about 15 times in the blink of an eye with a bored, distracted, I don't even care mannerism.

Ashort, You're from Canada, a socialist country, and have no Idea what hard work is. You and I both know a large majority of your country men Do nothing but wait around for the gov. checks to come in and pretend to look for a job. Some times, after a long nap, A canadian will attempt a Jrep or Two...That I give you.

Ryan
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saseme

AShortt wrote:
Cherry wrote:
davise wrote:
The human body is quite capable of more than we think.

I just had some pool installers install a pool in my backyard. One was 54, one was 60 and one was early 40's. They completed it in 14 hours on a hot summer day. I look fitter than them, but I could not have done what they did. The hardest worker was the 60 year old.

I had a roof installed last summer. 3,000 sq ft house with lots of dormers. The hardest worker was about 55 (gray hair and beard). 12 hour days minimum to get this done so they could do the next one. I could not have done this job.




this is kind of fitness i prefer!real world fitness over pretty-boy fitness

:)

Malarkey! - what this is about is finely honed skill, it comes with earnest practice and comes with age. Skill that is, at preserving energy.

This the same thing we saw when in his forties George Foreman could hold his own easily with big boys in their twenties. That in a sport that requires extreme conditioning in the form of strength, speed and endurance not to mention durability in withstanding the blows.

Human energetics is an amazing subject.

Regards,
Andrew



Pure bunk and bolder-dash. It's all psycholgical I tell you.
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Paul25

Quote

That is the very minimum. I do 20 sets for deltoids, 20 sets for pecs, and 20 sets for lats. It's important to change things around. Maybe for 30 days I might do ten reps with high weight, but the tenth rep should be to failure.

20 sets for each muslce group????????????????

Paul
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Some people are just better suited (genetics) for certain forms of manual work. Mix that with years of practice and the difference in performance is astounding to the untrained eye.

Over the years with my smallish frame and big mouth I have been challenged to plenty of rounds in the boxing ring. All sorts of tough guys from all sorts of arts have jumped in with me. Some were better than others but one fact always remained. In the ring they just couldn't hack it. Sure most got in some good shots but nothing I didn't shake off in a few seconds behind some stiff jabs. I have shared blows with fellows bigger, stronger and faster than I with years more M.A. experience. In the ring under set conditions they often could barely land a decent blow. Furthermore most of the time they couldn't get out of the way of one and the accumulation of solid shots wore them down every time.

The thing is, it was all performance (skill) I am an average hitter at best but out of their specific niche these guys couldn't compete. They all thought they could punch and kick hard and fast with plenty of accuracy as well as endurance. On my turf though they appeared very one dimensional.

Now on the other hand I have sparred with lots of average size even little guys with talent and skill who knocked me around like one of those blow up kids things that are weighted in the bottom. Some would just toy with me with head shots then literally stop me in my tracks on the ropes with a single body shot.

It is all just talent and skill when considering sporting events, and work like that of a framer, roofer, taper/drywall etc.

Regards,
Andrew

Ryan, please don't remind me of the semi communist state I live in ;^) Got to admit though the new conservative gov. here is shaping up half decent.
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Crotalus

I know .... 20 sets each group ... I do 21 sets a week! I guess Jack would bitch slap me if he caught me leaving after my 22 minutes, LOL.

After doing low volume for so long, I can't even concentrate on a third set of the same exercise. I've tried to change things and try the 5 X 5 routines a couple of times but was too bored by the third set of the same exercise to continue.

20 sets each muscle group ... :>O !!
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ryansergent

Kansas, USA

AShortt wrote:
Some people are just better suited (genetics) for certain forms of manual work. Mix that with years of practice and the difference in performance is astounding to the untrained eye.

Over the years with my smallish frame and big mouth I have been challenged to plenty of rounds in the boxing ring. All sorts of tough guys from all sorts of arts have jumped in with me. Some were better than others but one fact always remained. In the ring they just couldn't hack it.

Sure most got in some good shots but nothing I didn't shake off in a few seconds behind some stiff jabs. I have shared blows with fellows bigger, stronger and faster than I with years more M.A. experience. In the ring under set conditions they often could barely land a decent blow. Furthermore most of the time they couldn't get out of the way of one and the accumulation of solid shots wore them down every time.

The thing is, it was all performance (skill) I am an average hitter at best but out of their specific niche these guys couldn't compete. They all thought they could punch and kick hard and fast with plenty of accuracy as well as endurance. On my turf though they appeared very one dimensional.

Now on the other hand I have sparred with lots of average size even little guys with talent and skill who knocked me around like one of those blow up kids things that are weighted in the bottom. Some would just toy with me with head shots then literally stop me in my tracks on the ropes with a single body shot.

It is all just talent and skill when considering sporting events, and work like that of a framer, roofer, taper/drywall etc.

Regards,
Andrew

Ryan, please don't remind me of the semi communist state I live in ;^) Got to admit though the new conservative gov. here is shaping up half decent.


Jeez Andrew, I was picking a fight and you disarmed me quite nicely. What's a guy gotta do to get your goat? ;)

Ryan

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