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Chris Madaera
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Keelan Parham
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Bob Marchesello
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Jeff Turner
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Weight Training and Cartilage
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HeavyHitter32

What kind of effect does weight training have on cartilage? I know cartilage is one of those tissues that breaks down over time from usage and doesn't "repair" itself so much like other body tissues (unless medical treatment is done for replacement purposes).

However, I've wondered lately if heavy training - even with proper form and slow rep speeds - speeds up the deterioration process of cartilage.
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HeavyHitter32

I've been experiencing some light discomfort in both knees the last couple of months.

Also, if I'm sitting in a chair and I extend my legs, there is a slight popping or grinding in my knee.
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cmg

I would think it has to. Your hips, shoulders and knees being taking the worst of it. Since many of us are older and have been doing this for some time (I'm 40) this is long time usage.

I personally feel it in my shoulders the most.

Regards,

Ron
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NewYorker

New York, USA

Before you curtail your weight training:
Glucosamine Chondroitin MSM may be worth investigating. I have heard good things about these supplements.
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kurtvf

I've heard the same thing from the chairman of my university's orthopedic department. He said that was the only thing scientifically proven to reverse cartiledge breakdown.
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Richard Glover

I highly doubt that properly performed weight training would have a negative impact on the body, inclusive of all the connective tissues. It is far more important to use it, than to not.

I would recommend that you go and see a health care physician if you are experiencing discomfort in your knees HeavyHitter. Joint 'popping' is a natural phenomenon, but accompanied with discomfort I would urge you to get it seen to by someone with a medical background.

The supplement thing is another argument altogether!
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
What kind of effect does weight training have on cartilage? I know cartilage is one of those tissues that breaks down over time from usage and doesn't "repair" itself so much like other body tissues (unless medical treatment is done for replacement purposes).

However, I've wondered lately if heavy training - even with proper form and slow rep speeds - speeds up the deterioration process of cartilage.


Contrary to what has been told to many, slower speeds are more damaging to cartilage, than faster.

Friction at slow speeds is more mechanically efficient (and thus causes greater friction, deformation, and damage) than at higher speeds.

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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
I've been experiencing some light discomfort in both knees the last couple of months.

Also, if I'm sitting in a chair and I extend my legs, there is a slight popping or grinding in my knee.


Warm up well with a set of at least 30 reps

Perform the reps a bit faster (but still safely)

Try the MSM/Glucosamine supplements

Ice Your knees immediatly after squats for at least 15 minutes.

Experiment with width of stance, and direction of toes pointing

Place your heels on a 1-2 inch board, or use shoes with a high heel.

Also in the squat, lean forward more, and stick your butt out more to move more loading to the hams and glutes

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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

One more thing,

Double or triple your anti-oxidant intake.

Omega3
Flax Seed Oil
Fish Liver Oil
Vit C
Vit E

This should reduce your imflammation which is thought to be a response to free radical damage.
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