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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Not Training Hard Enough?
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ics1974

Some people here say that most people simply do not train hard enough even though they think they do. Define hard enough?
Please explain in detail what a hard set(s) is really like. Or show us in a video.

Thanks

ICS
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Ellington Darden


"Those who are training hard enough," I've heard Arthur Jones say, "do NOT ask such questions."

Why? Because they are achieving great results.

Ellington
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Now that I'm done throwing up, I'll start uploading that video to the computer for you.
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ics1974

Drew Baye wrote:
Now that I'm done throwing up, I'll start uploading that video to the computer for you.


Thanks for the sarcasm Drew. I guess you can't answer the question can you.

If Dr. Darden's above statement is true then I guess I am not training hard enough when doing H.I.T. So if doing 8-10 sets to failure is not hard enough how should I change this to be harder.

More sets, set extenders, never doing NTF again? This is a real question I think many people ask when they are trying hard and getting minimal results. Then someone says it's not working because you didn't train hard enough.

All I am asking is to explain what you mean and show us how to do better.

Thanks

ICS
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

ics wrote:

Thanks for the sarcasm Drew. I guess you can't answer the question can you.

ICS


I wasn't being sarcastic. We just filmed the workout, then I threw up. I'll put up a link as soon as it's uploaded.
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Ellington Darden

ICS,

The answer, at least in my opinion, is a combination of intensity and form . . . and knowing how to apply each one. Certainly you can have one without the other, but the key is having both.

One successful technique in training three times per week is having an A and B routine, each one consisting of 8-9 different exercises (or perhaps even A, B, and C routines). We've talked about this previously on this forum in other threads . . . and I cover these concepts in the new book.

Ellington

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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

I signed up for a youtube.com account to upload the file there, but it says the maximum file length is 10 min, and this one is a bit longer. The workout is only 10:05, but there is a few minute intro. I'm uploading to baye.com now. It's about 20MB, so it's going to take a little while. When it's completely uploaded, it will be at http://www.baye.com/...t_hard_work.wmv

We've got a pretty fast internet connection here at work, but you might want to wait another 5 to 10 min to check it (about 2:40 EST).
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kurtvf

Ellington Darden wrote:

"Those who are training hard enough," I've heard Arthur Jones say, "do NOT ask such questions."

Why? Because they are achieving great results.

Ellington


But according to many on this forum if you are not achieving great results it is because you have "bad genetics".

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kurtvf

Ellington Darden wrote:

"Those who are training hard enough," I've heard Arthur Jones say, "do NOT ask such questions."

Why? Because they are achieving great results.

Ellington


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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

For some reason, only the first half of the video exported and it cut it off right at the start of the workout portion. I'm re-exporting right now and will upload again. Same link. So if you checked the video and it cuts off right at the start of the leg extension, check back later on. I will post again after it's been properly exported and uploaded.

Sorry about that. Still getting the hang of the new editing software.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

I'm having trouble getting the whole thing to export properly. I have to leave work for a while but will try to get back in either later tonight or tomorrow afternoon and get this thing finished.

Sorry.

If anyone out there has any experience with Pinnacle video editing software, please PM me. Thanks.
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gorlando

Drew Baye wrote:
I signed up for a youtube.com account to upload the file there, but it says the maximum file length is 10 min, and this one is a bit longer. The workout is only 10:05, but there is a few minute intro. I'm uploading to baye.com now. It's about 20MB, so it's going to take a little while. When it's completely uploaded, it will be at http://www.baye.com/...t_hard_work.wmv

We've got a pretty fast internet connection here at work, but you might want to wait another 5 to 10 min to check it (about 2:40 EST).


I only got 6:29 and it stops at the beginning of the workout.
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Growl

This is great Drew,

Let us know immediately when it works. Perhaps Dr. D. could start a video clip thread and give tips on it. No pressure, I'm just happy as hell, that's all.

Jeff
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Richard Glover

Promising start to your video Drew, you really hit the nail on the head. I've not heard much about the mental aspect of training (not looked that hard either, to be honest), but HIT definately is as much mental exertion as physical (if not more). Last year I had a friend and co-worker train me -which was an eye-opener, as the intensity increased dramatically and generally improved the quality of my workouts e.g. form, machine setup etc.

Looking forward to seeing the rest of the video; it does help to see multimedia presentations for motivational factors and of course we might get new ideas from them!

Cheers
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Richard Glover

Having had an experienced HIT friend and instructor train me, I can definately say that training with him was far more superior than training on my own. 'Perceived' failure is subjective. I would be almost sick, and another chap that my friend trained was regularly sick. He would puke midway through the workout, and carry on! Ha ha ha. I never did make that benchmark - not that I'm gauging the intensity on whether I perform a technicolour yawn though! I would most definately be jiggered and collapse afterwards (but still retain consciousness.....just).
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spud

gorlando wrote:
I only got 6:29 and it stops at the beginning of the workout.


Me too. I saw about 1 second of the leg extension and that was it.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

It appears to be a software error with Pinnacle Studio Plus version 10. I searched their online help files, and think I might have found a fix. Will try again. If that doesn't work, I'll just have to upload the whole thing without cutting, which is going to be a bit bigger file.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

I was able to get it to export properly, but the file size is now a bit larger, a little over 50MB. It should be finished uploading by around 11:00 EST tonight (Sat 9/23)

http://www.baye.com/...t_hard_work.wmv
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Growl

It worked, Drew!
Great Job.

Jeff
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Thanks Jeff. Now that I've got this worked out, I'll be able to post more later as time permits.
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SanSooMan

I wanted to see you throw-up!
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

SanSooMan wrote:
I wanted to see you throw-up!


Jon stopped taping after the last exercise. Maybe next time.
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gmw5

New Zealand

Thanks for that Drew,

Thats great of you to show that video. That is very similar to how I train. However it does illustrate that a good training facility is needed to train well.

I am from New Zealand - and I have yet to see a gym that will support or allow training like that to go ahead. Its very hard to actually be able to move from one exercise to another in quick fashion.
Thanks again - great of you to post that
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henry_bordeaux

Drew,

that was hard work.
but not outright hard work.

maybe with another spotter it could have been outright hard work. but Jon wasn't pushing you very hard.


regards,

Henry


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spud

I would say that I have definitely trained as hard as I can on the leg press, overhead press, seated row, chest press, pulldown, parallel bar dip (both normal and negative negative only) and all isolation exercises.

Exercises where I haven't pushed as hard as Drew does in the video are squat, deadlift, incline dumbbell press, dumbbell pullover and negative chinup.

With squat and bench press, there is obviously the danger of being crushed under the bar, or dropping the dumbbells on your chest or face. Also, because they are free weight exercises, when I get tired my form starts to degrade that little bit too much, and I worry about getting injured.

With the incline dumbbell press my arms started to wobble about that little bit too much at the end of the set and I worried about not having a training partner to take the bells off me if I failed. So I always had to work hard but keep that 1 or 2 final reps in the tank so to speak.

I probably pushed pretty hard in the incline dumbbell press, but with the squat, it exhausts so many muscles, that once you become tired, and you are breathing like a freight train it becomes something of a joke if you attempt to continue past a certain point.

I probably could have kept going a little longer than I did but my hips would have started to rise long before my shoulders - which is not good as it reduces the stress placed on the quadriceps, makes the exercise more of a powerlift instead of a bodybuilding tool. I definitely respect the squat, but I also fear it as I know that when you work it hard, it's just nasty.

The dumbbell pullover was another case of me not wanting to drop a dumbbell on my face, but also, I worried about lowering it into the bottom position at the end of the negative and then not having anybody there to take it off me if I failed and was unable to start the next positive. It would be like stretched on a rack. Either that or I guess I could have dropped the dumbbell but that isn't good gym etiquette.

With the deadlift, I never went all the way to failure as I didn't want my form to degrade to the point where I would pull in an uneven fashion and twist my back or something like that. The best thing was that when deadlifting in this slow, smooth, controlled manner, you also performed the negative. Most other people deadlifting power the bar up as quickly as they can and then simply drop it. They deprive themselves of half a rep every time.

With negative chins I suffered because instead of having a series of solid steps to climb up and get myself into position, I had 2 wooden blocks balanced precariously on top of one another. Instead of climbing to the top position, I had to jump and squirm to get into it, and when you are knackered, have no strength left in your arms and your lungs are burning it's simply too tempting to rest at the bottom when standing on the blocks.

The best set of negative chins that I ever did was when I trained with a friend ad told him that as soon as I got to the bottom of the movement I wanted him to push on my knees and get my straight back to the top. That was horrible. Instead of descending in 10seconds, then resting on the blocks for a bit and then taking 2 or 3 attempts to jump into position, I would keep hold of the bar and be back at the top ready start to he next negative within a second of completing the previous one. That was the one time I experienced the true effectiveness of the exercise.

I would still love to see a video of someone squatting in a power rack and working to failure so that they have to leave the bar at the bottom on the pins. That is probably the most torturous experience you could ever go through in a gym.

The video is great as you actually get to see things like form, rep speed, rep count, minimal rest between exercises, proper breathing, shaking as you reach failure.

I was particularly pleased to see that Drew was panting when the going got tough. Now I don't feel so weird - it's not just me! This workout IS cardio! 8 sets in 10 minutes is very good going.

If I was to compare the training environment on the video with the one that I used to train in, I would say it was just the same as Drew's facility accept for:

1. Every piece of equipment has one person on it at all times - whether they are using it or not.

2. Every piece of equipment has at least one other person queuing for it.

3. There is loud music, people talking and relaxing between there multiple, easy sets, and smirking at you because you train differently. Then you also have the problems of cheap equipment, poorly maintained equipment, no training partner, and the crap layout of the gym where the leg extension is upstairs whilst the leg press is miles away the downstairs somewhere, making it impossible to effectively super set exercises like Drew does in the video.

It's sad and frustrating that there are just too many obstacles and distractions in most commercial gyms which impede proper training like this.

Fantastic video. Well Done.
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