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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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Not Training Hard Enough?
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spud

henry_bordeaux wrote:
that was hard work.
but not outright hard work.

maybe with another spotter it could have been outright hard work. but Jon wasn't pushing you very hard.


How much harder would Drew have worked if either:

a) Jon had been screaming at him the whole time.

"Come on push......push damn it!......Push you f*cking pussy!!! AAARRRGGHH!!!"

or

b) Drew had been screaming in agony when the going got tough.

"AAARRRGGHH!!!! Oh God this hurts!!! Shut it Jon....I AM PUSHING!!!"

This is the problem with the video. Just because there is not blood and vomit flying everywhere and Drew has the discipline to keep quiet and maintain his focus, people think he isn't training as hard as he could be. Listen to his breathing.
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Ellington Darden

In The New Bodybuilding for Old-School Results, Drew Baye wrote chapter 31, which is titled "A Precision Workout Chart: General and Specifics." Here's my challenge to Drew:

How would you accurately record your videoed routine on a workout chart?

One thing we hope to accomplish in last chapter of the new book . . . is to allow trainees the chance to video an exercise correctly and upload it to the DrDarden Web site in a special section, where it would be analyzed and evaluated for INTENSITY and FORM.

Of course, for the evaluation to be meaningful, an exercise must be accurately recorded, not only on video . . . but within a workout chart.

So, I'm very interested in seeing how Drew would record his videoed routine on his workout chart?

Ellington
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henry_bordeaux

spud wrote:
henry_bordeaux wrote:
that was hard work.
but not outright hard work.

maybe with another spotter it could have been outright hard work. but Jon wasn't pushing you very hard.

How much harder would Drew have worked if either:

a) Jon had been screaming at him the whole time.

"Come on push......push damn it!......Push you f*cking pussy!!! AAARRRGGHH!!!"

or

b) Drew had been screaming in agony when the going got tough.

"AAARRRGGHH!!!! Oh God this hurts!!! Shut it Jon....I AM PUSHING!!!"

This is the problem with the video. Just because there is not blood and vomit flying everywhere and Drew has the discipline to keep quiet and maintain his focus, people think he isn't training as hard as he could be. Listen to his breathing.





Spud,

i know that it's hard to present high-intensity on a video.

drew's form is good, and he's moving fast from exercise to exercise, but...
there was no PASSION on this tape, not of Drew, and especially not of the spotter.
I am sure drew will train hard, if pushed properly,it just did not happen on the tape.


and if you believe otherwise, i'll quote the great AJ with the following:

"Watching a man working out properly is almost frightening -- and it is frightening to some people; the intensity of effort is so great that the subject?s entire body is shaking, his face will turn dark red -- or even purple -- and both breathing and heart action will be increased at least one-hundred percent, and frequently far more than that."


watch out for those signs, if you want to see true High-Intensity-Training.



regards,

Henry

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gorlando

henry_bordeaux wrote:
spud wrote:
henry_bordeaux wrote:
that was hard work.
but not outright hard work.

maybe with another spotter it could have been outright hard work. but Jon wasn't pushing you very hard.

How much harder would Drew have worked if either:

a) Jon had been screaming at him the whole time.

"Come on push......push damn it!......Push you f*cking pussy!!! AAARRRGGHH!!!"

or

b) Drew had been screaming in agony when the going got tough.

"AAARRRGGHH!!!! Oh God this hurts!!! Shut it Jon....I AM PUSHING!!!"

This is the problem with the video. Just because there is not blood and vomit flying everywhere and Drew has the discipline to keep quiet and maintain his focus, people think he isn't training as hard as he could be. Listen to his breathing.




Spud,

i know that it's hard to present high-intensity on a video.

drew's form is good, and he's moving fast from exercise to exercise, but...
there was no PASSION on this tape, not of Drew, and especially not of the spotter.
I am sure drew will train hard, if pushed properly,it just did not happen on the tape.


and if you believe otherwise, i'll quote the great AJ with the following:

"Watching a man working out properly is almost frightening -- and it is frightening to some people; the intensity of effort is so great that the subject?s entire body is shaking, his face will turn dark red -- or even purple -- and both breathing and heart action will be increased at least one-hundred percent, and frequently far more than that."


watch out for those signs, if you want to see true High-Intensity-Training.



regards,

Henry



i look forward to seeing your video, Henry.

gary
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spud

I see what you are saying Henry.

Whilst many of us ask the question "How much volume and frequency are necessary to produce results?" perhaps we should also ask "How much intensity is necessary to produce results?"

How far must you take a set before you hit a point of diminishing returns with regards to its effectiveness?

The whole body shake would come from working past concentric failure and continuing to push until isometric failure. Is that what Drew should have done?

Would you like to have seen more grimacing?

We're always told to relax the muscles of the face in neck as straining reduces the effectiveness of the exercise. Do you not do that?

Do you train as hard as AJ describes in every session? I'm surprised you don't bleed from the eyes.

I know that I have trained as hard as Drew does in that video in the past. I know I am capable of reaching that level of intensity. Do I train that hard every session? If I am honest, for whatever reason, the answer is no. Does that make me a wuss? Possibly.

As Drew says at the start of the video, it's really nothing to with the physical side of things.

Everyone's body is capable of intensity, it's whether you have the mental toughness to withstand that level of discomfort. It's mind over matter.

Drew has posted this video knowing that he will probably get some stick off people. I guess you have to either post a video of what you consider to be decent intensity or you just have to leave it be, safe in the knowledge that you train harder than everybody else.

I'm sure everybody on this forum has read more than one theatrical description is what intensity should be like, I know I have. It just gets boring after a while.

I have never vomited during or after a training session. I have however felt sick, been completely breathless and not had the strength to stand. That was after 7 sets.

I couldn't see the point in pushing myself any harder.

It had got to the point where my form was loosening more than I would have liked and each exercise was suffering as far the amount of weight used and number of reps performed was concerned. I probably could have done 1 or 2 more exercises and been sick, but would that have been worth it?
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Wolfie

A quote from vintage Jones, 1969:

"And I'm not joking about this--not even slightly; throughout the entire workout you must constantly walk a very fine line--the line between outright sickness and collapse and simple, but complete, exhaustion, and you must stay just on the far side of that line, constantly on the bare edge of being nauseated".

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Yes

gmw5 wrote:
Thanks for that Drew,

Thats great of you to show that video. That is very similar to how I train. However it does illustrate that a good training facility is needed to train well.

I agree. That is just impossible in a crowded gym with free weigths exercises, when you have to load weights on and off and wait for your turn to use the equipment.

I have managed to solve the problem with other people by training just before the gym is closing, when theres the least amount of people. Still I would need a few more good machines to move really fast between exercises.

One thing I missed in Drew?s gym though, was a some music and noise(thrash metal and people screaming in pain ;-) ).

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ics1974

Drew,

I just watched the video.
Sorry for thinking you were being sarcastic. I appreciate you taking the time to demonstrate and explain "outright hard work". I totally agree without a training partner you may not be able to train as hard. I remember now the intensity of forced reps with a training partner. I currently train alone but now will be looking for a training partner.

Thanks

ICS
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NewYorker

New York, USA

thanks for the video. Definitely helps to see a workout.

Are the shallow breaths at the end of most sets intentional?
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henry_bordeaux

Another quote from vintage Jones, 1971:

". . . have you ever vomited as a result of doing one set of curls?" "Or passed out cold after three or four exercises for your arms?" If not, then you simply don't know what hard training is.





Experience hard work for yourself, then come back and report.




regards,

Henry




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noone

New York, USA

Good job on the video.

Bret
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Cherry

Drew Baye wrote:
I was able to get it to export properly, but the file size is now a bit larger, a little over 50MB. It should be finished uploading by around 11:00 EST tonight (Sat 9/23)

http://www.baye.com/...t_hard_work.wmv


Drew, couple of observations. Your TUL's are way to short. The 'forced reps' at end of each set were seriously lacking. at end of EACH set the helper should apply just enough help to get another rep smoothly and slowly. you were also seen squirming in seat on some exercises to gain leverage on the rep. why don't you do FROM on leg press? those knees should be almost touching the chest. the w/o dint look ALL that 'hard' just my imo, of course. interesting video, thanks. :)
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spud

henry_bordeaux wrote:
Experience hard work for yourself, then come back and report.


So you chunder and pass out after every workout?
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

spud wrote:

With squat and bench press, there is obviously the danger of being crushed under the bar, or dropping the dumbbells on your chest or face. Also, because they are free weight exercises, when I get tired my form starts to degrade that little bit too much, and I worry about getting injured.


If you have good spotters and use a bench with safety catches or if you bench inside a power rack you can safely train all-out. Same with dumbbells, but then you require two good spotters, and excellent communication between the three of you.


spud wrote:
I probably pushed pretty hard in the incline dumbbell press, but with the squat, it exhausts so many muscles, that once you become tired, and you are breathing like a freight train it becomes something of a joke if you attempt to continue past a certain point.


It's entirely possible to push to muscular failure in the squat if you squat inside a power rack and have the safety catches set at the appropriate height. I routinely squatted to failure when training alone in my garage and had no problem.

spud wrote:
I probably could have kept going a little longer than I did but my hips would have started to rise long before my shoulders - which is not good as it reduces the stress placed on the quadriceps, makes the exercise more of a powerlift instead of a bodybuilding tool. I definitely respect the squat, but I also fear it as I know that when you work it hard, it's just nasty.


This can be more of a problem with some people than others, depending on build. Go as hard as you can, and only stop if your form is deteriorating to the point where you feel it may start to be dangerous.


spud wrote:
The dumbbell pullover was another case of me not wanting to drop a dumbbell on my face, but also, I worried about lowering it into the bottom position at the end of the negative and then not having anybody there to take it off me if I failed and was unable to start the next positive. It would be like stretched on a rack. Either that or I guess I could have dropped the dumbbell but that isn't good gym etiquette.


This is why I recommend people train with a partner.


spud wrote:
With negative chins I suffered because instead of having a series of solid steps to climb up and get myself into position, I had 2 wooden blocks balanced precariously on top of one another. Instead of climbing to the top position, I had to jump and squirm to get into it, and when you are knackered, have no strength left in your arms and your lungs are burning it's simply too tempting to rest at the bottom when standing on the blocks.


Depending on the height of the chinning bar, a folding chair, stepladder, or bench might work better. Or if you have spotters who know how to spot during chins (NOT from the ankles) they can help.


spud wrote:
The video is great as you actually get to see things like form, rep speed, rep count, minimal rest between exercises, proper breathing, shaking as you reach failure.


Thanks, but I was doing a few things wrong. I should have kept my head more still, and I should have kept my face more relaxed.


spud wrote:
I was particularly pleased to see that Drew was panting when the going got tough. Now I don't feel so weird - it's not just me! This workout IS cardio! 8 sets in 10 minutes is very good going.


If I start feeling inclined to hold or force my breath, I try to breathe more. A little dizziness from overbreathing is better than getting a headache or other risks associated with breath-holding.


spud wrote:
If I was to compare the training environment on the video with the one that I used to train in, I would say it was just the same as Drew's facility accept for:

1. Every piece of equipment has one person on it at all times - whether they are using it or not.

2. Every piece of equipment has at least one other person queuing for it.


Sitting on equipment between sets and not letting others work in is very bad manners, but an unfortunate reality of working in a commercial gym. Although not always practical, it's usually best to work out during non-peak hours.



3. There is loud music, people talking and relaxing between there multiple, easy sets, and smirking at you because you train differently. Then you also have the problems of cheap equipment, poorly maintained equipment, no training partner, and the crap layout of the gym where the leg extension is upstairs whilst the leg press is miles away the downstairs somewhere, making it impossible to effectively super set exercises like Drew does in the video.


Most gym owners haven't a clue how to properly organize their gyms for effective training. While waiting for our equipment to arrive, Jon and I worked out at a local LA Fitness. While it was a really nice facility, with new equipment, well maintained, etc., it wasn't laid out efficiently at all. We were running all over the place.

In that kind of atmosphere, you have to just do the best you can if you can't train in off peak hours. You might not be able to rush between machines, but you can make up for it by pushing as hard as possible on the exercises you do.


spud wrote:
It's sad and frustrating that there are just too many obstacles and distractions in most commercial gyms which impede proper training like this.

Fantastic video. Well Done.


Thanks. I wish I had my camera with me a few weeks ago. Josh Trentine was in town and Jim Flanagan put him through a workout at his place that was just brutal. He's coming back in November for a contest in Miami, and we'll try to get some video of him training then. I was considering doing it as well, but as you can see by the video I'm not very lean at the moment. Too many other things to worry about right now. If I can video Josh working out I'll post that as well.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

ics wrote:
Drew,

I just watched the video.
Sorry for thinking you were being sarcastic.


No problem at all. I'm sorry if it came across that way. It wasn't my intent to sound sarcastic. It was just meant as a hint towards the intensity of the video to come.

ics wrote:
I appreciate you taking the time to demonstrate and explain "outright hard work". I totally agree without a training partner you may not be able to train as hard. I remember now the intensity of forced reps with a training partner. I currently train alone but now will be looking for a training partner.

Thanks

ICS


A good training partner makes all the difference in the world. I don't know anyone who pushes as hard by themselves as they do when someone else is there pushing them.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

NewYorker wrote:
thanks for the video. Definitely helps to see a workout.

Are the shallow breaths at the end of most sets intentional?


I try to breathe faster towards the end of the set to fight the urge to hold my breath or val salva if I start to feel it. People have a tendency to hold or force their breath when contracting hard, but this should be avoided during exercise.
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henry_bordeaux

spud wrote:
henry_bordeaux wrote:
Experience hard work for yourself, then come back and report.

So you chunder and pass out after every workout?





Spud,


As Dr. Darden and a lot of others have written, passing out may happen during your initial HIT workouts, but then the body adapts. and your overall condition improves.








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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

BretC wrote:
Good job on the video.

Bret


Thanks Bret
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henry_bordeaux

A nice dr.ken story about hard training with AJ:


"One of the things about training hard is that talking or writing about it doesn't really explain it or convey it. Even watching it on tape or in person doesn't quite get the point across. One has to train hard to understand hard trining and one of the things I learned primarily down there (Lake Helen) as did Jim Bryan (he has the pedigree of training in the 120 degree Quonset Hut at DeLand HS!)was that training hard is a learned skill. The more frequently you practice that skill (train hard) the better you become at it. However, one of my many jobs at a time when everyone in the company lacked titles and did whatever had to be done, was to train or demonstrate a workout, when NFL or college coaches came in to visit and get information re: the equipment. I had the pleasure of training in front of one of the better known staffs.

The day before, Arthur gave me the usual speech about how I had to do a good job training or it would be my ass, etc. In front of the full staff of assistant coaches and famous head coach, I did leg extension and leg press on what was then the new Compound Leg Machine, made the mistake of hopping off of the leg press after doing 42 reps (I had previously barely squeaked out 25 or so thus making my point about learning how to train hard or actually doing so once the proper motivatin-in this case, the fear of Arthur-was applied)and having my knees buckle, sending me toppling over. Then it was POTA (on what was the new Pullover Torso Arm machine, combination pullover followed by supinated grip pulldown), Double Chest, doing just the secondary or decline press movement, db lateral raise supersetted with barbell press (no Double Shoulder on site), Rowing torso machine followed by db row, then dips on what was the new Multi Exercise machine. I dipped with a lot of weight hooked onto me from the weight stack, then did negatives. I fell through the dip bars into the gears with Arthur yelling the entire time.

He unhooked me and I jumped up onto the dip bars, began to do additional dips with bodyweight only and passed out, hitting the floor and rolling backwards into the curl/triceps machine, cracking my head open. I was either out or dazed but was picked up by whomever was helping or watching at the time, and placed into the curl (of the curl/triceps), did a few reps until Arthur disgustingly told me to get out and "do some sprints". We walked out the door of the factory gym onto the dirt road (Ohio Ave was partially paved and toward the far end of the factory, it was unpaved and went into a dirt road) and I began to do what I thought were a series of sprints. I collapsed and found myself alone out there, face down in the dirt.

A youngster of about 12 was watching and said, "what you doing mister?" I replied that I was doing sprints. He said, "That don't look like no sprints to me. You was walking and now you's lying down". That was the point. What I thought were sprints were half-assed shuffles that the coaches laughed at, then left me by myself (not that I noticed) until I again collapsed. I got up, showered, then joined the coaches and Arthur in his office. Arthur immediately went into a great sales pitch, designed to boost my ego. "Look at this guy, he played college football but he's a punk. He's puny. 165 pounds, all muscle but look at him, your guys would eat him up, he's nothing." One of the coaches said something along the lines of not ever having seen anyone train as hard as I did.

As I thanked him for the compliment, Arthur interrupted by saying, "Yeah, he's ***, now imagine one of your animals training like that, a guy 225 who puts on 30 pounds of muscle in the off season. You'ld have an unbelievable specimen, not someone like Ken."
This was typical in that those of us down there who served as guinea pigs always trained very hard. Those of us lucky enough to have Arthur stand over us (which he did with increasing infrequency as we got busier) really trained hard all the time. Some of us were just nuts and obssessed and could push the limit all the time.

I think everyone on the board knows the story of me getting catapulted out of the experimental squat machine onto the concrete of the factory floor and Arthur's only comment was that he thought the machine needed a restraining belt. In either case, this was typical of our training and very much what my guys do today although my oldtimers and children often comment that with age, I have gotten soft on the younger generation."

Dr. Ken
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Cherry wrote:

Drew, couple of observations. Your TUL's are way to short.


I try to keep my TULs between 40 and 60 seconds. I haven't done pre-exhaust on some of these exercises for a while, and misjudged the amount of weight I could handle on a few of the compound movements. Just goes to show how much the simple (rotary) movements inroad the target muscles.


Cherry wrote:
The 'forced reps' at end of each set were seriously lacking. at end of EACH set the helper should apply just enough help to get another rep smoothly and slowly.


We were moving smoothly and slowly enough. It wasn't supposed to be SuperSlow. The forced rep on the leg press was as slow as any other rep I did on that exercise. Same on the compound row.

We weren't doing forced reps on the incline press, we were doing negative-only.

I can use the entire stack on that machine for multiple-reps without pre-exhaust, so I figured with pre-exhaust 180 should work just fine. It was too much after the chest flies. I dropped it to 140 figuring that would be doable, but when it wasn't, I didn't want to waste time switching weights again, so I figured we'd just finish the set negative-only so I could keep going without any more rest.


Cherry wrote:
you were also seen squirming in seat on some exercises to gain leverage on the rep.


At no point during the workout did I "squirm" to gain leverage. I adjusted my position on the compound row because I started out seated too far forward.


Cherry wrote:
why don't you do FROM on leg press? those knees should be almost touching the chest. the w/o dint look ALL that 'hard' just my imo, of course. interesting video, thanks. :)


How close the knees get to the chest depends entirely on the individual and the machine being used. The hips can only flex so far, and after that the lower back starts to flex, and if the spine is flexed the hips tend to rise out of the seat as people push, and then you're pushing from your back, not through your hips. People have been injured doing this. We put people as close to the foot pedal as we can while not compromising safety.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Thanks for the Dr. Ken story Henry, that was great.
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Cherry

Drew Baye wrote:
Cherry wrote:

Drew, couple of observations. Your TUL's are way to short.

I try to keep my TULs between 40 and 60 seconds. I haven't done pre-exhaust on some of these exercises for a while, and misjudged the amount of weight I could handle on a few of the compound movements. Just goes to show how much the simple (rotary) movements inroad the target muscles.


Cherry wrote:
The 'forced reps' at end of each set were seriously lacking. at end of EACH set the helper should apply just enough help to get another rep smoothly and slowly.

We were moving smoothly and slowly enough. It wasn't supposed to be SuperSlow. The forced rep on the leg press was as slow as any other rep I did on that exercise. Same on the compound row.

We weren't doing forced reps on the incline press, we were doing negative-only.

I can use the entire stack on that machine for multiple-reps without pre-exhaust, so I figured with pre-exhaust 180 should work just fine. It was too much after the chest flies. I dropped it to 140 figuring that would be doable, but when it wasn't, I didn't want to waste time switching weights again, so I figured we'd just finish the set negative-only so I could keep going without any more rest.


Cherry wrote:
you were also seen squirming in seat on some exercises to gain leverage on the rep.

At no point during the workout did I "squirm" to gain leverage. I adjusted my position on the compound row because I started out seated too far forward.


Cherry wrote:
why don't you do FROM on leg press? those knees should be almost touching the chest. the w/o dint look ALL that 'hard' just my imo, of course. interesting video, thanks. :)

How close the knees get to the chest depends entirely on the individual and the machine being used. The hips can only flex so far, and after that the lower back starts to flex, and if the spine is flexed the hips tend to rise out of the seat as people push, and then you're pushing from your back, not through your hips. People have been injured doing this. We put people as close to the foot pedal as we can while not compromising safety.



not trying to be overly critical but we are here to learn. (you got stones for posting your WO), but the WO lacked "feel". by feel i mean that the WO didn't look like it would be conducive to muscle growth, lacked that "muscle growth" feel to it. oh yes you went to concentric failure but smthg was lacking. you had no discernable PUMP, a muscle should inflate into a huge ball after the set as an autonomic reaction to fatigue and nourishment.. yours did not.

also, another criticism hopw you don't find it too harsh but your physique is lacking too. for a trainer that devotes his life to this you hardly look like you train at all. (as an interesting example, contrast this with Arthur's progress, obviously he produced noticeable gains) it's about where the rubber meets the road.. your "theory" or training paradigm is not cutting it, imo. is not producing noticeable results..
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gorlando

Cherry wrote:
Drew Baye wrote:
Cherry wrote:

Drew, couple of observations. Your TUL's are way to short.

I try to keep my TULs between 40 and 60 seconds. I haven't done pre-exhaust on some of these exercises for a while, and misjudged the amount of weight I could handle on a few of the compound movements. Just goes to show how much the simple (rotary) movements inroad the target muscles.


Cherry wrote:
The 'forced reps' at end of each set were seriously lacking. at end of EACH set the helper should apply just enough help to get another rep smoothly and slowly.

We were moving smoothly and slowly enough. It wasn't supposed to be SuperSlow. The forced rep on the leg press was as slow as any other rep I did on that exercise. Same on the compound row.

We weren't doing forced reps on the incline press, we were doing negative-only.

I can use the entire stack on that machine for multiple-reps without pre-exhaust, so I figured with pre-exhaust 180 should work just fine. It was too much after the chest flies. I dropped it to 140 figuring that would be doable, but when it wasn't, I didn't want to waste time switching weights again, so I figured we'd just finish the set negative-only so I could keep going without any more rest.


Cherry wrote:
you were also seen squirming in seat on some exercises to gain leverage on the rep.

At no point during the workout did I "squirm" to gain leverage. I adjusted my position on the compound row because I started out seated too far forward.


Cherry wrote:
why don't you do FROM on leg press? those knees should be almost touching the chest. the w/o dint look ALL that 'hard' just my imo, of course. interesting video, thanks. :)

How close the knees get to the chest depends entirely on the individual and the machine being used. The hips can only flex so far, and after that the lower back starts to flex, and if the spine is flexed the hips tend to rise out of the seat as people push, and then you're pushing from your back, not through your hips. People have been injured doing this. We put people as close to the foot pedal as we can while not compromising safety.


not trying to be overly critical but we are here to learn. (you got stones for posting your WO), but the WO lacked "feel". by feel i mean that the WO didn't look like it would be conducive to muscle growth, lacked that "muscle growth" feel to it. oh yes you went to concentric failure but smthg was lacking. you had no discernable PUMP, a muscle should inflate into a huge ball after the set as an autonomic reaction to fatigue and nourishment.. yours did not.

also, another criticism hopw you don't find it too harsh but your physique is lacking too. for a trainer that devotes his life to this you hardly look like you train at all. (as an interesting example, contrast this with Arthur's progress, obviously he produced noticeable gains) it's about where the rubber meets the road.. your "theory" or training paradigm is not cutting it, imo. is not producing noticeable results..


cherry,

where is your picture?

it looks like there's plenty of muscle on drew, just not lean enough, as he said. many people don't get the diet part right. too many addicting and fattening foods out there - too easy to overeat. has nothing to do with training paradigm being wrong.

gary
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spud

Cherry wrote:
the WO lacked "feel". by feel i mean that the WO didn't look like it would be conducive to muscle growth, lacked that "muscle growth" feel to it.


The more I read that paragraph the more I want to see a video of you training.

Cherry wrote:
oh yes you went to concentric failure but smthg was lacking. you had no discernable PUMP, a muscle should inflate into a huge ball after the set as an autonomic reaction to fatigue and nourishment.. yours did not.


What was lacking?

How much pump are you expecting to see? You speak as if someone should triple in size when pumped up.

How they hell do you measure the pump that Drew may or may not have got? You are just watching the video on your PC at home. Were you holding a tape measure up to the screen or something?

Cherry wrote:
your physique is lacking too. for a trainer that devotes his life to this you hardly look like you train at all.


Whilst you free to comment on other people's physiques, you'd gain much more respect if you posted a picture of your own awesome physqiue, instead of just bad mouthing others.
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Richard Glover

Cheers Drew, great video. A couple of questions - do you perform forced reps in every workout? Also, what style of Nautilus equipment are you using?

Dr. Darden - the idea of posting up videos and comments is great! When is your book coming out?
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