MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
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Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
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Jeanenne Darden
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Ted Tucker
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Not Training Hard Enough?
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Richard Glover

How close the knees get to the chest depends entirely on the individual and the machine being used. The hips can only flex so far, and after that the lower back starts to flex, and if the spine is flexed the hips tend to rise out of the seat as people push, and then you're pushing from your back, not through your hips. People have been injured doing this. We put people as close to the foot pedal as we can while not compromising safety.[/quote]

Whilst experimenting on a local gym's leg press trying to get rid of pins and needles I had been experiencing on it in previous sessions I sat too far forward and unfortunately experienced the aforementioned back 'problem' - it was sore for days!
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Richard Glover wrote:
Cheers Drew, great video. A couple of questions - do you perform forced reps in every workout? Also, what style of Nautilus equipment are you using?


Thanks Richard.

If I fall a bit short of 60 seconds I'll usually do one or two forced reps. If I'm more than a little over 60 seconds, I won't.

We're using the Nautilus Nitro equipment. We removed the decals because we think the equipment looks better without them.
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Paul25

Many Thanks for your time for filming the workout and loading it up on this site really appreacite that! It was imformative/helpful and I think most of us can tell how hard we are working now. Shame Cherry couldn't offer any support


Paul
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Wolfie

Thanks for the video Drew. A question about your intro. For those of us training alone, do you recommend a second set to failure? I'm on the floor for a good 15 minutes after a workout as it is.
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

Drew

Thank you for the video. You laid yourself open to tons of critics who would be afraid to show their workouts.

I want to ask you about a few things. Your rep cadence seemed a bit fast, while your lack of any rest between sets seemed to only cause fatigue in a cardio manner. Why didn't you take 30-60 sec rest between sets? You seem to be wanting to build an O2 deficit rather than building the muscle. Is the complete lack of rest necessary to your idea of hard work?

Your choice of exercises, why did you choose them and their order? Any particuliar goal in mind?

Your breathing pattern, the choo, choo effect, do you feel this enhances your endurance rather than a more relaxed pattern?

Again it was a brave thing to do, thanks.

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JJ McClinton

Thanks for posting the video. How does the Nautilus Nitro lower back extension compare to the MEDX?
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kevindill

Maryland, USA

Drew,

Good work out man! My hats off to your for having the b*lls to put that out there like that. I think your point in the mini lecture is well made about the benefit of a coach or partner. Well done sir.

Regards,
Kevin
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
I Here's my challenge to Drew:

How would you accurately record your videoed routine on a workout chart?


Once positive failure is reached, we note the time under load up to that point. If any additional techniques like forced reps or negatives are performed following positive failure, we note it after the TUL on the chart. For example, if I were to reach failure at 50 seconds and then perform two forced reps, it would be recorded as 50+2FR in the space for recording performance. If we did 2 negative only reps instead of forced reps, they'd be recorded as 50+2NO.

Partial reps aren't included in the overall TUL, but are recorded by number after the TUL. If 2 partial reps are performed after failure, they'd be recorded as +2PR

In the case of the incline press where the weight was dropped, we'd record the time at each weight, plus the negatives at the second weight:

180/07, 140/11+5NO

Whether the resistance would be increased for the next workout or not would depend on whether I could hit my target TUL of 60 before achieving concentric failure, not including the additional time spent performing forced reps, forced negatives, etc.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Wolfie wrote:
Thanks for the video Drew. A question about your intro. For those of us training alone, do you recommend a second set to failure? I'm on the floor for a good 15 minutes after a workout as it is.


The vast majority of people will get all they need out of one set to failure per exercise. If you're already on the floor after your workouts, you're training hard enough.
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kata14

Thanks for inspiration. I stay motivated to see that.
Is it possible to see a routine with Free-Weights?
It'll be fabulous.
kata
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

rtestes wrote:

I want to ask you about a few things. Your rep cadence seemed a bit fast, while your lack of any rest between sets seemed to only cause fatigue in a cardio manner.


I was moving slowly enough to maintain a reasonable degree of control during the turnarounds. I don't think there's much benefit to moving much more slowly than that unless you're just learning the exercise or have an injury or condition requiring extra caution.


rtestes wrote:
Why didn't you take 30-60 sec rest between sets? You seem to be wanting to build an O2 deficit rather than building the muscle. Is the complete lack of rest necessary to your idea of hard work?


I believe it may have a beneficial effect on growth hormone production, and it is also far more effective for conditioning, which I feel is also important.


rtestes wrote:
Your choice of exercises, why did you choose them and their order? Any particuliar goal in mind?


The Nautilus Nitro compound machines do not have heavy enough weight stacks. To use the leg press without pre-exhaust we have to add about 30 pounds of add on plates. I've also maxed out our incline press and dip machine. I like performing heavy compound movements, but I prefer to keep my TULs around 60 seconds, so we are using pre-exhaust before doing the compound movements. Eventually I'd love to get the Eccentric Edge compound multi-exercise machine if we can fit it so we don't have to worry about running out of weight.


rtestes wrote:
Your breathing pattern, the choo, choo effect, do you feel this enhances your endurance rather than a more relaxed pattern?


I mainly do that to counter the urge to hold my breath.


rtestes wrote:
Again it was a brave thing to do, thanks.


No problem. I figured I'd get hassle from more than a few people, since a lot of people can't do much other than criticize here, especially considering I'm nowhere near top condition right now. I figured it might help illustrate some of the things I'm talking about at least a little bit, though, so I figured "why not?". The comments from Dr. Ken that Henry posted were right on the money though, as well as Dr. Darden's comments about having to experience it firsthand to really know.

I'll do another one after a few weeks of dieting if people really think it's that big of a deal.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Francois Picaud wrote:
Thanks for posting the video. How does the Nautilus Nitro lower back extension compare to the MEDX?


It's faster to get into and out of, and while it doesn't stabilize the pelvis quite as well, it feels about the same.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

kata14 wrote:
Thanks for inspiration. I stay motivated to see that.
Is it possible to see a routine with Free-Weights?
It'll be fabulous.
kata


We don't have any free weights in our facility except some adjustable dumbbells, and not enough weight to really do any heavy free weight training (just enough plates for the Formulator).
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Law&Order

Unlike certain others,i shall refrain from derogatory remarks - too easy.Though,i will remark upon a few observations.


1. Laboured breathing; unconditioned,or some medical problem that you haven't disclosed?

2. During the row movement the guy assists you perform two negatives,then says *try one more,keep trying,keep trying* - he was referring to FROM,without assistance...... go figure.

3. *beneficial effect on growth hormone*
Gotshalk, L.A., et.al. (1996). Pituitary-gonadal hormonal responses of
multi-set vs. single -set resistance exercise. Journal of Strength and
Conditioning Research. 10(4):286.


For posting that video,i give credit - however,peoples opinion vary with regard to hard work......

----------------
If you want to see hard work on video - Dorian Yates,Blood & Guts
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Tom Traynor

The thing about the Dorian video: No doubt he was working hard--but he was definitely putting on a show for the camera (says a pro bodybuilder I talked to who saw him train off camera back in the day)....There is little reason to grunt/groan/grimace/vocalize during a set--it has nothing to do with doing the muscular work. Grunting/grimacing to lift heavy things is a uneccesary choice.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Law&Order wrote:

If you want to see hard work on video - Dorian Yates,Blood & Guts


I've seen it. It's certainly hard work, but it's also horrible form.
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Law&Order

Tom Traynor wrote:
The thing about the Dorian video: No doubt he was working hard--but he was definitely putting on a show for the camera (says a pro bodybuilder I talked to who saw him train off camera back in the day)


Tell your *friend* from me,that he speaks fabricated *truths*.

Tom Traynor wrote:
There is little reason to grunt/groan/grimace/vocalize during a set--it has nothing to do with doing the muscular work.


Nor does regurgitating ones previous meal - though both have their place when strain is brought into the equation..... Grunting/grimacing is not a necessity to muscle growth,but it does occur when maximum effort is exerted (view Powerlifting,Olympic lifting,WSM).This has always been the case with Yates.....it's no *show*.


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Law&Order

Drew Baye wrote:
Law&Order wrote:

If you want to see hard work on video - Dorian Yates,Blood & Guts


I've seen it. It's certainly hard work, but it's also horrible form.


Can you be more precise? Too slow,too fast,bouncing the load?

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henry_bordeaux

i can't believe that anybody here on this forum believes that Dorian Yates is actually training hard.

not even close.

and together with really bad form

this makes the video nothing more but a joke.

sort of a comedy...






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shlevon

Focusing on the intensity of an individual bout of exercise is exponentially less important than focusing on the progress one is making over time with their intended goals.

For all practical purposes, people should be trying to tremendously increase their strength while eating to actually accrue muscle if they want to actually get more muscular over time. If training until your head explodes accomplishes this, knock yourself out.

But if you're training to the point of passing out and you squat today what you squatted a year ago, your progress probably sucked. Intensity out of context is meaningless.
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Tom Traynor

Where did I say friend--It occured at a seminar that for a contest he was guest posing at.

WHO the Hell ARE you anyways? Do YOU have 30 years experience "in the trenches" and conduct 3500-4000 training sessions per year to glean SOME insight to what needs to happen in a strength training session? Didn't think so, huggy bear...

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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Grunting and groaning aren't necessary, and should be avoided during exercise. That's the reason for the faster breathing - it reduces the tendency to do so. When a client has a tendency to hold their breath, grunt or groan during an exercise, having them focus on breathing more helps prevent it.
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Tom Traynor

If YOU aren't breathing hard after a several sets...then Drew Baye speaks to YOU during his intro prologue. And before you spew: "I have no idea what an unchained training savage you are...", I said IF you aren't breathing hard at the end of the set(s).

HOW do I know?! As stated in previous post: 3,500-4000 coached sessions/yr teaches the teacher SOMETHING.

Re: Grunting, My Ducati WILL pop a wheelie and flip me off, but I choose to "get there" verry quickily without doing so--quicker in fact. Don't need to put on a caveman show...didn't make a peep Saturday when I trap-bar deadlifted 418 lbs. raw off of a 6 1/4 inch handle height for 4 reps. Since you seem to be in love with bodybuilders: Quiet, Louy--like a church (Pumping Iron)....".
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

shlevon wrote:
Focusing on the intensity of an individual bout of exercise is exponentially less important than focusing on the progress one is making over time with their intended goals.


If one is training as intensely as possible and also using an appropriate volume and frequency of training they'll make better progress over time.

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shlevon

Drew Baye wrote:
shlevon wrote:
Focusing on the intensity of an individual bout of exercise is exponentially less important than focusing on the progress one is making over time with their intended goals.

If one is training as intensely as possible and also using an appropriate volume and frequency of training they'll make better progress over time.



Compared to what, and for what intended goal?

Statements like these are meaningless out of context.
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