MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Kim Wood
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eintology

California, USA

At the risk of sounding trite, I just noticed you were posting on this website, and I just wanted to congratulate you on your career.

I'm not in the business of exercise myself, but I am familiar with your resume in professional sports....

You're someone who has fought the good fight, and for whatever it's worth, I just thought you should be acknowledged for it.

Erik
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Ellington Darden

Guys,

I can't begin to describe what Kim Wood's home in Ohio looks like . . . on the inside. But anyone who's interested in strength training could spend a solid year (and I'm not kidding) digging through his collection of magazines, books, and historical items. And that's just the beginning.

His training areas include: most of the original Nautilus machines from the early 1970s, all the early Hammer machines, early York
equipment . . . and at least 50 vintage barbells/dumbbells, some of which are more than a 100 years old.

If you've ever traveled to London and visited the British Museum, then that experience might be close to what it's like to spend several days at Kim's home.

I feel fortunate . . . because I've done both.

Ellington
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Fred F

New Jersey, USA

I haven't had the privilege of visiting Kim's home but have had the opportunity to speak with him on several occasions. I'll never forget my very first conversation with Kim which took place about 2 years ago. It was a very in my face discussion that gave me the essence of who Kim Wood is. Kim has shared a tremendous amount of knowledge with me over the last 2 years and has helped form some of who I am as a teacher in the field of strength and fitness. Kim isn't about the Xs and Os of training he's much deeper than that. He's very passionate about strength and fitness and is a great facilitator of knowledge. The more I talk with Kim the more I get it.

Fred Fornicola
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k38wood

gosh, guys thanks for the nice
words. I'd stopped by Ell's site here
for years...I'd read Ell's stuff but on the whole didn't pay much attention
to much else(too much "machine vs. free-weight" silliness for me). Now with Ell's new book coming out I see
a real opportunity for the real
basics of what is called "high intensity training" to be discussed...
and discussed by people who have
a real knowledge of the subject.

Arthur used to borrow a quote(I think it was from "The Tale of Two Cities")
about these times being the worst of times and these times being the best of times...well, strength training is
stuck in a deep bog these days...it's really sad. But if there can be honest
dialog between reasonable men on the
real basics of strength training that is a very good thing. I think that can
happen here...Thanks, Ell...

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cmg

k38wood wrote:
gosh, guys thanks for the nice
words. I'd stopped by Ell's site here
for years...I'd read Ell's stuff but on the whole didn't pay much attention
to much else(too much "machine vs. free-weight" silliness for me). Now with Ell's new book coming out I see
a real opportunity for the real
basics of what is called "high intensity training" to be discussed...
and discussed by people who have
a real knowledge of the subject.

Arthur used to borrow a quote(I think it was from "The Tale of Two Cities")
about these times being the worst of times and these times being the best of times...well, strength training is
stuck in a deep bog these days...it's really sad. But if there can be honest
dialog between reasonable men on the
real basics of strength training that is a very good thing. I think that can
happen here...Thanks, Ell...




Hello Kim,

I've known of you and read about you in Dr. D's books - however haven't heard of your recommendations. I understand you state "old school" however what would be a good basic muscle building program that you would use? I mean exercises and especially sets.

Regards,

Ron
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k38wood

8-10(or less)basic exercises...
one set to failure(everything "all out")...double progresssive system of
weight progression...two to three days
a week...positive attitude...
metal set of always wanting to improve... eat good food...
live an active life in addition to training... read books...think...
never back down
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JimBryan

Florida, USA

Kim's a funny SOB too. He makes me laugh every time we talk. Training and life can be too serious.
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chaire

North Carolina, USA

Kim,
I have not gotten around to thanking you for lunch at Skyline Chile several years ago. I visited Hammer with Stoney Albert to try out the H-Squat. I enjoyed hearing the stories and the visit to the Bengals weight room. You have done alot for strength coaches over the years, thank you.
Dr. Ken thank you for all you have done. I have enjoyed our conversations this summer.
Dr. Darden thank you for teaching me how to train over 30 years ago. Thank you for the time we spent talking in Indy.
If any of you get a chance to spend time with these gentlemen, do it. They have forgotten more than most of us will ever know.
God Bless,
Charlie


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cmg

Thank you for your training information Kim.

Great stories!

Regards,

Ron
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AI1963

k38wood wrote:
8-10(or less)basic exercises...
one set to failure(everything "all out")...double progresssive system of
weight progression...two to three days
a week...positive attitude...
metal set of always wanting to improve... eat good food...
live an active life in addition to training... read books...think...
never back down


Mr. Wood:

I don't want this to become a thread where you get peppered with "How's this routine?" questioning. I think its not so much the exercises you do - within the guidelines you gave - as much as how you do them.

There is one aspect of training that I respectfully ask that you share your wisdom about: the question of rest between sets. I have tried resting quite a bit between sets as well as "resting" literally seconds between movements (systemic warmup, all apparatus' adjustments and weights preset, moving as rapidly as possible from one station to the next, 8 movements done in just over 8 minutes, starting with a leg curl/leg extension/duo squat. Kicks my ass every time.).

To paraphrase Dr. Ken: everything can work; which to me means as long as one is working hard, ALMOST any program can be productive for a period of time. The latter type of routine unquestionably is more grueling and produces obvious CV benefits as well.

But the $64,000 question to my mind is: in your experience, does that sort of training have any sort of systemic effect that produces superior gains in size/strength? Is there indeed some sort of "metabolic effect" from training with little to no rest between movements that produces superior size/strength gains, again with all considerations of efficiency or CV benefits aside?

Any opinion, anecdotes or insights you could share on this topic would be greatly appreciated. This is of
more fundamental interest to me than the "Should I do chins or machine rows?" kind of exchanges.

Thanks again for the benefit of your
experience. There's more worthwhile infomation to be had on this FREE message board than the entire exercise book and magazine section at Barnes and Noble.

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k38wood

I've always followed what Arthur used to say...you rest long enough between sets to recover enough to give a maximum effort on the next set...
of course, your mental set is "push"...
and as you get in better condition
the duration of that rest interval
decreases.

I've never been a fan of
whipping through a work-out with no rest(and getting sick)...when you first start training hard you certainly might exceed your your
metabolic abilities to recover and you might feel woozie...with time you will extend those metabolic recovery abilities and your system will adjust to the hard training.

You always
push hard...but getting sick isn't a
necessary part of training hard.
And speed-balling through a work-out
isn't necessary either.
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k38wood

and AI1963...FYI, none of this is free
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spud

Don't quote me on this, but I'm fairly sure that not so long ago Dr Darden posted that you should never rest more than 2 minutes between sets.

If you can pull this off in a commercial gym you're doing very well.

If your using free weights,your 2 minutes is probably going to be spent changing plates anyway.

It's nice to hear Kim say that he is not a fan of being sick or getting through a workout as fast as you possibly can. The way things have been going round here, I was beginning to think that both were a necessity.
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siouxcountry

Hi Kim,

Your posts at Iron History are amongst my favorites. Sorry that board didn't work out for you.

How is your book coming along?
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k38wood

you need to proceed through your work-out as fast as you CAN...but rest long
enough so that you can give a maximum
effort on the next set...2 minute rest intervals are a pretty good "teaching point". "Metabolic conditioning" is a
result of your training. Throwing your-self (or some-one else) into "metabolic chaos" is kind of stupid.(Arthur Jones always said "you gotta be tough and you gotta be smart..." This motto applies to
training also...)
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manzo

Mr Wood,
It is great to have you posting on this forum.

We all enjoy reading your stories about Arthur.
I do not want to torture you with questions but i was wondering if you could give some of your experiences during your time in the NFL.

How did the players take to your HIT style of training?

You must have trained hundreds of players who had never trained in this way before. What was the players opinion of it?

I've read you have been a fan of using quite high reps throughout your career, could you give us some of your thoughts on this?

Thanks
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Ellington Darden

alan1 wrote:
Mr Wood,
It is great to have you posting on this forum.

We all enjoy reading your stories about Arthur.
I do not want to torture you with questions but i was wondering if you could give some of your experiences during your time in the NFL.

How did the players take to your HIT style of training?

You must have trained hundreds of players who had never trained in this way before. What was the players opinion of it?

I've read you have been a fan of using quite high reps throughout your career, could you give us some of your thoughts on this?

Thanks


Kim Wood can certainly answer your questions. In the new book, however, he does a great job of talking about his NFL experiences, as well as why he performed high reps in his early training years. His chapter 2 is one of the best in the book.

Ellington

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k38wood

working in the NFL as long as I did
I learned that "presentation" is extremely important...that is, how
you introduce new ideas to people is going to be a very real factor in those people accepting the new ideas.
The basics of high intensity training
(the high intensity training of Arthur Jones...the same high intensity training
that Ell has written about and represented so well over the years)
were the only philosophy I've ever used
in teaching athletes how to train...

With Ell's new book(and all his other books) and the best writings of Arthur Jones
everything is right there for you...
the trick is to UNDERSTAND these concepts and not just BELIEVE them.

(I learned from Arthur that when I first trained some-one it was important
that they "liked" the type of training
and got the sense that they were going to get great results...it was important that the new trainee "get the message"(the positive
message) and not that I "teach 'em a lesson" and get 'em sick and show 'em what a tough guy I was and they weren't. I almost never
saw Arthur push a new trainee too hard... )

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Tom Traynor

Not hijack thread, but WHEN is the new book due?

Thanks to Kim Woods for sharing time and info.
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manzo

Thanks for the reply Mr Wood.


Ellington Darden wrote:
In the new book, however, he does a great job of talking about his NFL experiences, as well as why he performed high reps in his early training years. His chapter 2 is one of the best in the book.


I look forward to reading it. Thanks.
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