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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
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This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

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Pectoralis Adduction
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henry_bordeaux

Dr. Darden,

Another one. Do you know why AJ did not develop a machine especially for the Adduction function of the Pectoralis, while developing one for the latissimus was done? Was ever thought about such a machine?

best regards,

Henry
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Ellington Darden

Henry,

Please define what you mean by "adduction function of the pectoralis?"

Ellington
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henry_bordeaux

Dr. Darden,

as far as i understand, the pectoralis is involved in horizontal shoulder adduction, in shoulder flexion, and vertical shoulder adduction.

something like the 10? chest, but the other way around. done on a 45? decline bench.
wouldn't this lead to the greatest contraction of the sternal head of pectoralis.


regards,

Henry


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henry_bordeaux

Working out with conventional equipment one can do cable crossovers with an position of contraction similar to the one shown on the picture. working the arms very close to the body.

the decline press on the double shoulder works some of this range of motion but not full range.
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Cherry

are you familiar with the Torso machine
(or maybe it is called Behind Neck Torso)?

accomplished the action you refer to but better because it did not involve or need gripping. you pushed with elbows. fantastic machine, better than any cable, i loved it!
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henry_bordeaux

cherry,

sure i know the nautilus behind neck machine, that was the one i was referring to in the original post, when i said that a machine for the vertical adduction was produced for the latissimus.

but to accomplish this for the chest, you have to cross your arms in front of your torso. bringing them down and together. while in all those regular machines, you bring them together, but not down.
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Ellington Darden

Henry,

Jones's Nautilus Double Chest Machine, the primary movement called the Arm Cross, achieved the exact function you're talking about.

What you are misunderstanding, however, is that crossing the hands is not necessary. Your pectoral muscles attach to your upper arms, so the key is the movement of your upper arms or elbows, not your hands and forearms.

Thus, if you keep your shoulder blades retracted during the movement (which is proper form), then it becomes very difficult to get the Arm Cross pads to touch in the middle.

Properly performed, the Nautilus Arm Cross exercise stretches and contracts the pectoral muscles like no other exercise. It was one of Jones's best machines.

Ellington
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henry_bordeaux

Ellington Darden wrote:
Henry,

Jones's Nautilus Double Chest Machine, the primary movement called the Arm Cross, achieved the exact function you're talking about.

What you are misunderstanding, however, is that crossing the hands is not necessary. Your pectoral muscles attach to your upper arms, so the key is the movement of your upper arms or elbows, not your hands and forearms.

Thus, if you keep your shoulder blades retracted during the movement (which is proper form), then it becomes very difficult to get the Arm Cross pads to touch in the middle.

Properly performed, the Nautilus Arm Cross exercise stretches and contracts the pectoral muscles like no other exercise. It was one of Jones's best machines.

Ellington





Dr.Darden,


if i put my right arm in the exact end position of the arm cross exercise, and if i then straighten my arm and then move it further to the left side of my body and a bit down the feeling of contraction increases much.

it is clear to me that what happens to the hands and forearms is of no concern in the case of the pectoralis. but the crossing of the arms leads to a greater range of motion. or am i wrong?


regards,

Henry
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Ellington Darden

Henry,

To get that greater range of motion, that you're referring to, requires that you round your shoulders (protraction) in the contracted position. But it's not working your pectorals more.

Try to do the same movement with your shoulder blades pinched together (retraction) and you should feel it in your chest muscles to a greater degree.

Plus, the leaning-back postion that you're in on the Double Chest machine makes the Arm Cross movement actually a declined exercise . . . again, if you perform it properly.

Ellington
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Ellington Darden

Henry,

If you go on the Nautilus.com Web site, in their commercial strength equipment section, and look at the Nautilus Nitro Pec Fly machine. This too performs the function you're after.

Ellington
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cmg

Ellington Darden wrote:
Henry,

To get that greater range of motion, that you're referring to, requires that you round your shoulders (protraction) in the contracted position. But it's not working your pectorals more.

Try to do the same movement with your shoulder blades pinched together (retraction) and you should feel it in your chest muscles to a greater degree.

Plus, the leaning-back postion that you're in on the Double Chest machine makes the Arm Cross movement actually a declined exercise . . . again, if you perform it properly.

Ellington


Hello Dr. Darden,

Are you supposed to keep your shoulder blades pinched together on all chest exercises (fly, bench, incline bench etc.)? How about back, shoulders, etc.?

Thank you,

Ron

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Ellington Darden

I like keeping the shoulder blades pinched together on all chest exercises.

On back-lat exercises, I've done them both ways: pinched and rounded, plus in-between. There are lengthy discussion points surrounding the whys and why nots of each.

Ellington
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henry_bordeaux

Ellington Darden wrote:
Henry,

If you go on the Nautilus.com Web site, in their commercial strength equipment section, and look at the Nautilus Nitro Pec Fly machine. This too performs the function you're after.

Ellington




Dr. Darden,

thanks for answering all those questions. I remember using the Nitro Pec Fly Machine for some workouts. And it felt very good to me. better then the arm cross portion of the double chest. but this may be, as usual, only a matter of personal preference.

best regards,

Henry
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Ellington Darden wrote:
I like keeping the shoulder blades pinched together on all chest exercises.

On back-lat exercises, I've done them both ways: pinched and rounded, plus in-between. There are lengthy discussion points surrounding the whys and why nots of each.

Ellington


Same here. We instruct clients to keep the chest high and shoulders back while performing both the chest press and fly.
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cmg

Ellington Darden wrote:
I like keeping the shoulder blades pinched together on all chest exercises.

On back-lat exercises, I've done them both ways: pinched and rounded, plus in-between. There are lengthy discussion points surrounding the whys and why nots of each.

Ellington



Thank you Dr. Darden.

Regards,

Ron
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