MB Madaera
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Chris Madaera
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Keelan Parham
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Power To The People
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Tom71

I was digging through my old books the other day while cleaning/organizing and came across Pavel's "Power To The People" book. I agree, goofy name and not the best book for sure. But I did find at least some of his arguments, especially concerning the relationship of load, rep count and volume, interesting.

Anyone ever give this a whirl? If so,what did/do you think? Just curious.

Tom
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Cherry

Give what a whirl? Give a summary of his methods?
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STanner

Texas, USA

Tom71 wrote:
I was digging through my old books the other day while cleaning/organizing and came across Pavel's "Power To The People" book. I agree, goofy name and not the best book for sure. But I did find at least some of his arguments, especially concerning the relationship of load, rep count and volume, interesting.

Anyone ever give this a whirl? If so,what did/do you think? Just curious.

Tom

It's nothing new, nothing special. I used to own the book but threw it away, as anything Pavel teaches can be found in a summary of the book.
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MKM

PTTP strength program briefly:

- one deadlift exercise and one press exercise
- both trained five times a week with 2 sets of 5 reps
- cycling weights, never to failure
- tensing all the muscles, squeezing hard

For muscle mass Pavel recommends less frequency (like 3 times per week) and more sets (10+ per exercise).

I know lots of people who have followed this or similar Russian routines. Most of them have gained very well.
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Wolfie

It's worth a shot if you can devote a decent amount of time to give it a fair trial. I've tried the PTP program, the offshoot called the "Russian Bear", and just about every variation of the two. In retrospect, I was hoping the lower intensity but higher volume would allow the same gains as busting my bee-hind with HIT has given me. All I got was a loss of muscle mass and a waste of a couple months of my training life.
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Tom Traynor

The biggest thing I learned from Pavel's writings is setting the body tension when doing the exercise (irradation, I think he calls it?). It is almost a requirement to do free-weight (especially standing) exercises at max intensity (which he DOESN"T espouse).

If there is an inherent disadvantage with machines it is that one can RELY on pads and supports and guided movement patterns--leaving much of the body relaxed. I get more output (reps/weight lifted) out of a set--machine or otherwise--if I set body tension ("core"--abs/glutes) even if I don't seemingly HAVE to.

Other than that, it well known that he CANNOT deadlift even close to 500 lbs. (entered a meet last year with published results) though the deadlift is the core lift to much of his training. Hmmmm.
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shlevon

Tom Traynor wrote:
The biggest thing I learned from Pavel's writings is setting the body tension when doing the exercise (irradation, I think he calls it?). It is almost a requirement to do free-weight (especially standing) exercises at max intensity (which he DOESN"T espouse).

If there is an inherent disadvantage with machines it is that one can RELY on pads and supports and guided movement patterns--leaving much of the body relaxed. I get more output (reps/weight lifted) out of a set--machine or otherwise--if I set body tension ("core"--abs/glutes) even if I don't seemingly HAVE to.

Other than that, it well known that he CANNOT deadlift even close to 500 lbs. (entered a meet last year with published results) though the deadlift is the core lift to much of his training. Hmmmm.



IIRC, he deadlifted ~460's or something, but he chose to use a hook grip.

I'd have a hard time believing he can't pull 500 with an over/under grip and a little bit of practice if he can pull that much with a hook.
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karma50

Guys,
Back when I did mostly BW exercises, I got Pavel's book "Naked Warrior". I've read a number of his on line articles. He is very much into the "functional fitness" philosophy, and doesn't care much about maximum lifts for most people.

He believes in a more skill oriented approach, maintaining that a lot of strength is really body control, or skill. He is inmvolved with training athletes and cops, etc.

I think his training philosophy is confused on the strength vs. skill issue, but you can certainly get fit doing his routines, especially if conditioning is your goal. I also believe you do have to develop skill for doing FW and BW stuff, ( I use dumbbells and BW) but I'm not at all convinced these skills transfer to anything else.
Griff
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