MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
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Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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The Big Routine
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markandspike

How To Do the Big Routine

? Squats with barbell
(immediately followed by)
? Pullovers with one dumbbell
? Squats with barbell
(immediately followed by)
? Pullovers with one dumbbell
? Leg curls or leg extensions (alternate)
? Lateral raises with dumbbells
? Dips
? Chin-ups
? Negative dips
? Negative chin-ups


Squats with Barbell

With the recommended slow, smooth style (ten-second positive and five-second negative), you'll need 30-40% less resistance than you normally use for ten repetitions. Position the loaded barbell behind your neck and across your trapezius muscles. Straighten your legs to lift the bar off the rack and move back one step. Place your feet shoulder-width apart, toes slightly angled outward.

Bend your hips and knees and smoothly descend to a position whereby your hamstrings firmly come in contact with your calves. Without bouncing, or without stopping in the bottom position, slowly make the turnaround from negative to positive. Take ten seconds to lift the barbell back to the top position. Do not lock your legs. Keep a bend of approximately 15 degrees in your knees. Repeat the five-second lowering and ten-second lifting for maximum repetitions ? which should be in the five to six range.

Because of the intensity of slow squatting, breathing can be a problem for some trainees. For best results, especially during the lifting phase, you need to practice taking a series of short, rapid breaths with emphasis on blowing out rather than taking in large gulps of air. Doing so keeps your focus on the working muscles. After the final repetition, move immediately to the pullover.


Pullovers with One Dumbbell

Lie crossways on a bench with your shoulders in contact with the bench and your head and lower body relaxed and off the bench. Hold a dumbbell on one end in both hands and position it over your chest with your arms straight. Take a deep breath and lower the dumbbell smoothly in five seconds behind your head. Stretch in the extended position. Try to keep your elbows straight. Raise the dumbbell slowly in ten seconds. Repeat for maximum repetitions.


Squats with Barbell

I rarely have trainees perform a second set of an exercise. This routine, however, breaks that rule. Use the same weight on the second set of squats that you used on the first set. Also, try to do the same number of repetitions on both sets. Again, after the final repetition, get the squat bar back into the racks, lie across the bench, and start doing pullovers.


Pullovers with One Dumbbell

You'll be breathing like a freight train on your pullovers, and that's good. That's no excuse to slack off on the intensity or the repetitions. Afterward, get a big drink of water and walk around for approximately two minutes.


Leg Curls or Leg Extensions

Do not do both of these exercises on the same day. For example, on Monday, do the leg extension. On Wednesday, perform the leg curl. Remember to adhere to the 10-5 count on each repetition.


Lateral Raises with Dumbbells

Be sure to keep your elbows and wrists locked as you perform this great deltoid-building exercise.


Dips

Smooth, slow, 10-5 dips are a real bear. Try to eliminate all momentum from each repetition.


Chin-Ups

If dips are a bear, then 10-5 chin-ups are a dinosaur. You're plenty strong if you can accomplish four good repetitions.


Negative Dips

Climb up fast and lower your body slowly in eight to ten seconds. If you can do more than six repetitions, you'll need to belt some weight around your hips.


Negative Chin-Ups

This is a terrific closing exercise for the Big Routine. You can certainly work your biceps, lats, and abdominals to a deep level of fatigue. Remember to climb up fast, and lower yourself smoothly and slowly. Stop when you can no longer control your negative speed. And don't be afraid to belt added weight to your hips when the movements become less difficult.


Reduce Your Exercises

Only ten exercises for a workout may not sound like a demanding routine. But if each exercise is performed in the recommended smooth, slow style I guarantee that you'll be taxed to the maximum.

Perform the routine on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for two weeks.

Use as much resistance as you can on each exercise. A training partner can be a definite asset in counting seconds and getting the form just right.

During week three, I recommend that you drop the second set of squats and pullovers. You'll be doing eight exercises, instead of ten.

For week four, eliminate the regular dip and chin-up. This means you only perform six exercises three times per week. And six exercises will be a welcome relief, I promise. It will also allow you to concentrate on the negative dip and the negative chin-up. Add plenty of resistance around your hips and do some heavy, very focused reps.

That's the schedule. Give it your best effort for four weeks. I think you'll be amazed ? especially if you've never tried doing the smooth, slow speed of movement on each exercise.

Sounds like another chapter from ellingtons new book
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waynegr

Switzerland

markandspike wrote:
Sounds like another chapter from ellingtons new book


It's from an old book; Big.

Wayne

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markandspike

Try chapter 22.
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Tom71


With the recommended slow, smooth style (ten-second positive and five-second negative), you'll need 30-40%


Dr. Darden,

Just a quick question. Given what you know now would you make adjustments to the above statement. Specifically, would you now recommend using normal, non-reduced weights while changing the pace of the movement to say five second positive and five second negative with an eye towards a reasonable TUL of 40-60 seconds?

Tom
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Ellington Darden

Tom,

Today, I'd probably do most reps 10/10, 5/5, or 3/3.

Ellington
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Ciccio

Ellington Darden wrote:
Tom,

Today, I'd probably do everything 10/10, 5/5, or 3/3.

Ellington


With all due respect Ellington, given the findings of Joe Mullen and recent discussions about cadence I believe 10/5 (or even 10/4 how it was formulated initially) is much better then the 10/10 later on advocated.

Franco

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Ellington Darden

Franco,

It would be interesting to do a study and compare matched groups doing 10/10, 10/5, and 3/3 . . . with all of them failing at approximately 60 seconds.

Ellington
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Ciccio

Ellington Darden wrote:
Franco,

It would be interesting to do a study and compare matched groups doing 10/10, 10/5, and 3/3 . . . with all of them failing at approximately 60 seconds.

Ellington


Sure it would be. But that's up to you ;)
And good you mention the TUL-limit of 60seconds. I believe this for sure to be more effective then the very long TUL's in BIG. At least for upper body.

I think I will test it with 10/4 and only 2 workouts per week, starting in christmas holidays.
If so, I will let you know how it went.

Franco



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