MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
How Much Have Your Progressed?
Author
Rating
Options

fraserme

And how long did it take you?

Basically I was wondering what kind of testimonials people have out there. I was hoping for some more of this from the "Progress how much and how long" thread, but a lot of it was defining what everyone's perspective of progress was.

I'm relatively new to true HIT. And I am already trying to make adjustments in it's application as given by Dr. Darden due to a calorie deficit diet.

So come on guys, let's see how well it's worked and a brief description of how you applied it. Such as the true full body, approximately 8-12 exercises done 3 days a week, or was there a variation that's worked well for you.
Open User Options Menu

HDHITFAN

its hard for me to acurately say my record keeping is a bit rough but in last 3-4 months ive increased strenth slowly but consistantly each workout lost 10 kgs and kept same girth measurements so im relatively happy hopefully ill reach goal B/W then increse calories and hopefully more muscle.
Open User Options Menu

fraserme

So what kind of frequency and working set count are you using?
Open User Options Menu

HDHITFAN

one set to failure 3-5exercises per workout once every 5 days 4/4 cadence
Open User Options Menu

josh_pitts

Ontario, CAN

when i first started high intensity training doing 10 to 12 exercises to failure, 2 to 3 times a week, my body weight went from 180 to 200 lbs in the first month and a half. And i was definitely leaner than when i started. I had not made any significant gains until then and i had been lifting for about three years.

a little over a month ago i almost weighed 210 but i started playing football for my university and was forced to partake in their training program. my weight has actually dropped to 195. but now my season is over so i can resume proper training.

Josh
Open User Options Menu

fraserme

Thanks for the feedback so far guys.

Anyone else have these good results?

I really want to know, within the range of reality, what is possible and realistically how quick.
Open User Options Menu

Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

When I first started weight lifting I was 162lbs. At 6"4 this is about as skinny as you can look. I had alright sized legs from sports, so you can imagine how thin my upper body was.

I shot up to 185 in 2 months of doing a typical high volume routine. 6 days a week, multiple sets of multiple exercises. The workouts were about 1 hour long.

I spent the next year and a bit doing different exercises, always HVT and eventually getting up to 195 which was my best lean weight on a HVT plan. For the next 2 years I would get very sick atleast once if not twice a year. Drop 10lbs each time as I could barely eat for a week and then spend a few months gaining it back. The sickness always happened during my hockey season. I did not understand limited recovery ability at that time.

During one summer about 2 years ago now, I got my bodyweight up to an alltime high of 218. I was taking weight gainer shakes twice a day and smoothed right out. I never became fat, but I did not like the way I looked and always had a bloated stomach. Looked a little like I was on HGH.

I took out the shakes, redued my eating, kept training but only 5 days a week instead of 6. As soon as hockey hit, I got sick, dropped down to 185 and then once healthy back to me best of 195 lean.

Then last winter I read Mike Mentzer. I knew little about who he was at the time, but his book made sense to me and was a radical departure from HVT. Doing his program from Heavy Duty 2. I got my bodyweight up to 202 during hockey season while getting stronger in everylift. The workouts were 10 mins long and I was doing them once every 4 days.

I stayed on this program for 4 months, getting stronger every workout but never getting above 202. I attribute the gain more to just taking out so much volume as I feel now that Mentzers program atleast for me is too little.

Mentzer always mentioned being influenced by Arthur Jones. So I went out to read everything AJ wrote. This also ofcourse led me to Dr. Dardens work. From Here I started doing fullbody workouts with 3 days off in between. Normally 10 exercises. I hit 205 almost over night and in a couple of months got up to 210.

From here I started learning about negative training. I started doing Negative only training. I only did 5- 6 exercises because I understood how demanding it was. The weights increased very quickly, using the stack plus plates and many machines. I had to take 5 days off in between or I felt to tired to train and could not go up in weight. To my dismay I dropped to 206 and my positive strength was exactly the same as what it was before training negative only.

206 is the weight I went into this hockey season with. I am on the ice 4x a week plus we are put through a completely pointless dryland circuit which only hurts my recovery ability and is of little value to me. i cannot train legs during the season as it almost immediately results in overtraining. Also evaluation camp is very demanding. My weight dropped to 195 again. At this point I knew fullbody twice a week is perfect for me, assuming I am off season.

After meeting Brian Johnston I have switched to Jreps and my weight it coming back up. It works great because it works the muscles very throughly but is less systematically draining. I haven't weight myself today but I would assume Im around 200. Easily the biggest my upperbody has ever been but with on obvious size loss in my legs. (as I said before I don't train them much or at all during the season)

I believe by implementing Jreps and working out no more than twice a week, come off-season I will be able to increase my Bodyweight to an all time muscular high of 225. Maybe beyond. We shall see. 163 to 210 is a 47 lbs gain in muscle. Bodyfat should be about the same but it wouldn't be much lower or higher at both weights to make a huge difference to the numbers.

Also we have been experimenting Jreps on 3 subjects,(one being myself). Never have I been able to gain as quickly in my upperbody during the hockey season on any other program. Another subject used it to get over 180 as he had been stuck around 175-177 for sometime. He has also increased his definition at this weight. The 3rd subject put 1/2 inch on his arms in just over 3 weeks.
Very impressive.

So I hope this helps. This is a brief summary of my trial and errors to find what works and what doesn't. I have been able to help most miss alot of my errors and get them great results by simply starting them at Fullbody HIT done twice a week.

Michael
Open User Options Menu

tc16

My progress over the last 6 weeks:
SLDL - 72kg to 85kg 10-12
Chin- b/w - 6-8 to 30lbs added
Dip - b/w - 6-8 to 52lbs added.

I've now gone back to 3 x week and seeing some real progress, this is David Hudlow's 2 week routine, a corker as fa as I'm concerned. The new book and forum has made me realise how much effort you have to put into this and not just talk about it. JFDI.

The biggest influence in this is Dr Dardens book and Kim Wood's straight talking. Its only weights after all, the book and this forum has renewed my passion for just going in the gym, 'and just having it'. I have now been doing that and seeing results that I've not seen for a while. I'm sure (that I still can't get to the intensity level that I want) but every time now I go to work out, I want to better my last one. That's a feeling that left me for a while and I'm glad it's back.

It's all about working your a** off.



has much to do with this forum as well as Dr. D's book. I (personally) don't think there is a better A/B routine than the one David Hudlow performed. I think that Kim Wood has it spot on and I would like th
Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

Michael,

Thanks for sharing your interesting quest for muscular size and strength. How about summarizing for us the three primary concepts you've learned from your experiences?

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

tc16

got cut off there...thank him for his input, it's no-nonsense, just go in there there and lift the weight. Job done. (as we say in the UK).
Open User Options Menu

Ellington Darden

tc16,

Yes, Kim Wood is about training hard. But if you reread all his comments, he's also about training SMART. They both go together.

Ellington
Open User Options Menu

tc16

Ellington,

I have read the chapters and I completely agree about training 'smart' as well as hard. It is a very fine line, I personally have found that training with that bit more intensity, has really helped my workouts.

What's really inspired me as well was is the quote (I don't have the book to hand so I won't quote it exactly), a bodybuilder's aim is to make an exercise harder not easier, this is so true and I have now done 'preacher curls' instead of bicep curls, boy am I feeling it.

What I am really am enjoying is being reminded that is just takes 'pure hard work and just do it'.

Ty
Open User Options Menu

Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Ellington Darden wrote:
Michael,

Thanks for sharing your interesting quest for muscular size and strength. How about summarizing for us the three primary concepts you've learned from your experiences?

Ellington


The 3 main things I would say helped my progress the most are.

1. Intensity. Without this no matter what program you are on, you will never come close to your potential if you can't push yourself.

2. Consistency. Rome wasn't built in a day and neither is a very musclur body. With this being said though it has to be kept in check. For atleast 2 years I never missed a gym day and I was training 5-6 times per week. I thought it was needed at the time. As for now its only 2x per week but it is very easy to get away from your training entirely. Have the discipline to make sure you are getting your workouts done.

3. Balance. - and this relates to many things. I found when I obsessed over my development it was much slower then when I would just do my workout and not think about it to much till the next workout. I learned to concentrate more on life then working out. Also a balanced diet. I like most use to emphasize protein way to much. Also make sure you get ample sleep. If you keep everything balanced in your lifestyle then finding success in building muscle will be much easier.

I have a few others that are important but those would be my top 3.

Michael

Open User Options Menu

Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Hello fraserme

My last answer was a little long so I will give you a short answer to your original question.

Twice now the fastest I have seen muscle growth is 20lb in 8 weeks and 25lbs in 4 months.

Both subjects had done a little lifting in high school but this was there first time on a regular program.

25lbs in 4 months was HVT. 6 days per week 1 1/2 hours a session. If you do the math I belive its just under 150 hours of gym time.

The other guy put on 20lbs by doing 2 fullbody HIT sessions a week. The workout was never more than 20 mins. and the 8th week he actually did not train to help recovery ability. So if my math is correct he spent just over 4 1/2 hours of training.

with this being said both subjects were very able and willing to push as hard as they could.

What route would you rather take though??

Michael
Open User Options Menu

fraserme

Coolness!!!

Thanks so much all of you guys for the comments and feedback.

Hey Mike, cool avatar (I think that's what you call them, the HULK picture).

But a serious question Mike, what kind of diet were these guys on? Was there any creatine loading or anything else? I assume they were both in a calorie surplus or else they wouldn't have gained weight. And also, do you know how much or if they gained much fat with the actual weight gain.

20 pounds in 8 weeks, that totally rocks.

I am currently adjusted my volume down to 3 whole body A-B workouts a week. But I only do 5 exercises each workout. Workout A is dips, chins, deadlifts, abs and military press. And workout B is bent barbell rows, full squats, bench press, calf raises and barbell curls. I've had pretty decent results with this mix in the past, but I was only doing it twice a week and twice a week aerobic work.

But I didn't take them to complete failure and my rep speed was quite a bit faster than what I am using now. Plus I am now getting between 8-9 hours of sleep a night too. Before I was going on about 6-7.

We'll see how things go.

Brian

P.S. Mike,I saw Jreps mentioned in Dr. Darden's new book and you mentioned it in your post above;but I didn't notice a description on what it is in the book. Is it described in the book or could Mike or someone explain to me how it works so maybe I could see how they work for me.

Thanks again
Open User Options Menu

Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

fraserme wrote:
Coolness!!!

Thanks so much all of you guys for the comments and feedback.

Hey Mike, cool avatar (I think that's what you call them, the HULK picture).

But a serious question Mike, what kind of diet were these guys on? Was there any creatine loading or anything else? I assume they were both in a calorie surplus or else they wouldn't have gained weight. And also, do you know how much or if they gained much fat with the actual weight gain.

20 pounds in 8 weeks, that totally rocks.

I am currently adjusted my volume down to 3 whole body A-B workouts a week. But I only do 5 exercises each workout. Workout A is dips, chins, deadlifts, abs and military press. And workout B is bent barbell rows, full squats, bench press, calf raises and barbell curls. I've had pretty decent results with this mix in the past, but I was only doing it twice a week and twice a week aerobic work.

But I didn't take them to complete failure and my rep speed was quite a bit faster than what I am using now. Plus I am now getting between 8-9 hours of sleep a night too. Before I was going on about 6-7.

We'll see how things go.

Brian

P.S. Mike,I saw Jreps mentioned in Dr. Darden's new book and you mentioned it in your post above;but I didn't notice a description on what it is in the book. Is it described in the book or could Mike or someone explain to me how it works so maybe I could see how they work for me.

Thanks again


Glad you like the Hulk picture. It says DETERMINATION underneath but it is too small to see.

Both subject were not on any special diet. Just told to eat when hungry and make sure to get as much good whole food as possible. Calories were not counted. The guy doing HVT looked leaner but could have been a result of just having more muscle. Body fat was probably about the same or maybe lower.

The guy doing HIT looked leaner for sure. He lost Bodyfat without a doubt.
I would like to note that neither were on any supplements of any kind during the gains.

As for Jreps, contact brain Johnston. I think he name on this boared is logicbdj. his website is www.exercisecertification.com. There is no way of explaining everything you need to know about the method, but the short of it is breaking any movement down into zones. Normally 2 or 3, and training till failure in each zone. The pump is incredible and can literally last for days.

Any more questions, just ask.

Michael
Open User Options Menu

fraserme

Thanks again Mike.

Can you enlighten me some more on the Jreps principle?

I know that you don't want to step on Brian Johnston's toes. And I don't want you to either. I just don't need another workout book.

If you feel comfortable to post more, that's cool. But if not, that's just as cool.

Or you could PM me or I could give you my e-mail address.

Whatever works for you, is fine for me.

Thanks
Brian
Open User Options Menu

Ryo

Switzerland

What's made a big difference in my progression is :

1) Train Lighter : I used to do sets of 8-10 reps with 80% of 1RM. It's when I decided to switch to 60% for sets of 15-20 reps that I made the best progress.

2) Focus on sinlge joint exercices insteed of the big basic. I was doing only chins and dips for upper body. Then I switched to pullover, flies, shoulders raises, curl and extensions. Better recruitment and deeper fatigue with less drain on nervous system.

I had 38cm arms for month even years Since I switched to LIGHTER WEIGHT and SINGLE JOINT movements I gained nearly 2cm on my arms with minimal fat gains. My strength increased a lot too especially on Pullover, Curl and Extensions.
I tried to train even lighter (20-50%) but it didn't boost progression. I think an optimal degree of muscular fatigue is reached when you train to failure at around 50-60% of your 1RM.

I always use One Set per bodypart and I often change my routine (because I'm often bored with the same split or I want to try different frequency). Actually I'm doing full body and I may continue with that. If you can handle them it's probably the best way to go. They allow maximum frequency per muscle and also maximum recovery (you can do only 1 FB per week).

I found I recover better with one HARD workout and some days off between rather than a lot of easier workouts (split routine) with a few rest days or no rest day between workouts.

Open User Options Menu

gorlando

Ryo wrote:


I found I recover better with one HARD workout and some days off between rather than a lot of easier workouts (split routine) with a few rest days or no rest day between workouts.



ryo,

split routine is easier as far as what?

gary
Open User Options Menu

fraserme

Thanks Ryo.

I appreciate the feedback.

Brian
Open User Options Menu

Ryo

Switzerland

"split routine is easier as far as what?"

If you do those 6* exercices in one workout it's harder than doing a 2 days split routine and only 3 exercises per workout. But with the split routine you'll have less rest days between workouts (if you want to train muscles with the same frequency).

*Squat
Deadlift
Bench Press
Overhead Press
Chins
Dips

Open User Options Menu
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy