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The 300: Workout?
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Zenontheterrible

man that guy is ripped!

i wonder what kind of work out he used
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

I seen the movie last week at a black curtain premier. Amazing movie. Got the testosterone going like no other.

I figured a question would be asked about what they did for this movie soon enough. Im sure it will be marketed.

Many of the actors were if very good shape. For those who don't go fait at the site of blood, this is a must see.

Michael
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cargo

Zenontheterrible wrote:
man that guy is ripped!

i wonder what kind of work out he used

it looks like some bootcamp crosfit stuff, i really have no idea. here is a video

http://raincloud.warnerbros.co...



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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

There was actually a link to a short clip on T-Nation a while back. They did some sort of cross-fit training alternating between weights or BW exercises and agility-type movements. One thing it showed was the guys doing sprints with a harness and bungie cord tied to their backs trying to reach a medicine ball that was placed further and further out.

I think this is it:
Training that the Spartan Actors Have been doing
http://youtube.com/...h?v=w6Eyg32W4aE
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Thanks for posting the video. I can't knock the workout too much because the results speak for themselves. All the actors in the movie were in top shape.

I think the real key is variation. That is what I believe is keeping many people away from best results weather doing HIT, HVT, Cross-fit, superslow, etc. Trainees get to ingrained into a program.

I believe variation is the best way to stimluate new muscle gains.

Michael
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HamsFitness

Mark Twight of Gym Jones was the the trainer and the style was crossfit, it has been tracked closely for a long time at crossfit.

I believe there was a falling out between Gym Jones and crossfit due to crossfit feeling he should have mentioned crossfit more in his interviews.

There are plenty of vids of them training out there - check out www.gymjones.com

Very jealous that you have seen it - will have to wait awhile in the UK for it
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

The movie comes out on the 9th of March here. I'm counting the days. It looks like it's going to rock.
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Ryan71

The guy is on the cover of the latest Men's Health magazine with an article about his training inside. The workout was mainly Crossfit style w/ Mark Twight, but in addition he did training sessions with a bodybuilder.
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RyanWallace

Massachusetts, USA

I read that article in the fitmag. I believe it said he didn't workout before the movie and doesn't workout after making the movie. Just an actor morphing himself for the role. Also he is a bit of a chainsmoker.
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SCN550

You can read about it in the March 2007 edition of Men's Health.
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Zenontheterrible

cargo thanx for the link that was a good vid. simon-hec i couldn't get the youtube one to work though

yeah the movie looks like its going to rock. I hope we didn't see the best of it in the trailer... ha:)
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ozman

Zenontheterrible wrote:
cargo thanx for the link that was a good vid. simon-hec i couldn't get the youtube one to work though

yeah the movie looks like its going to rock. I hope we didn't see the best of it in the trailer... ha:)


The trailor only touches it guys. saw it in Toronto at a sneak preview. Wow!!!! Gonna see it again. But, judge for yourselves guys when you see it. Remember, we get disappointed when we hype it up and happily surprised when we have no expectations. Enjoy.
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

Hey Ozman, did you see it at the downtown IMAX? I was there aswell. They had 3 rows right in the middle for Warner Brother employees and myspace people. Me and 2 friends convinced them we were from Warner brothers and got to set in those seats, it was great.

Again to those who haven't seen it, I can't stress enough how impressed I was with this movie. Im just going to get a copy of it and loop it on a TV in my gym to keep me jacked at all times. lol. Incredible movie.

Michael
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RyanWallace

Massachusetts, USA

I personally don't get the train like a spartan warrior overtraining like you are going to war because in war we train until we drop mentality. I read that they left their weaker babies on a mountain to die...they started training at age 7 and retired from the miltary at the age of 30...if they survived their wars and extreme physical demands.

That might have been great 3000 years ago and might be great for a movie..which I plan to see...but I want to live a long healthy life without injuries and I hope trainers/coaches don't start taking from the spartan training methods and bringing it to a client with the "if you want to look like them..train like them" approach.
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ozman

bigmikep wrote:
Hey Ozman, did you see it at the downtown IMAX? I was there aswell. They had 3 rows right in the middle for Warner Brother employees and myspace people. Me and 2 friends convinced them we were from Warner brothers and got to set in those seats, it was great.

Again to those who haven't seen it, I can't stress enough how impressed I was with this movie. Im just going to get a copy of it and loop it on a TV in my gym to keep me jacked at all times. lol. Incredible movie.

Michael


Hey Bigmikep..

yes, I was there. Good one. I wanted to stay and watch it again. I so look forward to getting the movie. Not oone bad part in that movie. Ohh. good luck at your new job at warner brothers..hahahahaha
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Robert Francis

New York, USA

Hello Ryan,
It was actually quite a bit worse than you have heard. Witnesses of the day observed not merely the killing of babies judged to be unfit but a really brutal life of nonstop boot-camp. Theirs was a warrior culture and every man male born to it was a soldier and trained for war his entire life.

Sounds brutal but when they were needed to save Western civilization from three seperate Persian invaisions and not to mention a madman dictator from Athens at one point-they showed up and opened up such an impossible can of whoop-ass that hollywood only NOW has the special effects to show it on screen.

Both revered and feared in their own time, these Spartans were such bronze age badasses that in most cases when they showed up on the battlefield their enemies used to run away in their own terror piss.

Read "Gates of Fire" and "Tides of War" both by Steven Pressfield.
Anyone who fancies himself such a badass needs to compare himself to an "average" Spartan
zand....
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Not to mention reading the graphic novel * by Frank Miller that's the source for the movie.

*expensive comic book
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

These guys were about as tough as they get. Check out the following from the Wikipedia article on Sparta:


Spartan boys left home for military boarding school at the age of seven, and were required to serve in the army until age thirty.[6] Then they passed into the active reserve, where they remained until the age of sixty. Spartan education from the ages of seven to thirty emphasised physical toughness, steadfastness in military ranks, and absolute obedience to orders. The ordinary Spartan was a citizen-warrior, or hoplite, trained to obey and endure; he became a politician only if chosen as ephor for a single year. He could be elected a life member of the council after his sixtieth year, in which he would be free from military service. Men could marry at the age of twenty but could not live with their families until they left their active military service at age thirty.[6] The Spartans perfected the craft of hoplite warfare. They called themselves "homoioi" (similars), pointing to their common lifestyle and the discipline of the phalanx, which demanded that no soldier be superior to his comrades.[7]

If male babies born in Sparta were too small, weak or sick (all of which were believed as early signs that they would not be suitable for military life), they were abandoned on the slopes of Mt. Taygetos, also known as Apothetae or Place Of Rejection. The Spartans began military training about the age of 7, where they would enter the agoge system for the education and training--everything from physical training such as hunting and dancing, to emotional and spiritual training. At that age they would have to go through what was known as the gauntlet. They would have to run around a group of older children, who would flog them continually with whips, sometimes to death. As they were lightly clothed, and had no bedding to speak of, children would often put thistles in their pallet because the prickling sensation made them feel warmer. From the age of 13 onward, they would be assorted into groups, and sent into the countryside (with nothing, though some falsely believe they had knives), and forced to survive on their skills and cunning; this was called the Krypteia, believed to be an initiation rite to seek out and kill Helots who were considered to be troublesome to the state, or were found to be wandering the countryside with no good reason.

At the age of twenty, the Spartan began his membership in one of the syssitia (dining messes or clubs), composed of about fifteen members each, of which every citizen was required to be a member. Here each group learned how to bond and rely on one another. The Spartan exercised the full rights and duties of a citizen at the age of thirty. Only native Spartans were considered full citizens, and needed to undergo the training as prescribed by law, and participation in and contribution to one of the dining-clubs. Those who fulfilled these conditions were considered "peers," (homoioi) citizens in the fullest sense of the word, while those who failed were called "lesser citizens," and retained only the civil rights of citizenship.

Spartans were absolutely debarred by law from trade or manufacture, which consequently rested in the hands of the perioeci, and were forbidden (in theory) to possess either gold or silver. Spartan currency consisted of bars of iron, thus making thievery and foreign commerce very difficult and discouraging the accumulation of riches. Wealth was, in theory at least, derived entirely from landed property, and consisted in the annual return made by the Helots, who cultivated the plots of ground allotted to the Spartans. But this attempt to equalize property proved a failure: from the earliest times, there were marked differences of wealth within the state, and these became even more serious after the law of Epitadeus, passed at some time after the Peloponnesian War, removed the legal prohibition of the gift or bequest of land. Helots were ruthlessly controlled, primarily through the secret police or Krypteia.
Spartan hoplite
Spartan hoplite

Full citizens, released from any economic activity, were given a piece of land (kleros), which was cultivated and run by the Helots. As time went on, greater portions of land were concentrated in the hands of large landholders, but the number of full citizens declined. Citizens had numbered 10,000 at the beginning of the 5th century BC, but had decreased by Aristotle's day (384?322BC) to less than 1,000, and had further decreased to 700 at the accession of Agis IV in 244 BC. Attempts were made to remedy this situation by creating new laws. Certain penalties were imposed upon those who remained unmarried or who married too late in life. These laws, however, came too late and were ineffective in reversing the trend.

Perhaps the most widely known event on the efficiency of the Spartan war-machine is related to the Persian Wars. The Spartan stand at the Battle of Thermopylae has been repeatedly cited in a military Grand Strategy context as a role model on the advantages of training, strategy and bravery against extremely overwhelming odds.
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Robert Francis

New York, USA

Bill De Simone wrote:
Not to mention reading the graphic novel * by Frank Miller that's the source for the movie.

*expensive comic book


Right Bill,
I picked mine off of eBay in '05 for just $16.00, probably more now after the hype...But what a motivator!

Going to see it in NYC on saturday at 4:00 on the IMAX near Columbus Circle. Why dont you and your boy meet us there, we've got reserves at Delfriscos for after the show.
zand....
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Robert Francis

New York, USA

Hi Drew,
I like that history piece you found on wikipedia.
In my collection I've got dialogues of Thucidides, Herododus (Whose details on the battle of Thermopylae are riveting)and other contemporaries weave together a fairly complex description of a civilization that posessed a great knowlege of self improvement by what could be described as "progressive hardship".

As compared to progressive resistance-this concept was a lifestyle ascetic and as described by Herodotus as their "Contempt of Pleasure".
The whipping of boys for no reason apparant to outsiders and recorded by numerous witnesses was made even the more horrifying when 15 year old boys are whipped with chains, on their chests, back, arms and legs while displaying absolute indifference on their faces.They niether bled nor displayed any discomfort.

What was never seen was the early training where toddlers were stroked at first with light leather thongs and later flicked. As the child became inured to the sensation, tougher and tougher leathers were used and eventually heavy leather rope, then increasingly heavy chains. This formed a callous so thick on their chest, backs and legs as to make them near arrow proof. Spartans enjoyed showing small examples to outsiders of their mind boggling toughness as a kind of warning.

But toughness was not the only virtue associated with the Spartans. There was another story that goes like this;

An old man is searching for a seat at the Olympic games. As he is jeered by each group to shove off-and move along and laughed at-he finally gets to the bleechers where the Spartan contingent sit.

As soon as he arrives, a group of strong young Spartans stand and beg him to "take MY seat"- after which the old man is heard to say, "All Greeks know what is right, and talk, and sing about what is right...but only the Spartans will do it, and never speak a word of it".
zand....
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

They sound like a very interesting culture. I'm going to pick up the books you mentioned earlier in the thread. Are there any others you recommend?
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

I really like their attitude towards drinking:

"Although the Spartans had wine upon their table, they were a very temperate people, and drank only a very little with each meal. To show the boys what a horrible thing drunkenness is, and the sure result of too much drinking, the old men sometimes gave them an object lesson.

They sent for one of the meanest Helots or slaves, and purposely gave him plenty of wine. He was encouraged to go on drinking until he sank on the floor in a drunken sleep. Then the old men would point him out to the boys, and explain to them that a man who has drunk too much is unworthy of the love or esteem of his fellow-creatures, and is in many ways worse than a beast.

The Spartan boys, thus early warned of the evils of drinking, were careful to take but very little wine, and to keep their heads quite clear, so that they might always be considered men, and might never disgrace themselves as they had seen the Helots do."
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Robert Francis

New York, USA

In your search you will run into two excellent books by Paul Cartledge, the fist called The "Spartans" and his latest called "Thermopylae". It came out last year and its a great piece for your motivational library.

Also anyone interested in the combat arts needs to learn these virtues as cadets at West Point and Midshipmen at Annapolis learn the Spartan codes. That's a Spartan Helmet on the West Point crest.

zand....
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Before you get too "enamored" of the Spartan "lifestyle", look up the "social" aspects of their culture.
Not that there's anything wrong with it.

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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Bill De Simone wrote:
Before you get too "enamored" of the Spartan "lifestyle", look up the "social" aspects of their culture.
Not that there's anything wrong with it.




I read a bit about it, and they seem to have some "interesting" views about open marriage and "mentoring", although it is implied that the "mentoring" is completely chaste. It seemed everything revolved around developing a society that was prepared for and excelled at warfare.
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