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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Reg Park-Impressive
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k38wood

Last night my son and I and good friends, Bill Hinbern and Ben Oldham had the chance
to attend a lecture in Cincinnati
that featured Mr. Universe legend,
Reg Park and Basketball's Oscar "the big O" Robertson...what an awesome
deal it was!(I had written a post about
this affair weeks ago but the mods
here evidently did not let it get
printed...) Reg gave a wonderful talk
...at 78 his mind is sharp as a tack
(and he's still very physically impressive)...he covered his career
in great detail and also had much
to say about training. I'm not a big
fan of bodybuilding(it seems he's not
either!) but I was greatly impressed by
this wise and gracious man. Usually,
when "wisdom" is given out by some
old BB champ I cringe...but Reg's
training wisdom was solid. As the
evening drew to a close I gave Reg a
copy of Ell Darden's new "old school"
book...he was fascinated. What a fine
fellow.
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Ellington Darden

Kim,

Thanks for that Reg Park update. I still remember his GREAT side rib-cage pose from the 1950s. Did he say anything about doing breathing squats and pullovers?

Ell

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k38wood

yes, he did, Ell. They had a screen
behind him for part of his talk
and were showing all the great "signature" photos from his career...and old, old Iron Man magazine
covers! It was a unique deal.
(Hinbern was swooning!)
He talked quite a bit about Grimek
and lots about training under very
adverse conditions(outside in his dad's
garden in England in winter! and in
some old un-heated shack lit with candles.)
He talked about training with Eder and
Melvin Wells among others...and really focused on wanting to be remembered as one of the
"strongest" bodybuilders. His training
advice was very sound...his focus was
always on "hard work"...and "drive".
But what stood out was his style...
Reg Park is a real gentleman.


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cmg

Thank you Kim. He competed before I could see him however from pictures he is quite massive and impressive.

Because he was Arnold's idol I assume he trains high volume.

Regards,

Ron
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medici

Spain

Those who've not seen Reg Park at his maturest still can: in the earlier 60s he starred in at least 2 Hercules films (like Reeves', Italian made). The man was massive. I suspect those films have been preserved in VHS and/or DVD format.
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Nate Dogg

Florida, USA

cmg wrote:
Because he was Arnold's idol I assume he trains high volume.

Regards,

Ron


What exactly is considered "high volume" to you HIT advocates?

Anything more than one set per exercise? I'm confused at some of your terminology when it comes to HVT (which I thought was a funny term).

I'm curious. As many people (natural, average genetics) make wonderful gains while not using HIT and by doing more than 1-2 sets per exercise.

Yes, I know I'm on a HIT discussion board. I've purchased Dr. Darden's new book and think it's great! It has helped clear up some questions I've had about HIT since I've never used it or understood how it should be used correctly (since there seem to be so many different types of HIT - many of which may be ineffective - i.e. Heavy Duty Training - way too low in volume and training).

I'm trying to understand it more, as I may actually use HIT in the near future, but just like many people misunderstand HIT, I think there are many HIT practioners that misunderstand "high volume training" (and what is considered high volume?).

Remember, there is no best training program. Everything works for a while.

I seriously doubt that many of the bodybuilders from way back in the day (before steroids) used HIT year round. In fact, I'm sure that they would have used different methods throughout the year, including high volume and low volume.

Sorry for the hi-jack.

I would be interested in knowing more about Reg Park's training and what he did back then and what he would prescribe now.
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Rich Fitter

New Jersey, USA

Park's strength is a large part of what created his mystique. He was not just a bodybuilder but a tremendously strong man.
With regards to what constitues HIT, I believe it is best defined as brief, abreviated workouts with an emphasis on effort. I realize that is a vague definition but most of my workout consist of one or two sets per exercise take to failure or near failure while others may do strictly one set only. The same can be said about sets per workout which I try to limit to 9-14.
What was the famous statement about pornography; "I cant tell you what it is but I know it when I see it." I think the same applies to HIT vs. HVT training.
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Charles Coulter

New York, USA

Here's nice clip of Park benching.

http://youtube.com/...h?v=ptB6SyXFO_4
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JONKILCOYNE

Florida, USA

Although with his experience he probably has tried everything under the sun, from what ive read or heard about Reg Park is that he made some of his best gains while using a whole body three day per week schedule, ala Steve Reeves type training, with maybe more volume.

Whether its true or not i dont know since much of what is printed about bodybuilders is garbage anyway, but this is what ive read about Mr. Park.
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Nate Dogg

Florida, USA

Rich Fitter wrote:
Park's strength is a large part of what created his mystique. He was not just a bodybuilder but a tremendously strong man.


And how much of that was genetic? ;)

With regards to what constitues HIT, I believe it is best defined as brief, abreviated workouts with an emphasis on effort.

That's a good definition, and it leaves it open to mean more than 1-2 sets per exercise.

Have you ever read Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik? It's a very good read with abbreviated training programs that use a variety of sets/reps and overall volume. However, they are still brief routines with an emphasis on effort.

I realize that is a vague definition but most of my workout consist of one or two sets per exercise take to failure or near failure while others may do strictly one set only. The same can be said about sets per workout which I try to limit to 9-14.

You can train more frequently yet still stay within 9-14 sets per workout. For example, I've done the following in the past:

Squat 3 x 3
Bench 3 x 3
Row 3 x 3

That's 9 total sets done with heavy weights, yet the workout was brief and intense and much effort was put forth. And sets were taken to or near failure. I did two more workouts similar to that later in the week but may have varied exercises, sets and reps.

It's just another way to do a "low-volume" workout in a different way (focusing on full-body movements done three times a week and a few assistance exercises done at the end of the session).

What was the famous statement about pornography; "I cant tell you what it is but I know it when I see it." I think the same applies to HIT vs. HVT training.

I see many people thinking of HVT as being 20-40 sets per workout and 2-4 hour long workouts. Most people do not train like that (unless they've been reading Flex and Muscle & Fitness for too long). And yes, I would agree that the above would be HVT.

In most cases, people use a moderate amount of volume and still keep it intense while keeping workouts to 30-60 minutes. But there are so many different ways to structure your training that it's hard to call any of that HVT.
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k38wood

ain't nothin' in strength training that's etched in stone(and that includes "high intensity training").
A few years ago when we owned Hammer Strength we put out a little informational journal
primarily for the people that we thought could be described as the
"high intensity network"... Originally
we titled the journal, "HIT" but
watching how some created an orthodoxy
around what could best be described
as a "direction"(a direction that had certain very solid foundation posts
grounded in known research and logical thought(...but still, just a "direction")) we changed the title
of the publication to, "Hard Training".
We felt that hard, focused work was the
real key to the "right direction"...
I don't know the specifics of Reg Park's training philosophy...but in
talking to him he focused on hard work,
smart work, "doing things the right way" and he spoke out against many
of the insane things that characterize
the "iron game" today. Apart from his
personal charm he had interesting
things to say. Under the mast-head
of HIT/Hard Training many times there
appeared a quote from "T.S."...the quote was, "...all things CAN yield
knowledge..." ... My son and my friends and myself gained from our
encounter with one of strength training's all time greats.



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Nate Dogg

Florida, USA

Thanks Kim. Good stuff.
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Rich Fitter

New Jersey, USA

Agreed. Thanks Kim. Its always great to hear about the legends of the sport and their training methods.
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Rich Fitter

New Jersey, USA

Nate Dogg wrote:
Rich Fitter wrote:
Park's strength is a large part of what created his mystique. He was not just a bodybuilder but a tremendously strong man.

And how much of that was genetic? ;)

With regards to what constitues HIT, I believe it is best defined as brief, abreviated workouts with an emphasis on effort.

That's a good definition, and it leaves it open to mean more than 1-2 sets per exercise.

Have you ever read Dinosaur Training by Brooks Kubik? It's a very good read with abbreviated training programs that use a variety of sets/reps and overall volume. However, they are still brief routines with an emphasis on effort.

I realize that is a vague definition but most of my workout consist of one or two sets per exercise take to failure or near failure while others may do strictly one set only. The same can be said about sets per workout which I try to limit to 9-14.

You can train more frequently yet still stay within 9-14 sets per workout. For example, I've done the following in the past:

Squat 3 x 3
Bench 3 x 3
Row 3 x 3

That's 9 total sets done with heavy weights, yet the workout was brief and intense and much effort was put forth. And sets were taken to or near failure. I did two more workouts similar to that later in the week but may have varied exercises, sets and reps.

It's just another way to do a "low-volume" workout in a different way (focusing on full-body movements done three times a week and a few assistance exercises done at the end of the session).

What was the famous statement about pornography; "I cant tell you what it is but I know it when I see it." I think the same applies to HIT vs. HVT training.

I see many people thinking of HVT as being 20-40 sets per workout and 2-4 hour long workouts. Most people do not train like that (unless they've been reading Flex and Muscle & Fitness for too long). And yes, I would agree that the above would be HVT.

In most cases, people use a moderate amount of volume and still keep it intense while keeping workouts to 30-60 minutes. But there are so many different ways to structure your training that it's hard to call any of that HVT.


Rereading my post, I wanted to clarify something. My own definition of HIT may conflict with anothers in that I often perform one set per exercise. I train on a split routine much of the year and average about 4 to 6 movements per workout for a total of 9-14 sets. For some this may be more or less, it just happens to work for me.
I have read Dinosaur Training and I loved it. I also read the Hammer Strength newsletter, Milo & Hardgainer. I have read everything by Stuart McRobert and John McCallum. Dr Darden's Nautilus Bodybuilding Book was the first book I read on bodybuilding back in the early 80s.

Over the past year I have tried to read Brian Johnston's manuals as well as Mike Lipowski's Pure Physique. The underlying theme with all of these to me, is less volume, more effort, excellent form and patience. To me that's the common threads of HIT.
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k38wood

one thing, Rich...there is a hidden
irony in all this. IF you really
focus on doing every rep "right" and
getting the most out of it...which means you're are training "hard" and
you are at the same time paying attention to form...and you squeeze out every quality rep you can do...and you are involved in some sort of system that
involves "progression"...THEN you can't do very much work.


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tc16

Nate dogg,

It would be worthwhile reading Arthur Jones Nautilus bulletins as well from this website:-

http://arthurjonesexercise.com...

Courtesy of Brian Johnston
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Nate Dogg

Florida, USA

tc16 wrote:
Nate dogg,

It would be worthwhile reading Arthur Jones Nautilus bulletins as well from this website:-

http://arthurjonesexercise.com...

Courtesy of Brian Johnston


Cool!

Thanks for that link. I didn't know they were available to read.
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Ciccio

k38wood wrote:
one thing, Rich...there is a hidden
irony in all this. IF you really
focus on doing every rep "right" and
getting the most out of it...which means you're are training "hard" and
you are at the same time paying attention to form...and you squeeze out every quality rep you can do...and you are involved in some sort of system that
involves "progression"...THEN you can't do very much work.




Very well said, Kim!
Exactly how I feel about the subject.

Franco


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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

Back in the early 80's, I was lucky enough to have trained with some of the greats at Joe Gold's WORLD GYM in Santa Monica.

Reg and his cousin Johnny Isaacs trained there as well as Arnold, Louie, Dave, Samir, and most every well known bodybuilder of that time you can think of.

I was also lucky enough to have always been there working legs when Arnold and Reg were working Calves.

So we were in a "rotation" Arnold, Me and then Reg, doing standing calves with 600#-700# for 10-15 reps a set for 10 sets, one right after the other.

I had to wait a half hour before driving home because my foot would shake when I pressed the clutch or brake pedals.

Reg was a great guy, and did have a real "class" and regalness about his carriage and persona.

Later Reg called me at a club I managed to get his nephew Greg Isaacs a job. The guy was a dynamo, and spent 1/2 of his day asking me question after question, after question.

His is now a quite famous fitness expert.

Reg's son, Jon,(jon jon) has a Personal training Gym here in West Los Angeles, WORLD PRIVATE FITNESS (I beleive) which has een there for many years.

He is everybit as much a great guy as his father.
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