MB Madaera
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Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
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Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
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Bob Marchesello
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Jeff Turner
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Jeanenne Darden
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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Abs and HIT
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tony12356

Massachusetts, USA

I need a little help i'm working out 3 times a week 8-12 reps 2- 3 sets then change to 20 reps other weeks and hitting abs same time but cannot get the six pack I'm happy about the gains with HIT and size but need my abs back I'm 43 and working out since I was 16.
thank you all in advance
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spud

Make sure you read both these articles a number of times.

http://www.drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=385712

http://www.drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=415445
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M Lipowski

New York, USA

tony12356 wrote:
I need a little help i'm working out 3 times a week 8-12 reps 2- 3 sets then change to 20 reps other weeks and hitting abs same time but cannot get the six pack I'm happy about the gains with HIT and size but need my abs back I'm 43 and working out since I was 16.
thank you all in advance


DIET, DIET, DIET...no weight training routine will get you a six pack. It'll help you develop the abdominal muscles but if there's a thick layer of fat laying over them they won't show.

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jrholt

Tennessee, USA

If one wants to see the ABS, he must lose body fat to a very low level. Most men need to be at 5% or below to see them. Ohters need to go lower than that (based on genetics).

Jeff
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tc16

Absolutely agree with all the above. Your never going to see your abs with a layer of fat above them, no matter how big they are. They only way is to lose that fat, check out the 'florida dreamin', article.
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tony12356

Massachusetts, USA

ok these articles were great thank you and everyone else my problem ice cream thanks again
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Paul25

Alright Tony,
The one thing that really helped me lose the last % of bf was drinking loads of plain cold water. Just doing that simple thing will transform your physique.
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tony12356

Massachusetts, USA

Paul25 wrote:
Alright Tony,
The one thing that really helped me lose the last % of bf was drinking loads of plain cold water. Just doing that simple thing will transform your physique.


I can do that thank you much
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

I once read that Franco Colombo did not do much ab work. Yet he'd almost always win the "best abs trophy" at bodybuilding contests. (Back when they awarded prizes for individual bodyparts. I think they should still do that, but maybe that's just me.)

He felt his abs got all the work they needed via deadlifts, tricep cable pushdowns and others. The rest simply came down to low bodyfat levels. I seem to recall him making the observation that Frank Zane would do hundreds of Roman Chair Situps, for results that were really no better than Franco's.

Personally, I do ZERO ab work, yet my abs look pretty good. I simply stay fairly lean, year-round.

The fitness industry and infomercials are so overly focused on ab training! They prey on the fact that most people think a "6-pack" comes from lots of ab work, rather than dietary measures.
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logicbdj

Ontario, CAN

There is a difference between good and best. Consider if Franco did work his abs and got them a half-inch thicker. Imagine if Zane did not train his abs and if they looked flatter.

I'm not suggesting that either instance is true, but I know for a fact that my abs are deeper etched (more relief/separation) when I train them as opposed to getting some benefit by way of other exercises. It's no different than comparing arms that get nothing but back work (chins, pulldowns and rows) as opposed to their development when targeted.
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SanDiego

I've found similar results... I require direct ab work for best results. Maybe if I had Franco's strength and was using his poundages, I wouldn't need to exercise the abs directly.
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

Everyone needs to do 1 set of crunches a workout wherever you believe the BS of not working abs or not.

Now that one set should be done using a 10sec up/5sec down cadence. And you thought super slow didn't work, here is an exercise that loves that speed.

And cut your fat, also.
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Gluteus Maximus

Abs, like any other muscle MUST be WORKER directly! Also, get lean to expose them like any other muscle. Most of becoming a bodybuilder is getting real skinny (lean) first, after that big muscles help too.
But skinny will get you some "wows"
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

Hi Brian,

I agree with you that heavy ab training will certainly optimize "deep etching" of the abs.

But a one inch increase in abs = a one inch increase in waistline = a somewhat less tapered look to physique.

Perhaps no big deal if you're going for a thicker type look, but as Vince Gironda noted (I believe the IART is generally favorably predisposed to his teachings?) direct ab work was largely to be avoided due to it's tendency to thicken the waistline.

Of course Vince advocated a more lean, symmetrical look which is not so popular in today's bodybuilding culture.

And while I won't say that many people won't benefit from direct ab work, I personally find that deadlifts make my abs sorer than any ab training I've ever done. And I've done all kinds.

I think it boils down to individual biomechanics and goals.

As a quick aside on Gironda's thinking on ab exercises - I really don't know what to think about his theory that ab work "shocks the system into producing less muscle building hormones." Something like that anyway.

I like a lot of Gironda's stuff (Gironda curls are the ONLY thing that makes my biceps sore the next day) but he seemed a bit out on left field on a few things. Like lowering a barbell to your neck?! Not in this lifetime!
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cmg

coachjeff wrote:
Hi Brian,

I agree with you that heavy ab training will certainly optimize "deep etching" of the abs.

But a one inch increase in abs = a one inch increase in waistline = a somewhat less tapered look to physique.

Perhaps no big deal if you're going for a thicker type look, but as Vince Gironda noted (I believe the IART is generally favorably predisposed to his teachings?) direct ab work was largely to be avoided due to it's tendency to thicken the waistline.

Of course Vince advocated a more lean, symmetrical look which is not so popular in today's bodybuilding culture.

And while I won't say that many people won't benefit from direct ab work, I personally find that deadlifts make my abs sorer than any ab training I've ever done. And I've done all kinds.

I think it boils down to individual biomechanics and goals.

As a quick aside on Gironda's thinking on ab exercises - I really don't know what to think about his theory that ab work "shocks the system into producing less muscle building hormones." Something like that anyway.

I like a lot of Gironda's stuff (Gironda curls are the ONLY thing that makes my biceps sore the next day) but he seemed a bit out on left field on a few things. Like lowering a barbell to your neck?! Not in this lifetime!



Jeff,

What are Gironda curls?

Regards,


Ron
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SanDiego

I believe they are "body-drag" curls... you curl by sliding the bar up your torso, rather than the arc that results from keeping your elbow stationary in a regular curl.
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logicbdj

Ontario, CAN

I haven't known many people with such incredible ab genetics that they developed so much that the waist looked bigger as a result, as opposed to complimenting the other over-developed muscles of the body.

For those few elite bodybuilders with thick waists and abs, such as Ron Tuefel (sp?), his waist would look larger than average because of its very shape and structure, and not because he developed thick abdominals - that thicken OUTWARD and not in width. I've worked my abs into the ground over the years, and they're not very thick - nor is my waist wide (relative to the rest of my physique... 34 inches at 208 pounds. It used to be 33 inches, but I've been doing a lot of rotary torso and low back work on MedX machines, which have a thickening effect when viewed from the side, but not from the front.
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

rtestes wrote:
Everyone needs to do 1 set of crunches a workout wherever you believe the BS of not working abs or not.

Now that one set should be done using a 10sec up/5sec down cadence. And you thought super slow didn't work, here is an exercise that loves that speed.

And cut your fat, also.


You had me until the last sentence.
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spud

When I have performed crunches and reverse crunches in the past, I have taken about 4 seconds to lift, 2 or 3 seconds squeezing as hard as I can in the contracted position, and then about about 4 seconds to lower myself back to the floor.

I don't count any of these seconds, as it detracts from my concentration and focus, but you get the idea. Moving slow and smooth will make your abs burn a lot quicker than flicking your torso up off the floor and then letting it crash back down again after spending a fraction of a second not really doing anything in what should be the contracted position.

Abs can be improved quite a bit in a relatively short time, but getting them to show in the first place (dietary discipline) is where the real hard work lies.

I'd be tempted to say that you shouldn't bother working your abs until you can clearly see them without flexing.
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