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Frank Zane at Age 64
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

Here's a recent photo of Frank Zane, who decided to get in great shape for 2006.

He says it's of course harder to hit a peak at 64, than when younger.

Apparently he plans to peak even better in 2007.
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tony12356

Massachusetts, USA

Did you read his workout plan.I hope it's HIT
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

It's light years from HIT. He trained 2 to 3 times per day. Did a thousand crunches a day, etc.
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medici

Spain

Frank's article is a long narrative, almost a personal journey, of what he's done over the recent months. Best to say that Frank's method is NEITHER HVT nor HIT, but pure unadultrated Zane! I've known him for 30 years and his training is always laboratory experimentation. He has backed away from big weights in favor of ligher/slower ones, and - as always - perfect concentrated form in movements
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

I was trying (unsuccessfully) to find a link of a first-hand account of someone who paid for one of Frank's 2-day personal courses ( at his home).

This gentleman described a couple of routines that Frank put him through that were much lower volume than he practiced in his competitive days. This man corraborated the perfect form part, along with some surpirisngly heavy weights for someone of FZ's age.
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

Zane knows how to show them.

Next, Dr. Darden will get in his old shape for a pose down with Zane. Has anyone from the original HIT group stayed in competition form, maybe Boyer Coe?

Seriously 65 isn't too late to stage a comeback. I do remember Dr. Darden felt anyone over 60 faced a uphill battle in some of his earlier books before he passed 60. That is an idea for a new book.
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Gluteus Maximus

65 yrs is too old to start to try to pack on the heavy muscles. at that age activities that promote longevity and fitness is prudent. excessive exercise isn't good at any age anyway, imo.

sure you can put on some muscles at 65+ and that's a good thing, but your "low fruit" has been picked already your hormones are waning. to bust a gut in gym trying to "pack as much on" is toward what end?

i don't believe that frank zane is 64 in that pic.

Staying fit, arobically and strength-wise, is a wise goal at any age but pushing oneself HARD at 65+ to make a "comeback" isn't wise, IMO. The harder you push it the greater the chance something will "br\eak"! :O

Train sesnibly

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JONKILCOYNE

Florida, USA

I saw a TV show called "The Gym" on Fit-Tv where they showed clips of a seminar that Zane did at their gym. In it he recommended that a person train three days a week. He said "Do Chest, Back, and Shoulders(Torso) on Monday, Arms on Wed, and Legs on Friday. I also saw a routine he recommended in Ironman that was a split that for two weeks three times a week, alternated with a routine that was a four way split four days per week, switching back and forth every two weeks. These recommendations are a VAST departure of what he originally did and recommended. I wonder who he was influenced by?
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tompuderbaugh

I too have met Frank several times over the years. He is a real gentleman.

His approach to training, however, has (at most times) been about as far away from HIT as you could get.

Still, it's hard to argue with his results. (I would guess that his type of very symetrical body is more appealing to 99.99% of the population than all of the recent "mass monsters" put together.)

But even after following his career all these years, I'm still at a loss to explain his results (he is pretty much old-school HVT).

Perhaps there really is something in the old saying that "it ALL works", at least to one degree or another, if you've got the proper genetics for building muscle.

Good training to all!
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cmg

At 64 years of age - do you think he may be on something? I saw pictures of him about 5 years ago - he looked just as lean however skinny. He now looks almost as big. At any age it's difficult but at 64 there's not many who can have good mass and cuts like that naturally.

Regards,

Ron
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Maybe it's the angle of the photo, but the left arm (his left) doesn't match the rest of his body. Bad photo, looks fake. I hope it's not. The recent photos of him don't quite match the above photo.
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cmg

His left arm looks bigger than it ever did - looks too big for his torso.

Regards,

Ron
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JimBryan

Florida, USA

Saw Frank several times over in Tampa. He trained at Harry Smith's. Harry looked as good as anyone back then. I trained off and on with Craig Whitehead when he came to Winter Haven but Craig's main Gym was Harry's. I used to travel often to train at Harry's.

Frank was much bigger then. He was always polite and friendly. I think he and his Wife lived in the same building as Craig. She was VERY pretty and worked out also. I suspect photo shop on that picture. Frank does look good though.

As Ell knows we had some top guys in BodyBuilding living and training in Florida at the time. Seems Tampa and Sarasota is where most were. We had Bob Harrington and Dennis Wood in Winter Haven at Al Christensen's. Both did well also.
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RyanWallace

Massachusetts, USA

It is nice to see that alot of these old school bodybuilders can live long enough to retire. Some of these new-school mass monstrers probably wont make it past 50.
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

cmg wrote:
His left arm looks bigger than it ever did - looks too big for his torso.

Regards,
Ron


From many photos I've seen, from the last 10 years or so, his arm size is one thing he's apparently worked hard to keep. His triceps were ALWAYS the most devloped muscles on his body.
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Gluteus Maximus

go to Frank's website to see what he looks like TODAY.
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medici

Spain

With regard to Frank's long term ability to stay in shape I believe more than just how he trains is at stake. First, his knowledge and implementation of nutrition is very advanced.

When we first met in the late 70s, I was surprised to meet someone else who'd read Roger Williams Biochemical Individuality - Frank's always been right in touch with the leading edge of science. And back then we were both reading and comparing notes in a newly emerging field today called "life-extension" and "anti-aging" - it wasn't even named in those days. But what was known was the nutritional deficiency disorders resulting in what are commonly mistaken as diseases that just sort of happen to you; secondly, work by a number of sports medicine scientists concerning overtraining being essentially an aging condition with respect to biomarkers in the early 80s further turned our attention. Frank's made excellent use of very cutting edge approaches to nutrients.

One the academic side, Christine Zane holds three master's degrees to Frank's two. His second was in behavioral psychology, done on the topic of light/sound entrainment - a methodology which enables development of so-called meditational like skills normally taking years or decades within far shorter amounts of time. His Mind-Muscle Machine is a solid contribution to gaining pathways to voluntary control of autonomic nervous system functions and capacities, including lowering those catabolic steroids (cortisols), while enhancing production of HGH, etc. Abundant literature on these phenomena occurs in peer reviewed publications for several decades now while hardly bearing notice in sports communities, at least in the USA.

Someone asked where he learned his split routine. As I recall, the late/great San Antonio, Texas, powerlifter Doug Young introduced him to three way splits in the late 1970s - in Hawai'i at a powerlifting contest Frank did the guest posing for. In those days it was Day 1, pulling muscles, Day 2 legs, Day 3 pushing muscles, Day 4 rest. As time went on Frank's rest days became two days, and sometimes one was inserted between workout days - in other words, more recuperation days. A function of aging? Not entirely.

It's seemed to me, but I'd have to ask him directly for the definitive answer - so this is speculative - that with the seventeen years in Palm Springs, a big disconnect from Venice/Santa Monica, and not competing, Frank was on to more experiments. In Palm Springs they owned a mansion or estate developed by actor Cary Grant, a world of privacy for an artist and a scientist. I've taken it that Frank discovered in the less stressful days after competition that he did well with less training, hence more intense training.

I said earlier that I'd deem his training The Zane Way, neither HIT or HVT. Going further, terms like HIT and HVT seem more like place holders than definitive concepts. Dr Darden's more recent writings, reflecting decades of research, seem to open HIT up to a wide spectrum of training choices rather than a narrow, tunnel vision focus. Maybe Zane has become HIT in the sense of Ell's The New HIT. Or close to it.

But you shouldn't listen to me on that one. I've never tolerated religion or politics very well since both can be so rigidly sectarian, defining reality as black and white, hence ignoring not only shades of gray but being woefully color blind at the same time. I'm seeing more indications of New HIT type approaches popping up all over the place. Even in the latest Flex mag - which I read in a waiting room quite by accident the other day, and was much surprised by.

So with Zane you have a very unique person whose multiphasic approach continues to leave no stone unturned. And when he's not training he makes Native American and Japanese flutes, plays blues harmonic and guitar, writes songs, and has his own band. Add to that a well balance, mature, and wise man.

While the debate still rages on about who was in better shape at the 80 Olympia, that is - Zane or Mentzer, there's no question that Zane has always been the far superior intellect of the two.
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JimBryan

Florida, USA

I'm sure Frank was doing three way splits long before the 70's. I was, in fact we all were. He was at Harry's several days a week and I don't think they were all full body. Splits were the thing in the 60's.
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Bill De Simone

New Jersey, USA

Great post. Not at all like most of the rest on this board.

They'll be coming after you with torches any minute now;)
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medici

Spain

JimBryan wrote:
I'm sure Frank was doing three way splits long before the 70's. I was, in fact we all were. He was at Harry's several days a week and I don't think they were all full body. Splits were the thing in the 60's.


What establishes that certainity, Jim? Split routines were all the rage from sometime in the fifties, it's true. However, the three way split Frank used from 79 onward was, in point of fact, new to him - learned from Doug Young. One result was that Frank competed heavier for both is last Olympia and several subsequent attempts after that. The training of that period had somewhat more of a powerlifting orientation to it as well, especially with rack deadlift partials from knee height (Young was one influence in this one, Jan Todd's exceptional traps another - I have a photo of her from that time doing a partial rack deadlift with over 1230 lbs).

Hope this note clarifies that not all split routines are the endurance contests verging on marathon training of the fifties and sixties. As I recall Frank's training at that time whittled sets down to three moves for three sets, a whopping nine sets/bodypart.
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ron33

Question for the guy's that knew Zane.When i lived in L.A. in late 70's early 80's ,some fellows that trained at the gym i went to claimed they knew Zane, and that his friend's called him Chemical Man,because he supposedly used so many to get cut.Is this true or a bunch of B.S.?
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Gluteus Maximus

http://www.midwestchristianbod...


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Raider22

Ohio, USA

2 weekends ago I was standing two feet away from Zane at the Arnold expo. He looked about 165lbs and not as muscular as in the picture posted. I think it is a bogus photo. He is still in great shape for any age.
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BF Bullpup

Massachusetts, USA

Gluteus Maximus wrote:
http://www.midwestchristianbod...


Nice try, G.M., but that photo is obviously bogus. Where are his HUGE triceps? ;-)
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RyanWallace

Massachusetts, USA

If my memory is correct most people report Mr. Zane to not be a large man throughout his career. I think he is one of those guys who when in "shape" and shirt off he looks muscular and with shirt on he looks thin.
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