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Eggs Question
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DrFist

Hey all I was reading the nutrition section of an average egg and it basically contains all the minerals and vitamins the body needs except Vitamin C which apparently chickens can make by themselves. Plus it's an excellent source of high quality protein.

I'm not suggesting an egg only diet or anything extreme but after noticing this I've been trying to increase my egg intake throughout the day. I don't know how guys can eat 10-12 at breakfast alone though? WTF I struggle to manage this much DAILY.

Right now my diet consists of:

Carbs: Rice, potatoes (sweet and normal)
Protein: Chicken and eggs
Fats: What I get from other foods and also fish oil.

I haven't been able to eat fruit or veggies due to drought problems over here and it doesn't look like I'll be able to for a good while.

How does my diet look? This is basically all I can eat right now due to the drought and my intolerance of lactose and gluten.
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Swedish Viking

California, USA

I eat anywhere from 8-24 daily. Sometimes just yolks, but mostly the whole thing. I drink them Rocky style or put them in smoothies.
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HeavyHitter32

Just be careful of the egg yolk and all of that cholesteral. You don't want to harden your arteries.
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Acerimmer1

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Just be careful of the egg yolk and all of that cholesteral. You don't want to harden your arteries.


Are eggs actually so bad for your colesterol? I have really low cholesterol myself if anything it could maybe do with a boost and I eat lots of scrambled eggs.
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

The average japanese person eats about 100 more eggs per year than the typical American, yet they have about the lowest level of heart disease in the world. Even the American Heart Association has backed off the demonization of eggs recently. Dietary intake of cholesterol is basically a non-issue. See the following.

www.thincs.org
http://www.thegreatcholesterol...

The second link may seem a bit "hypey" but the guy is well respected, and has written a great, well referenced book on this topic.

Oxidized cholesterol in processed foods can be a problem, but the real stuff is not. Omega 3 to omega 6 ratios are a much more important thing to focus on.
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marcrph

Portugal

Stay far, far away from powdered milk and eggs! Something else mankind has messed up!

http://www.westonaprice.org/...cnutrition.html
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

DrFist wrote:
How does my diet look? This is basically all I can eat right now due to the drought and my intolerance of lactose and gluten.


I would suggest brown rice and sweet potatoes. Both are lower glycemic than their white counterparts. Pasta actually isn't too bad on the glycemic index if you cook it al dente style. White potatoes will be lower glycemic if you refrigerate them after cooking.

Can't go wrong with chicken and eggs. Cholesterol is an important precursor to anabolic hormones and is not dangerous to most people, so keep eating them eggs! You can buy high omega-3 eggs if budget allows.

I strongly suggest avoiding most refined vegetable oils and the processed foods that contain them. Cheap vegetable oils are too high in inflammatory omega-6 fatty acids and are highly prone to oxidation, which generates free radicals in your body. Fish oil in moderation is good. Olive oil is good. A little butter isn't as bad as many would have you believe either. It's very chemically stable. Margarine on the other hand is sheer crap.
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coach-jeff

Louisiana, USA

marcrph wrote:
Stay far, far away from powdered milk and eggs! Something else mankind has messed up!

www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/pcnutrition.html


Glad to see another Weston Price Foundation fan. They do a lot of really good work. Though I believe they exaggerate the dangers of pesticides and vaccines. Mary Enig is a top notch lipids expert, and has done a lot toward exposing the myths of traditional fats like butter, etc.
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Swedish Viking

California, USA

Speaking of butter...sometimes i eat a half pound of un-pasteurized butter a day. Almost never less than a quarter pound.
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marcrph

Portugal

coachjeff wrote:
marcrph wrote:
Stay far, far away from powdered milk and eggs! Something else mankind has messed up!

www.westonaprice.org/basicnutrition/pcnutrition.html

Glad to see another Weston Price Foundation fan. They do a lot of really good work. Though I believe they exaggerate the dangers of pesticides and vaccines. Mary Enig is a top notch lipids expert, and has done a lot toward exposing the myths of traditional fats like butter, etc.


coachjeff,

Likewise! It warms my heart to see some brains on this forum also.

I'm am sick and tired of 95 % of these threads that apply to less than 1 % of the trainees here. In other words, there are a lot of wannabee bodybuilders here, but the truth is, they lack the genetics and circumstances to be such. You would think reality would sit in sometime before old age sits in. One can only hope.

Back on the subject, Mary Enig is an expert on lipids. She champions coconut oil in particular. T-Nation has had good reports on coconut oil. This forum has chosen to remain in the dark and accept the mainstream (manufacturing companies propaganda) thoughts on lipids.

I have brought this subject up many times HERE, but it seems to pass on deaf ears. IMO protein is less important than lipids in achieving a constant level of blood glucose levels. Furthermore, these lipids enhance testosterone levels. Coconut oil enhances metabolism by utilizing MCT's. Vitamin deficiencies result from low lipid diets.

http://atvb.ahajournals.org/...stract/18/6/977

http://www.nutrition4health.or...

Oxidized cholesterol is the next victim of modern manufacturing processes to get the "chopping axe," trans fats being the first. This will spell DOOM for protein powder mixes that contain such oxidized cholesterol, since the vast majority of consumers of such powders are health conscious. My motto is "Beware of what you are mixing."
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

HeavyHitter32 wrote:
Just be careful of the egg yolk and all of that cholesteral. You don't want to harden your arteries.


Acerimmer1 wrote:
Are eggs actually so bad for your colesterol? I have really low cholesterol myself if anything it could maybe do with a boost and I eat lots of scrambled eggs.


What HH is saying is a common misconception about cholesteral. It's actually saturated and trans that will raise your lipid levels the most.

If you are a reasonably active person, then cholesteral ingestion does not normally increase chol levels.

As with many things, the most important consideration with sat or trans fats, cholesteral intake and lipid levels, or any related matters is that you choose your parents very carefully.

Later,
Scott
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

marcrph wrote:
Stay far, far away from powdered milk and eggs! Something else mankind has messed up!


This statement requires a bit of clarification: Stay away from powdered milk and powdered eggs
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

marcrph wrote:

http://www.nutrition4health.or...

Oxidized cholesterol is the next victim of modern manufacturing processes to get the "chopping axe," trans fats being the first.


Hey Marc,

That NOHA article says "Cholesterol in boiled eggs, fresh meat, and seafood is harmless when accompanied by vitamins C, E, beta carotene, and a healthy diet"

There's an implication there that preparing eggs by means other than boiling may not be as healthy. Have you read anything on this issue?
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

DrFist wrote:
Hey all I was reading the nutrition section of an average egg and it basically contains all the minerals and vitamins the body needs except Vitamin C which apparently chickens can make by themselves. Plus it's an excellent source of high quality protein.


I read once about an acronym for the perfect simple diet. To my recollection, the acronym was A_E.

A and E stand for Apples and Eggs, but I can't remember what the third element and middle letter are. Anyone?

B - Broccoli?
C - Cruciferous Veggies?
L - Legumes?
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marcrph

Portugal

simon-hecubus wrote:
marcrph wrote:
Stay far, far away from powdered milk and eggs! Something else mankind has messed up!

This statement requires a bit of clarification: Stay away from powdered milk and powdered eggs


Thanks alot!
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DrFist

Well it's not powdered eggs, it's just the normal run of the mill egg protein powder. Same stuff as whey or whatever.
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marcrph

Portugal

DrFist wrote:
Well it's not powdered eggs, it's just the normal run of the mill egg protein powder. Same stuff as whey or whatever.


DrFist,

Check the ingredient list. If your powdered milk & egg protein contains cholesterol, chances are the powder is a good source of oxidized cholesterol. If you must supplement your protein needs, pick a protein powder with 0 (ZERO) cholesterol in the ingredients list.
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marcrph

Portugal

Something Joe Weider does not want to get out into general knowledge!


http://en.wikipedia.org/...i/Powdered_milk
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marcrph

Portugal

simon-hecubus wrote:
marcrph wrote:

http://www.nutrition4health.or...

Oxidized cholesterol is the next victim of modern manufacturing processes to get the "chopping axe," trans fats being the first.

Hey Marc,

That NOHA article says "Cholesterol in boiled eggs, fresh meat, and seafood is harmless when accompanied by vitamins C, E, beta carotene, and a healthy diet"

There's an implication there that preparing eggs by means other than boiling may not be as healthy. Have you read anything on this issue?


http://www.mercola.com/...te_proteins.htm
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marcrph

Portugal

simon-hecubus wrote:
marcrph wrote:

http://www.nutrition4health.or...

Oxidized cholesterol is the next victim of modern manufacturing processes to get the "chopping axe," trans fats being the first.

Hey Marc,

That NOHA article says "Cholesterol in boiled eggs, fresh meat, and seafood is harmless when accompanied by vitamins C, E, beta carotene, and a healthy diet"

There's an implication there that preparing eggs by means other than boiling may not be as healthy. Have you read anything on this issue?


http://www.mercola.com/...ed_proteins.htm
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Ah, if only there were a dietary means to stop hair loss...
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simon-hecubus

Texas, USA

Seriously, I guess sunny-side cooked at low temps is a good compromise.
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DrFist

Well this is the ingredient list of where I buy my egg powder from:

http://www.myopure.com.au/...NutritionalInfo
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marcrph

Portugal

simon-hecubus wrote:
Seriously, I guess sunny-side cooked at low temps is a good compromise.


http://www.jrussellshealth.com/...holesterol.html
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Gluteus Maximus

1)The effect of ingestion of egg on serum lipid profile in healthy young free-living subjects.

Department of Physiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi-110 029.

Egg is a major source of dietary cholesterol. Previous studies on the effect of egg on serum lipid profile have given conflicting results. Further, the serum lipid response to egg shows marked individual variation. Since the variation is at least partly genetically determined, and the response depends partly on the overall diet, studies on different ethnic groups are important. There is hardly any study on the subject available on Indians. In the present investigation, eighteen healthy young volunteers (7 male, 11 female) on a lacto-vegetarian diet were given one boiled egg per day for 8 wk in a randomized controlled cross-over study. Compared to the values obtained after 8 wk of egg-free period, the mean serum total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, total cholesterol/HDL ratio, VLDL cholesterol and triglycerides were not significantly different after 8 wk of egg consumption. However, the serum total cholesterol after 4 wk of egg consumption was significantly higher than the control values. Further, seven subjects out of 18 had an appreciable elevation of serum total cholesterol or LDL cholesterol, or both, after 8 wk of egg consumption. The study suggests that in young healthy Indian subjects on a vegetarian diet, consuming one egg per day raises serum cholesterol levels at 4 wk but in the majority baseline values are restored by 8 wk. However, some hyper-responders continue to have elevated serum cholesterol even at 8 wk. Knowing the response of an individual may be important before making egg consumption a regular habit.

2)The effect of ingestion of egg on the serum lipid profile of healthy young Indians.

Department of Physiology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi-110 029.

Thirty four healthy young volunteers (22 men, 12 women; age 25.7 +/- 5.8 years; BMI 20.8 +/- 2.3 kg/m2) participated in a randomized controlled cross-over trial on the effect of consuming one boiled egg every day for 8 wk on the serum lipid profile. The only significant change after 8 wk of egg consumption was an elevation of the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio. However, scrutiny of individual responses revealed that twelve of the subjects (10 men, 2 women) had a greater than 15% rise in the LDL cholesterol level after 8 wk of egg consumption. These subjects, considered hyperresponders, showed significant increases (P < 0.025) at both 4 wk and 8 wk after egg consumption in total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels, and at 8 wk in total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol ratio. The remaining 22 hyporesponders showed no change in any of the variables measured at 4 wk or 8 wk after egg consumption. In view of the high nutritional value of eggs, a blanket ban on eggs is not justified. However, since up to one-third of the population may be hyperresponders, knowing the response of an individual is important before making the egg a regular item of the diet.

3)Egg consumption and high-density-lipoprotein cholesterol. RESULTS. After 6 weeks of extra egg consumption serum HDL cholesterol increased by 10% (P < 0.05) and total cholesterol increased 4% (P < 0.05),

4) Plasma lipids of vegetarian and nonvegetarian males: effects of egg consumption. Total fat intake, however, appeared to exert an important influence upon plasma lipid levels within the vegetarian group. Total mean cholesterol and triglyceride levels were 11 and 21% lower and mean high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were 14% higher in low-fat vegetarians (23 to 33% kcal from fat) compared to high-fat vegetarians (35 to 48% kcal from fat). The similarity in lipid profiles between vegetarians and nonvegetarians may be partially explained by the relatively high fat intake (36.6%, mean) in the vegetarian subpopulation, and by the careful matching of vegetarians to nonvegetarians.


Eggs have lots of cholesterol and saturated fat, and have the potential to greatly worsen your cholesterol levels. Are YOU a "hyperresponder"? How do you know?

Why risk it? Whether you choose to ignore the large body of GOOD evidence that associates dietary cholesterol and fat with CVD is your choice, for me I'm going to place my bet with the SCIENCE.


On the other hand:

1)Effect of a 10-day animal fat-free diet on cholesterol and glucose serum levels, blood pressure and body weight in 50-year-old volunteers

Cholesterol decreased in blood serum from 4.9 to 4.3 mmol/l (11%--p < 0.01), blood glucose decreased from 4.2 to 3.3 mmol/l (p < 0.05), blood pressure systolic from 121.5 to 117.4 mm Hg (p < 0.01) and diastolic from 76.5 to 73.8 mm Hg (p < 0.05), body weight was not significantly changed. Our results showed, that 10-days lasting stay containing vegetarian diet and physical activity decreased the risk factors of cardiovascular diseases in 50 years-old volunteers.

2)Elimination of meat, fish, and derived products from the Spanish-Mediterranean diet: effect on the plasma lipid profile.

The effect of eliminating all animal (meat and fish) products except eggs and milk products from the current Spanish-Mediterranean diet was studied in 14 healthy subjects. This dietary manipulation decreased saturated and monounsaturated fat, protein, and cholesterol intakes. During the 2-month intervention period, a decrease in total plasma cholesterol concentrations (4.53 +/- 0.13 vs. 4.29 +/- 0.13 mmol/l, p < 0.05) was observed, mostly as a result of decreased high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (1.66 +/- 0.08 vs. 1.47 +/- 0.08 mmol/l, p < 0.05). The decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (2.51 +/- 0.15 vs. 2.43 +/- 0.13 mmol/l) did not reach statistical significance. Nevertheless, there was a significant association between the decrease in cholesterol intake and the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels (r = 0.719, p < 0.01). The decrease in protein intake was also correlated with the decrease in total cholesterol levels (r = 0.629, p < 0.05). Body weight and lean body mass were not modified during the study. Maximal aerobic power and maximal oxygen consumption were not significantly affected by the diet manipulation. In conclusion: a 2-month change from the current Spanish-Mediterranean diet to an ovolactovegetarian diet in young healthy persons decreases total plasma cholesterol levels, but mainly due to a decrease in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels.


What's in an egg?? SPINACH has 37 TIMES more Lutein+Zeaxanthin than egg. And 100% less fat and cholesterol! Equal portions eggs have at least SEVEN TIMES more calories.

No thanks, personally my egg eating days are long over.
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