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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Pre-Overtraining Signals
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Acerimmer1

I think this is worth discussing. Has anybody noticed any pre-overtraining signals. For example when I start to feel slightly edgey throughout the day then I'm usually pushing a little too hard, or have gone too long without a rest.
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gatorman

Alabama, USA

I am just the opposite. When I don't get too train enough or have to miss a workout I become like a caged animal.
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Yes

For me it's a clear signal when I need to sleep in the middle of the day. Another hint could be if I can't sleep more than 5 hours at a time.
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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

If I'm starting to feel a bit run down or just lack motivation to train, and everything else is fine (diet, sleep, etc.) then I back off for a bit.
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Acerimmer1

Yes wrote:
For me it's a clear signal when I need to sleep in the middle of the day. Another hint could be if I can't sleep more than 5 hours at a time.


This is a signal of acute overtraining. I'm talking about how you feel BEFORE you are actually overtrained. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure (I think I heard that saying on this forum).
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Yes

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Yes wrote:
For me it's a clear signal when I need to sleep in the middle of the day. Another hint could be if I can't sleep more than 5 hours at a time.

This is a signal of acute overtraining. I'm talking about how you feel BEFORE you are actually overtrained. An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure (I think I heard that saying on this forum).



Then I must be very out of tune with my body because this is one of the first things I notice. Sometimes I start to feel a bit run down and a lack of motivation, but that's unusual.
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Acerimmer1

gatorman wrote:
I am just the opposite. When I don't get too train enough or have to miss a workout I become like a caged animal.


IMO you're probably not any different.

You're either exaggerating a different but similar feeling. In which case I know what you mean.

Or you are already in a state of pre-overtraining in which upregulated adrenal output is fuelling exercise addiction. In which case I also know what you mean.
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Acerimmer1

Yes wrote:
Then I must be very out of tune with my body because this is one of the first things I notice. Sometimes I start to feel a bit run down and a lack of motivation, but that's unusual.


Interesting. When was the last time you had a week or ten days off?
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Acerimmer1

Drew Baye wrote:
If I'm starting to feel a bit run down or just lack motivation to train, and everything else is fine (diet, sleep, etc.) then I back off for a bit.


I believe that this will keep you making gains. But I think that the better gains are to be made further back from this line. I suppose the real issue is how much of your stress is training related.

If you are otherwise not particularly stressed then IMO just feeling on edge a bit stressed is good enough reason to back off. Because you can still do enough to promote gains without getting even slightly overtrained. If however you have alot of outside stress you will need to move into this pre-overtrained zone in order to make good gains, I suppose some people might be so stressed they are at times in this area before they even pick up a weight?

It's all relative. IMO if you are even slightly edgy, and if you've not had a week off in the last 6 weeks then have one. Obviously you cannot afford to take much more time off regularly without a good reason although I have made excellent gains myself with a 2 weeks on two weeks off system (after a layoff).

IMO you really need to watch out for, morning headaches. Mood changes, and bloated hands and feet, which can represent adrenal burnout.
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Yes

Acerimmer1 wrote:
Yes wrote:
Then I must be very out of tune with my body because this is one of the first things I notice. Sometimes I start to feel a bit run down and a lack of motivation, but that's unusual.


Interesting. When was the last time you had a week or ten days off?

Not that long ago, 2 or 3 weeks perhaps. I also regularly take one or two extra days off whenever I feel like it. Usually I don't train unless I feel really motivated and ready to give 110%, so I don't mind putting in a little extra rest.

Although I should add that one of the things I have learned recently is that I have been training a little too much, or a little too hard. But I don't think i've been seriously overtrained.
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Crotalus

Before JREPS when I used to record everything, I would see signs a week or so away ; not as many reps or felt weak in a certain exercise , etc.

But I'd feel great, right up to the day before the overtraining hit me - then I'd wake up and feel like I was run over by a truck.

That happened to me last Tues. ; woke up at my usual 5 am and immediately knew I wasn't training for the next few days. I skipped training until Saturday.
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k38wood

just an observation: this thread
is extremely wifty... just the kind of
wifty-ness that drives people from
posting and participating on this
forum. "pre-overtraining edgy-ness"? give me a break. High intensity
training usually isn't popular because
it is too tough...

IT IS "smart training
for those tough enough to do it"...
The oh-so-sensitive posters here
are embarrassing. Getting stale?
Take a day off... Big deal.
Hard training calls for tough minds...
Check the feelings...go to work.


("ace rimmer": if this forum were done
right everyone would have to use
their real name...your fake name here
is a bit much...and a little too
much to take seriously...please
cut the hidden messages...use your real name.)

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Drew Baye

Florida, USA

Acerimmer1 wrote:

I believe that this will keep you making gains. But I think that the better gains are to be made further back from this line. I suppose the real issue is how much of your stress is training related.


Most of the stress is not training related, and a good deal of it is due to getting only 6 or 7 hours of sleep, when I function much better when I regularly get 8.
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NATUREBOY

I take a week off training each time I fail to do MORE REPS or lift MORE WEIGHT than I did last time.
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k38wood

Arthur Jones used to say that there
"isn't enough in body-building to
sustain a man..." of course, what he was
talking about was having "a life"(in
the sense of "get a life")...and NOT
being a fanatic about your training
to the degree that you are fragile
and too self-conscious. The posts on
this thread are certainly posts of
men who spend too much time
"thinking about it"... you gotta be
tougher, guys.

High intensity weight
training is the stuff of very hard
work...not worrying over "signals".
HIT should be linked to mental toughness. Your training should be
important... but just a small part
of your life.



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