MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Tougher

Alberta, CAN

I was on my way to work the other day and a question popped into my head. How does someone's physical lifestyle, ie non exercise activities, affect their bodybuilding?

Let's use a made up subject: Joe. In one life Joe sits behind a computer all day and in another life he is a construction worker, lifting bricks, wood, tools, etc all day.

Now, apart from this difference, everything else is equal. They both train 2 - 3 times per week, 8 - 10 exercises, one set per exercise, their diets are adequate, they get enough sleep, etc.

How do you think this vast difference in physical activity, not specifically done for exercise (non exercise activities) would affect things? The construction working Joe is definitely getting a higher volume of workload, even if it isn't in the strict form of bench press, leg extension, etc.

Is one lifestyle better for bodybuilding than the other, or is there a balance somewhere in between? Should someone who sits behind a desk all day do more in the gym in the way of sets/exercises? Or should they stay with the 1 set for 8 - 10 exercises, 3x per week and be grateful for the recovery time?

Ben
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tony12356

Massachusetts, USA

I'm a landscaper do HIT 3 times a week 1-2 exercies per bodypart but lift heavy barrels of grass mulch etc this does not effect my workouts great question for this forum
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marcrph

Portugal

Your training should be beneficial for a PRODUCTIVE life-style.

HIT training is a small part of a PRODUCTIVE life-style.

Marc
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ron33

I know when i was climbing all day and lifting heavy objects, i had a lot more strength and endurance.even though in the summer when it was real hot ,someday's i would be totally exhausted from work and did'nt feel much like training .i would do a few quick sets and be gone.
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Tougher

Alberta, CAN

Tony, your reply is right where I'm asking about. You're doing 1 - 2 sets per body, 3x per week, on top of work, and from what I read, your work is pretty physically demanding. Do you feel as though you would have better, worse, or the same muscle building results if you spent those days resting?

Here's why I ask:

If you feel as though you're getting better results, then wouldn't it be better for someone with a sedentary lifestyle to add a little volume?

If you feel as though you're getting worse or the same results, then someone with a sedentary lifestyle wouldn't need to worry too much, right?

Again, refering to my first post, by sedentary lifestyle, I mean something like working at a computer all day at work.

Disclaimer: When I mentioned volume above, don't get me wrong. I'm only talking about relatively small increases like 2 sets instead of 1, etc., not 5 sets of 5 exersices for bi's. I'm past the need to be in the gym 2 hrs, 5 days per week, and I totally agree that it needs to be part of your life, not you life.

The reason for this post is that my job involves a lot of sitting or low impact walking and not a whole lot of heavy lifting.

Ben
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Ciccio

Tougher wrote:
I was on my way to work the other day and a question popped into my head. How does someone's physical lifestyle, ie non exercise activities, affect their bodybuilding?

Let's use a made up subject: Joe. In one life Joe sits behind a computer all day and in another life he is a construction worker, lifting bricks, wood, tools, etc all day.

Now, apart from this difference, everything else is equal. They both train 2 - 3 times per week, 8 - 10 exercises, one set per exercise, their diets are adequate, they get enough sleep, etc.

How do you think this vast difference in physical activity, not specifically done for exercise (non exercise activities) would affect things? The construction working Joe is definitely getting a higher volume of workload, even if it isn't in the strict form of bench press, leg extension, etc.

Is one lifestyle better for bodybuilding than the other, or is there a balance somewhere in between? Should someone who sits behind a desk all day do more in the gym in the way of sets/exercises? Or should they stay with the 1 set for 8 - 10 exercises, 3x per week and be grateful for the recovery time?

Ben


Given that we speak about the very same average(!) joe, I would say the sedendary one shouldn't do more but the active one less (like only train 2 x week, do only 7 sets instead of 10, ...).

Franco


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tony12356

Massachusetts, USA

Tougher wrote:
Tony, your reply is right where I'm asking about. You're doing 1 - 2 sets per body, 3x per week, on top of work, and from what I read, your work is pretty physically demanding. Do you feel as though you would have better, worse, or the same muscle building results if you spent those days resting?

Here's why I ask:

If you feel as though you're getting better results, then wouldn't it be better for someone with a sedentary lifestyle to add a little volume?

If you feel as though you're getting worse or the same results, then someone with a sedentary lifestyle wouldn't need to worry too much, right?

Again, refering to my first post, by sedentary lifestyle, I mean something like working at a computer all day at work.

Disclaimer: When I mentioned volume above, don't get me wrong. I'm only talking about relatively small increases like 2 sets instead of 1, etc., not 5 sets of 5 exersices for bi's. I'm past the need to be in the gym 2 hrs, 5 days per week, and I totally agree that it needs to be part of your life, not you life.

The reason for this post is that my job involves a lot of sitting or low impact walking and not a whole lot of heavy lifting.

Ben


good to hear from you I feel that the work I do makes me stronger and bigger I still hit the workouts with all I have being 43 I thinks and 2 heart surgeys thats pretty good.On your next ques.I think if you sit in front of a computer all day you should go all out more then someone like me that lifts and runs around all day.
Tony
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DScott

I would not say to add volume to the strength workout but adding daily activity would benefit someone with a less active lifestyle.
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tony12356

Massachusetts, USA

very true
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