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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Neck Strengthening?
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DrFist

What exercises would you guys recommend? I asked at my uni gym and they said they don't have any equipment for the neck. What type of stuff can I do at home? I'm doing it primarily for boxing.
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DrFist

Bump
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davise

Without a 4 way neck I would do neck curls with a plate or dumbbell on your forehead (hanging your head off a bench) and shrugs. Those plus doing any kind of heavy pulling should be enough.
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marcrph

Portugal

Look up neck isometrics.

Dr. Stuart McGill recommends these in the "Ultimate Back Fitness And Performance"
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Growl

Dr.Fist,
I wrote the following in another thread. It works for me.

"I'm only giving instructions based on what I do and I'm not telling anybody else that it is healthy.

Get an exercise ball that we all make fun of. I have one that looks like a giant HOHO. Have it the same height or higher than your head, so that you can press into it with your forehead. Use a towel for comfort between you and said ball. Press into it with your forehead slowly and repeat reps until neck is very warmed up. Now press into it as hard as you safely can and hold as long as you safely can. The ball will press back.

Hopefully you can work up to at least one minute sets that leave your muscles worked well. You can work all four sides and get a very good neck workout in almost any range you want in increments of 2-6 inches, depending on ball and resistance it offers. If you are creative, you can make it happen. Be sure ball or giant HOHO will not move out from under you while training.

I have mine VERY secure. Reps and holds should all be slowly pushed into and then you can work up to pressing pretty hard. I only work the range right around the natural upright position and it feels really good when I'm done. Very warm and pumped and healthy.

I hope it works well for others and my explanation was clear. I'm going on no sleep and dieting also."

Jeff
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DrFist

hey guys, are there any other neck exercises i can do? is it worth buying equipment to train the neck?
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Michael Petrella

Ontario, CAN

I have a Nautilus 4-way neck machine for sale. Not sure where you are located.
The only reason I am selling it is because I bought a brand new MEDX 4 - way Neck. Strengthening the neck is one of the most important things an athlete can do. Nothing makes it as easy and productive as a properly designed 4-way neck machine.

Michael
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marcrph

Portugal

I still like resistance band neck isometrics.
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michael

http://www.drdarden.com/...411888&pageNo=0

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perrymk

I use a neck harness. I occasionally add shrugs and have tried but didn't like bridging.
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marcrph

Portugal

I wonder if the rotary neck is safe?

For the same reasons the rotary torso is unsafe.
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indexit

rotary neck = unknown stroke risk
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SB2006

The rotary torso machine is not unsafe. Using it (or any other equipment) improperly is unsafe.
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marcrph

Portugal

SB2006 wrote:
The rotary torso machine is not unsafe. Using it (or any other equipment) improperly is unsafe.


Yes it is
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marcrph

Portugal

indexit wrote:
rotary neck = unknown stroke risk


Could you elaborate?
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indexit

marcrph wrote:
indexit wrote:
rotary neck = unknown stroke risk

Could you elaborate?


Hi Marcrph,

David Harvey a super slow master who later became a huge follower of Arthur Jones pointed this possible issue out to me about ten years ago.

David explained that the vertebral artery can potentially be damaged during rotation of the head. David pointed out that chiropractic neck adjustment involving rotation increase the risk of stroke. Whether or not that risk is negligible relative to the value of an adjustment is up for debate. I met a middle age women who was interested in training with me who claimed that she had a stroke because of a neck adjustment. For her the risk was not negligible.

The issue with the neck rotation machine is very few people have ever done neck rotation under progressive loads over time. As far as I know there is no research into stroke risk and exercise neck rotation, so at this point the risk level is unknown. Not many people have ever even done this exercise.

Now someone can chime in that they have trained hundreds of people on exercise neck rotation without incident and that may be true. The threshold of risk may be below that level.

I don't think we really know the risks or what group of people it might be risky for. Why chance it?

For myself this is an exercise I no longer choose to do or recommend to people. Rehab with light loads may be a different situation.

http://www.quackwatch.com/...hirostroke.html

thanks,

jeff


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southbeach

My 5'10" buddy had a big neck (for his size) and he attributed that to his deadlifting. Even though like me he is dyed- in- the- wool isolation all the way.

He tested out on MedX very strong in upper quintiles. Me, on the other hand, i have a pencil thin geek neck despite machine neck work. Don't get me wrong my neck is larger than if i didn't work it but still thin. My strength tested out just above avg.

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marcrph

Portugal

indexit wrote:
marcrph wrote:
indexit wrote:
rotary neck = unknown stroke risk

Could you elaborate?

Hi Marcrph,

David Harvey a super slow master who later became a huge follower of Arthur Jones pointed this possible issue out to me about ten years ago.

David explained that the vertebral artery can potentially be damaged during rotation of the head. David pointed out that chiropractic neck adjustment involving rotation increase the risk of stroke. Whether or not that risk is negligible relative to the value of an adjustment is up for debate. I met a middle age women who was interested in training with me who claimed that she had a stroke because of a neck adjustment. For her the risk was not negligible.

The issue with the neck rotation machine is very few people have ever done neck rotation under progressive loads over time. As far as I know there is no research into stroke risk and exercise neck rotation, so at this point the risk level is unknown. Not many people have ever even done this exercise.

Now someone can chime in that they have trained hundreds of people on exercise neck rotation without incident and that may be true. The threshold of risk may be below that level.

I don't think we really know the risks or what group of people it might be risky for. Why chance it?

For myself this is an exercise I no longer choose to do or recommend to people. Rehab with light loads may be a different situation.

http://www.quackwatch.com/...hirostroke.html

thanks,

jeff




Jeff,

Amazing what a transition of knowledge does...for all too long HIT has refused a transition of any knowledge.

Thanks for that information.

Dr. Stuart McGill has consistently spoken out about the dangers of rotational exercises for the torso when performing these rotation machines. Very high forces are encountered when engaging in these particular exercises. Safer forms of resistance exercises for the torso muscles can be found. There are very few degrees of movement available. The neck on the other hand can turn with ease, but are the forces encountered when using extra resistance destructive to the neck vertebra?

From experience, if the neck has cricks, all else is miserable.

I've found resistance bands (Woody's) an excellent choice for the neck muscles used in an isometric manner. I also found Hutchins isometric recommendations not reasonable. One can do rotational (twists) with these resistance bands also, but I hesitate due to possibly damaging the vertebra in this delicate area.

I noticed no football coach uses rotational exercises, including an ex-Michigan coach. Wonder why?
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jn6047

I am also among those who do not see the risk to reward benefit of rotary neck exercise. As a prehospital care worker, I saw plenty of spinal injuries. The worst were always those who dive into shallow water head first. Try to break someones neck by twisting on their head, almost impossible unless you find a way to brace their shoulders first. I think that the water gives the body enough stability for the fractures to occur. Who knows...
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marcrph

Portugal

jn6047 wrote:
I am also among those who do not see the risk to reward benefit of rotary neck exercise. As a prehospital care worker, I saw plenty of spinal injuries. The worst were always those who dive into shallow water head first. Try to break someones neck by twisting on their head, almost impossible unless you find a way to brace their shoulders first. I think that the water gives the body enough stability for the fractures to occur. Who knows...


JFYI, steroids don't fix injuries to the neck vertebra.
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Acerimmer1

For bodybuilding these muscles don't look right when they are trained intensely with these direct exercises. There is a picture of Dr D online here when his neck was at it's best while technically impressive I still think it looked quite awful!

So for bodybuilding I just don't see any benefit at all.
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Bill Sekerak

California, USA

marcrph wrote:
indexit wrote:
marcrph wrote:
indexit wrote:
rotary neck = unknown stroke risk

Could you elaborate?

Hi Marcrph,

David Harvey a super slow master who later became a huge follower of Arthur Jones pointed this possible issue out to me about ten years ago.

David explained that the vertebral artery can potentially be damaged during rotation of the head. David pointed out that chiropractic neck adjustment involving rotation increase the risk of stroke. Whether or not that risk is negligible relative to the value of an adjustment is up for debate. I met a middle age women who was interested in training with me who claimed that she had a stroke because of a neck adjustment. For her the risk was not negligible.

The issue with the neck rotation machine is very few people have ever done neck rotation under progressive loads over time. As far as I know there is no research into stroke risk and exercise neck rotation, so at this point the risk level is unknown. Not many people have ever even done this exercise.

Now someone can chime in that they have trained hundreds of people on exercise neck rotation without incident and that may be true. The threshold of risk may be below that level.

I don't think we really know the risks or what group of people it might be risky for. Why chance it?

For myself this is an exercise I no longer choose to do or recommend to people. Rehab with light loads may be a different situation.

http://www.quackwatch.com/...hirostroke.html

thanks,

jeff




Jeff,

Amazing what a transition of knowledge does...for all too long HIT has refused a transition of any knowledge.

Thanks for that information.

Dr. Stuart McGill has consistently spoken out about the dangers of rotational exercises for the torso when performing these rotation machines. Very high forces are encountered when engaging in these particular exercises. Safer forms of resistance exercises for the torso muscles can be found. There are very few degrees of movement available. The neck on the other hand can turn with ease, but are the forces encountered when using extra resistance destructive to the neck vertebra?

From experience, if the neck has cricks, all else is miserable.

I've found resistance bands (Woody's) an excellent choice for the neck muscles used in an isometric manner. I also found Hutchins isometric recommendations not reasonable. One can do rotational (twists) with these resistance bands also, but I hesitate due to possibly damaging the vertebra in this delicate area.

I noticed no football coach uses rotational exercises, including an ex-Michigan coach. Wonder why?


Maybe they are just ignorant.
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jn6047

marcrph wrote:
jn6047 wrote:
I am also among those who do not see the risk to reward benefit of rotary neck exercise. As a prehospital care worker, I saw plenty of spinal injuries. The worst were always those who dive into shallow water head first. Try to break someones neck by twisting on their head, almost impossible unless you find a way to brace their shoulders first. I think that the water gives the body enough stability for the fractures to occur. Who knows...


JFYI, steroids don't fix injuries to the neck vertebra.


Intentionally trying to start shit with me does nothing for neck vertebrae either.


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marcrph

Portugal

Bill Sekerak wrote:

Maybe they are just ignorant.


This is Gittleson's idea of training the neck.

http://info.rogersathletic.com/...ay-Neck-Machine

No mention of rotation.

Ignorant?
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marcrph

Portugal

jn6047 wrote:
marcrph wrote:
jn6047 wrote:
I am also among those who do not see the risk to reward benefit of rotary neck exercise. As a prehospital care worker, I saw plenty of spinal injuries. The worst were always those who dive into shallow water head first. Try to break someones neck by twisting on their head, almost impossible unless you find a way to brace their shoulders first. I think that the water gives the body enough stability for the fractures to occur. Who knows...


JFYI, steroids don't fix injuries to the neck vertebra.

Intentionally trying to start shit with me does nothing for neck vertebrae either.




But it does let everyone know about drug pushing ideas of some who post here.
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