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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Strength After Layoff
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AJFan

I've just come back to training after 3 weeks off due to illness. I'm substantially stronger on some of my exercises and much weaker on others (and about the same on some).

I was a bit surprised by this, especially the stronger and weaker thing. What does this mean? Does it have any implications for the way that I should train for those particular exercises?

I'm curious about your thoughts,
AJFan
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dhartnet

New Hampshire, USA

Ive had a week layoff after throat surgery last week, started lifting again today.. Lost lots of strength it seems, maybe because my energy is real low and I'm on Meds.

Ill give it a week or two of light lifting and then hope to ramp it back up. Strength & intensity go hand in hand for me.

Good luck...
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hungrywebworm


AJFan wrote:
Does it have any implications for the way that I should train for those particular exercises?


Which exercises?

You mean train as infrequently as once every 3 weeks?

Maybe you just needed a layoff.

Are you a bodybuilder?

What effect did you notice from the lack of training on your physique?
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Acerimmer1

AJFan wrote:
I've just come back to training after 3 weeks off due to illness. I'm substantially stronger on some of my exercises and much weaker on others (and about the same on some).

I was a bit surprised by this, especially the stronger and weaker thing. What does this mean? Does it have any implications for the way that I should train for those particular exercises?

I'm curious about your thoughts,
AJFan


If it shows anything you can use (which may be unlikely) I think it's got to be that you were always (read before the layoff) allowing too much recovery time for those muscles that are now weaker, and not enough for those which are now stronger.

But thats drawing a long line.
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AJFan

Acerimmer1 wrote:
If it shows anything you can use (which may be unlikely) I think it's got to be that you were always (read before the layoff) allowing too much recovery time for those muscles that are now weaker, and not enough for those which are now stronger.

But thats drawing a long line.


Yeah, its probably unwise to draw too much from one event. I'll just have to keep it in mind when looking at my progress with those exercises. Maybe more or less rest will be called for.

Thanks,
AJFan
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AJFan

hungrywebworm wrote:
Which exercises?

Stronger on Squat, Front Raise. I've had slow/no progress on my squat for a while.

Weaker on Leg Curl, Bicep Curl. I usually have slow/no progress on Leg Curl, but my Bicep Curl often seems to go up no probs.


You mean train as infrequently as once every 3 weeks?

The thought did cross my mind, for those particular exercises only.

Maybe you just needed a layoff.

Are you a bodybuilder?

No.


What effect did you notice from the lack of training on your physique?

Nothing significant enough for me to notice.
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hungrywebworm

Train legs once a week. Squat once every 3 weeks. Do other leg exercises on the workouts you don't do squats. Step ups, leg extensions, leg presses etc.
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medici

Spain

hungrywebworm wrote:
Train legs once a week. Squat once every 3 weeks. Do other leg exercises on the workouts you don't do squats. Step ups, leg extensions, leg presses etc.


I'm not writing to invalidate you, much less get into a dispute. I've tried what you're talking about and it's simply not worked for me.

I find one heavier and one lighter leg workout weekly does it best for me. One of those includes either back or front squats. I never do low reps on legs, eight being the lowest I'll consider, some sets up to 20 reps.

Since I did Olympic lifting in the early 60s, starting with split style, I like to do split squats for one of those workouts. That's an aggressive lunge, real low, front leg well over the foot. Split squats were standard for lifters of the past, none of whom were wanting for leg development.

Anything less than two workouts per body part per week and I lose strength. An occasional layoff for a few days works wonders as well - especially in this hot, hot Texas summer weather.

I'm of the opinion the original poster to this thread is more likely to be suffering the consequences of illness than just the effects of layoff. When ill, the autoimmune system is very stressed. Systemic effects undermine what we can expect either from training or layoff. Went through that earlier this year with the first sinus infection of my life- nasty business. That subtle infection eroded training sessions until it reached a point that I was running a fever. So be careful and always do one's utmost to listen to the body.

best
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hungrywebworm

No problem Kayo everyone works differently. "Different strokes for different folks."
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