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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Busy: A Good Workout?
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jaywilliams

Iowa, USA

Can anyone suggest a good work out for a guy who's week is never the same. I work graveyard shift (cop), some days i have court in the morning, some days i have court in the afternoon.

I have three kids who are all involved in soccer, baseball, dancing, football, scouts etc, etc. I have another one on the way, due any day now.

On top of all this i play in softball six months of the yr, and volley ball when softball gets over. More often then not its hard to find time to get into a "regular routine". I would like to gain some size and strength.
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josh_pitts

Ontario, CAN

Squat - one set of 20 reps or to failure
dips - one set to failure with bodyweight
chin ups - one set to failure with body weight
dips - a second set
chin ups - a second set
tricep extentions - on a machine or behind the neck with a dumbell, 10 reps
bicep curls - 10 reps with barbell
shoulder shrugs - 15 reps with barbell
sit-ups/crunches - one set for as many as you can do.

I dont think this routine should take you more than 1/2 an hour. squat with an all out effort, and then take 3 to 5 minutes rest before starting the upper body portion of the routine. rest no more than 30 seconds between the sets of dips and chinups - try not to rest at all if possible.

after completing that portion, you may need to catch your breath for another 3 to five minutes. continue the routine in the same fashion - no more than 30 seconds rest between the tricep extensions on through to the situps/crunches.

Frequency is up to you.

Josh
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Turtleman07

What kind of gym facility / equipment do you have access to?

Even if you have basic equipment at your disposal, why not take a look at Dr. Darden's "Tarzan Routine" and try that for a few weeks. He recommends doing it twice per week and, if I recall correctly, the routine only took him 12 minutes to complete.

Once you do the routine a few times, you should be able to complete it very quickly as well (with good form of course), and it sounds like your time is very limited at the moment.

Hope that helps,

Dave G.
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Lucasian

I have recently been using an early Arthur Jones routine from his second Bulletin ( http://www.drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=449461 ).

It has been tremendous fun and the strength gains have been rapid after years of no progress in that department.

It takes about 30 minutes, twice a week (Jones suggested 3x at the time, but I can't tolerate that much).

On the other hand, in an interview at the end of his life, Jones advised four adjustments to his earlier routines:

1. Cut out multiple sets of the same exercise
2. Reduce total exercises to about 8
3. Reduce frequency to 2x per week
4. Put all leg work at the start of the routine

If you made those modifications to the Bulletin 2 routine, you'd be left with the following:

1. Squat 20 reps
2. Calf Raise 20 reps
3. Stiff-Leg Deadlift 15 reps
4. Dip 10 reps
5. Chin-ups 10 reps
6. Overhead Press 10 reps
7. Barbell Curl 10 reps

This works your muscle groups leg first and largest to smallest, twice a week, about 20 minutes a pop. If you focus on getting as strong as possible and incrementally increasing your poundage, you should get close to your maximum size and strength potential. If you minimize your rest between exercises, you will become extremely cardiovascularly fit.

Regards,
Ian
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kata14

jaywilliams wrote:
Can anyone suggest a good work out for a guy who's week is never the same. I work graveyard shift (cop), some days i have court in the morning, some days i have court in the afternoon.

I have three kids who are all involved in soccer, baseball, dancing, football, scouts etc, etc. I have another one on the way, due any day now.

On top of all this i play in softball six months of the yr, and volley ball when softball gets over. More often then not its hard to find time to get into a "regular routine". I would like to gain some size and strength.


Jay, check this out. Hope it can help you.

http://www.drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=445766

Regards
Kata

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MotorFed

California, USA

you might also want to check out some of mike mentzer's consolidation routines. you can even up the frequency a bit...instead of once every seven days, maybe use it two times a week. whatever you do, keep a detailed training log and see what works for you.

i also work graveyard shift sometimes and am expected to come in early (i work security at an understaffed hotel). no kids (that i know of). but sometimes a good basic workout of three solid, basic exercises taken to failure works for me if thats all i have time for.

good luck,

dan
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shlevon

Lucasian wrote:
I have recently been using an early Arthur Jones routine from his second Bulletin ( http://www.drdarden.com/...ic.do?id=449461 ).

It has been tremendous fun and the strength gains have been rapid after years of no progress in that department.

It takes about 30 minutes, twice a week (Jones suggested 3x at the time, but I can't tolerate that much).

On the other hand, in an interview at the end of his life, Jones advised four adjustments to his earlier routines:

1. Cut out multiple sets of the same exercise
2. Reduce total exercises to about 8
3. Reduce frequency to 2x per week
4. Put all leg work at the start of the routine

If you made those modifications to the Bulletin 2 routine, you'd be left with the following:

1. Squat 20 reps
2. Calf Raise 20 reps
3. Stiff-Leg Deadlift 15 reps
4. Dip 10 reps
5. Chin-ups 10 reps
6. Overhead Press 10 reps
7. Barbell Curl 10 reps

This works your muscle groups leg first and largest to smallest, twice a week, about 20 minutes a pop. If you focus on getting as strong as possible and incrementally increasing your poundage, you should get close to your maximum size and strength potential. If you minimize your rest between exercises, you will become extremely cardiovascularly fit.

Regards,
Ian


The only thing I'd add to the above routine is some variation of the row.
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HSDAD

As an ER nurse, I have goofy shifts too. I've tried many variations of HIT and some other stuff (EDT, 3x3) to get strength training in. It's probably just me, but when I'm pressed for time, I want my workout to be particularly dense. That is, I want to do it all in less than 20 minutes. What is working best for me right now is using two comprehensive exercises done in an alternating 5x5 fashion.

I have a barbell set up for deadlift on the floor, and immediately behind it I have an old Soloflex plate loaded for standing press. I choose a weight for each that makes the final sets impossible. If I make the fifth set of either exercise,I up the weight. I do one set of the deadlift first, briefly catch my breath and then do the standing press. Then back to deadlift, etc. I take breaks that are under 1 minute in all cases. I'm usually done in @ 15 minutes give or take. I've also done the same with squats and chins or dips.

What I like about these is I don't have to drive to a gym so I can do them in my PJs as part of my morning routine and then it's done. I can get on with my day. I can take the kids to the bike trail or supervise football or whatever.

These workouts hit just about every muscle in the body and do it HARD and do it in very limited time. And having the stuff around and already set up means you can work it into your schedule. It will never top having a regular date at the gym and a planned workout of 8 - 10 exercises to cover the whole musculature, but it fits in my life (which sounds not too dissimilar from yours) much better.

It's probably insufficient for bodybuilding, but for general fitness, these sorts of workouts are more than adequate. My strength is going up in leaps and bounds and that is my only near term goal anyway.

I hope you find this of some use.

Joe
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EB Jones

New York, USA

How about a 3x3
done in a round robin fashion as listed:
Squat/leg press(your choice 20 reps
Chin/pull down (your choice) 12 reps
Chest exercise of your choosing 10 reps.

Second go around target reps would be as follows 15 for squat,10 for back and 8 for chest

Final round target reps would be 10-12 for legs,8 for back and reps of as many as possble for chest.
you only rest at the end of each round and then only long enough for your breathing to return to normal.

Do this rotine 2 to 3 times a week, 2 would prohably be best as it takes a lot out of you. This is a good condictioning routine.

Oh and when you can hit the the upper end of the target range of reps in all three exercise 20, 12 and 10 then you add weight.
If done properly with little rest you should be done in about 20 minutes.
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Crotalus

I think Ian nailed it dead-nuts ....

In my opinion that's an excellent, consolidated routine. Matter of fact, I don't see that as a 'replacement routine' for someone short on time, I see that as an excellent, hardcore , ass kicking workout anytime.

Seems too short ? You hit that routine like you should and you'll need as much time laying on the floor recovering as you needed to get through it. Do it right and as Jones or Dr. Ken would say , " ... you won't want anymore."

I'd probably substitute an ab exercise in place of the curls ; but you could just add an ab mov't and keep the curls too ... the routine is brief enough to do that.

You've learned you H.I.T lessons well, Ian, LOL.
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manzo

If i had really limited time and energy to strength train i would do something like this:
2 abbreviated full body routines (A & B), each performed once/week. Such as mon A, thurs B or something similar.

(choose 1 exercise from each of the following groups.)

ROUTINE A
1.squat/leg press/lunge/single leg squat
2.Bench press/low incline press/ dip/decline press
3.one arm dumbell row/bench row/low row/other supported row
4. OPTIONAL - side bend/twist crunch/ other oblique exercise
5. OPTIONAL - back extension

ROUTINE B
1. RDL/DL/rev back extension/hip extension/leg curl
2. Chin/pull up/ pulldown/high row
3. OH press /high incline press
4. OPTIONAL - crunch/rev crunch
5. OPTIONAL - shrug

If you choose not to perform the OPTIONAL exercises that leaves 3 exercises /workout.

You could also perform the OPTIONAL exercises on a seperate third day but you may not have time or energy for this.
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JONKILCOYNE

Florida, USA

I would recommend to go with what Lucasian said. It is wise advice.
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