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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Steer Clear of Cardio?
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Maximise

Mentzer stated in his books and on the H.I.T DVD that cardio was a waste of time and effort. I must dispute this as I do five minutes on the treadmill and I find it wakes me into a prepared workout. He also states the same about stretching, again I find just limbering up the muscles for a little bit gets them ready and I feel more awake. I know he means you'll get this through a full ROM but you end up feeling lazy I find. Who else feels different to what he states? After all, he was definately a man with great philosphy but he wasn't always correct, but who is ?!
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pyro13g

Ohio, USA

It's not a waste of time if it's something you enjoy and makes you feel better going into a work out.

I have no Idea why he said that, I've never read anything by him.

I do some jumping jacks, run in place, up and down the stairs a few times, and sometimes bust out a short groove on the drum set. About three minutes total.
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TheSofaKing

Manitoba, CAN

Maximise wrote:
Mentzer stated in his books and on the H.I.T DVD that cardio was a waste of time and effort. I must dispute this as I do five minutes on the treadmill and I find it wakes me into a prepared workout.


I wouldn't consider that "cardio". What "cardio" benefit do you think you are getting from 5 minutes? I'd call it a warm up.
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AShortt

Ontario, CAN

Adaptations to exercise stress are highly specific - once you digest that, many questions are easy to answer or at least get a handle on.

Just think specifically about how you train and that is precisely how you will adapt. Are there some cross over benefits from:

- greater strength
- better muscular balance (push pull around joints, left side to right side of body, upper to lower body etc)
- greater flexibility
- fuller function (strength and endurance) throughout a fuller ROM?

Of course there are.

These types of adaptations, garnered from short infrequent high intensity exercise, will benefit you in longer duration lower intensity activities. However, the greatest effect is seen...within the specific environment trained.

The thing is, too much muscle is not a issue unless you are one in a million. This where as, very high levels of endurance are rarely needed and most often come with an unreasonable price. It depends on your POV, as any 'all out' athletic endeavors come at a price.

Bottom line train specific to your wants and needs.

So the complete question is: "This is what I want...do I need to add any specific aerobic/endurance based exercise and if so, what type?"

Regards,
Andrew
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davise

What you are doing is a warmup, not cardio...do however much you need to get the cobwebs out...varies per person, climate, injury history and age.

I really don't need any more "cardio" than what I get from my 2 HIT workouts using the rush factor and my three MA workouts a week. That being said however, I do get tested on a timed run for the reserves. Running is a skill. I am already cardiovascularly fit from HIT and MA, but I go out and "practice" a timed run once a week.

I practice stride length, pacing etc and push to shave a few seconds off my time or at least match the last practiced run. My wife looks at me crazy when she asks me where I'm going and I tell her I'm doing my weekly practice run. That is what I am doing though; It is not increasing my fitness, it is finetuning a skill. When I retire from the reserves, I will never run again...unless something bigger and meaner then myself is chasing me.
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medici

Spain

Published studies in referreed journals demonstrate that HIT done correctly has cardio benefits equalling or bettering those of one group of subjects running 4 or 5 miles daily five times weekly.

While Mentzer is interesting, a lot of water has passed under the bridge since he wrote; besides, he didn't really care about health and fitness benefits of training, just getting big.

Sarcopenia based research indicates too much cardio puts people as much at danger to wasting of type II strength fiber as does a sedentary life style. These days interval training is getting the nod for cardio efficiency. HIT is essentially interval training if approached toward maximum output combined with resting long enough to catch your breath between movements. I'd err on the side of 2 sets HIT to really promote the effect, one akin to running wind sprints.

Dr Al Sears' PACE book explains it all in an easy to read albeit simplistic manner.
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

Probably the most important point to understand, is that High Pulse and Respiratory Rates during HIT exercise will certainly present the CV system with a stimulus to adapt to.

However, these high rates also "reduce" your ability to use large weights, and thus reduce strength gains.

It is a rob Peter to pay Paul relationship.

If you want to "just be in good shape". then it will work fine, but you will not reach anywhere close to your potential in either by trying to do both at the same time.

To that end, and since I like to train heavy, I use a High Intensity Weight training session, and on an entirely separate day, a HIIT (High Intensity Interval Training) program for higher level cardio.

Neither negatively impacts the other, and I get the best of both worlds.
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davise

John,

I wholeheartedly agree with you. When I ran cross country, I trained a completely different way. When I did amateur powerlifting, I trained a completely different way. What I would argue is that training at a fast clip with no rest gives you a type of fitness that can't be achieved by either traditional weight training or cardiovascular conditioning.

Seems to transfer well (at least to me) for everyday things like helping a friend carry a washer up a flight of stairs, helping a friend build a deck, chopping wood etc. I helped a friend of mine (much stronger than myself) build a deck in the hot sun and I was much less the worse for wear than him at the end of the day. I was much less winded than my long distance runner friend carrying a washer up two flights of stairs. I would say training this way gives you a kind of hybrid fitness superior for some everyday things; accomplished in a minimal amount of time. Not very scientific I know, just general observation.

Now a guy who drinks beer like a fish and smokes cigarettes all day who builds decks for a living or works for a moving company could probably outwork me and my friends, but that would be because of skill and knowing how to work efficiently and use economy of motion. It wouldn't be because he has a higher level of fitness. Interesting.
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marcrph

Portugal

Just exactly what is cardio supposed to do, ie. the purpose?

Correct me if I am wrong, but many people have been long lived without ever knowing of cardio. My grandfather lived to 99 years of age, and never even heard of cardio? Ditto many other people!

Cardio can not be justly reasoned necessary for health reasons, because no one can increase their life span by doing cardio!

On the other hand, getting lean and strong has a positive effect on longevity of life.

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Tom Traynor

I believe people do it under the misinformed guise of "cardio" burns off significant amounts of fat. If sentencing yourself to 30-90 minutes of "cardio" per day (most usually don't tax the heart enough to do much of anything of worth) to make up for 30 seconds of eating the wrong type of foods....well, knock yourself out.

I say their time would be better spent working with Habitat for Humanity; a pet shelter; doing college course-work; or being a Big Brother/Sister to disadvantged youth. This would be a much better use of their lives--and give them their "high"......

Cliff Notes: Cardio as done by most isn't cardio--and is a....retarded waste of life and living.
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Maximise

Well I do know this, yesterday I did a maximum of 35-40 mins HIT training session just doing pecs and lats, with just five minutes fast paced tred mill and limbering up and I feel great as I can feel the soreness even with a good doseage of sleep. As you say it's what works souly for you.
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

marcrph wrote:

Cardio can not be justly reasoned necessary for health reasons, because no one can increase their life span by doing cardio!

On the other hand, getting lean and strong has a positive effect on longevity of life.



Hi Marc,

Presumably like everything else you will be affected by your genes, your lifestyle, and your environment.

No one can say exactly "what" kills one at 52, and another at 102, since there are so many factors.

But one thing you can rest assured.

The last two things to happen before you die, is that you quit breating, and your heart stops beating.

Strength will have no bearing on longevity and there is actually no reason to maintain strength beyond your daily needs. To this end, one might make the argument that it boils down to maintaining an active "quality of life".

That said, I think it reasonable to make the effort to eat, and take known supplements, and exercise to the highest function one can maintain on a regular basis.

I don't subscribe to the anti-cardio groups except to the point that I don't find LSD type training of a type that is likely NOT the best type of cardio.

I feel that a good selection of long chain strength exercises will help against sarcopenia, and osteoporosis, and a HIIT (Higher Intensity Interval Type) Cardio program will both contribute to the stimualtion of the bodies muscles, organs, endocrine system, and blood constituent levels.

I know a few years ago (55) I had a body and heart scan, and on the coronary artery scan, I had a big fat ZERO. That means no calcium on the coronary arteries.

Since my father had two "stint" surgeries before he passed away, and both grand fathers passed from heart failure, I might be happy to see those results.

I'd like to think they came from 30 years of weight training, good nutrition and supplementation, and High Intensity Cardio.



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marcrph

Portugal

BIO-FORCE wrote:
marcrph wrote:

Cardio can not be justly reasoned necessary for health reasons, because no one can increase their life span by doing cardio!

On the other hand, getting lean and strong has a positive effect on longevity of life.



Hi Marc,

Presumably like everything else you will be affected by your genes, your lifestyle, and your environment.

No one can say exactly "what" kills one at 52, and another at 102, since there are so many factors.

But one thing you can rest assured.

The last two things to happen before you die, is that you quit breating, and your heart stops beating.

Strength will have no bearing on longevity and there is actually no reason to maintain strength beyond your daily needs. To this end, one might make the argument that it boils down to maintaining an active "quality of life".

That said, I think it reasonable to make the effort to eat, and take known supplements, and exercise to the highest function one can maintain on a regular basis.

I don't subscribe to the anti-cardio groups except to the point that I don't find LSD type training of a type that is likely the best type of cardio.

I feel that a good selection of long chain strength exercises will help against sarcopenia, and osteoporosis, and a HIIT (Higher Intensity Interval Type) Cardio program will both contribute to the stimualtion of the bodies muscles, organs, endocrine system, and blood constituent levels.

I know a few years ago (55) I had a body and heart scan, and on the coronary artery scan, I had a big fat ZERO. That means no calcium on the coronary arteries.

Since my father had two "stint" surgeries before he passed away, and both grand fathers passed from heart failure, I might be happy to see those results.

I'd like to think they came from 30 years of weight training, good nutrition and supplementation, and High Intensity Cardio.





John,

In the end, bodily training is beneficial for a little.

You mentioned High Intensity Interval Training, as this taxes the body systems severe enough to cause adaptations. This is not traditional cardio.

Strength will keep you productive for those twilight years of life, from falling and breaking a hip(possibly a death sentence in today's hospital).
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HIT

Norway

marcrph wrote:
BIO-FORCE wrote:
marcrph wrote:

Cardio can not be justly reasoned necessary for health reasons, because no one can increase their life span by doing cardio!

On the other hand, getting lean and strong has a positive effect on longevity of life.



Hi Marc,

Presumably like everything else you will be affected by your genes, your lifestyle, and your environment.

No one can say exactly "what" kills one at 52, and another at 102, since there are so many factors.

But one thing you can rest assured.

The last two things to happen before you die, is that you quit breating, and your heart stops beating.

Strength will have no bearing on longevity and there is actually no reason to maintain strength beyond your daily needs. To this end, one might make the argument that it boils down to maintaining an active "quality of life".

That said, I think it reasonable to make the effort to eat, and take known supplements, and exercise to the highest function one can maintain on a regular basis.

I don't subscribe to the anti-cardio groups except to the point that I don't find LSD type training of a type that is likely the best type of cardio.

I feel that a good selection of long chain strength exercises will help against sarcopenia, and osteoporosis, and a HIIT (Higher Intensity Interval Type) Cardio program will both contribute to the stimualtion of the bodies muscles, organs, endocrine system, and blood constituent levels.

I know a few years ago (55) I had a body and heart scan, and on the coronary artery scan, I had a big fat ZERO. That means no calcium on the coronary arteries.

Since my father had two "stint" surgeries before he passed away, and both grand fathers passed from heart failure, I might be happy to see those results.

I'd like to think they came from 30 years of weight training, good nutrition and supplementation, and High Intensity Cardio.





John,

In the end, bodily training is beneficial for a little.

You mentioned High Intensity Interval Training, as this taxes the body systems severe enough to cause adaptations. This is not traditional cardio.

Strength will keep you productive for those twilight years of life, from falling and breaking a hip(possibly a death sentence in today's hospital).


After 30-60 minutes of low intensity cardio (120 beats per minute or less) I feel good. I feel relaxed and I feel energetic.

If I feel stressed out 45 minutes on the bike can do wonders for my mind. If my mind works the rest of my body will reap the benefit also!

Cardio makes me feel good! If that isn't a good reason for doing cardio I don't know what is!

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Growl

HIT,
If you are experiencing positive psychological benefits, then nothing else should matter, provided you proceed in a safe manner.
Jeff
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

marcrph wrote:

John,

In the end, bodily training is beneficial for a little.

You mentioned High Intensity Interval Training, as this taxes the body systems severe enough to cause adaptations. This is not traditional cardio.

Strength will keep you productive for those twilight years of life, from falling and breaking a hip(possibly a death sentence in today's hospital).



Hi Marc,

Exactly. Please note that I "edited" my first post to say that LSD "IS NOT" IMO the best cardioRes training.

The whole idea is reduce sarcopenia and Osteoporosis, keep the Heart and lungs strong, don't gain excessive BF, and fight any and all inflamation type diseases.
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medici

Spain

BIO-FORCE wrote:

The whole idea is reduce sarcopenia and Osteoporosis, keep the Heart and lungs strong, don't gain excessive BF, and fight any and all inflamation type diseases.


John:

As a fine point, osteoporosis is one of the bio-markers or metabolic syndrome effects of sarcopenia based on the landmark discoveries of Evanston et al at Tuffs in the late 80s, later reported in their book Bio-Markers. Other effects of sarcopenia include elevated blood lipids, type II diabetes onset, arthritis, and other sad conditions usually ascribed to then dismissed as "aging". Research into sarcopenia was trigger by the generation before our's of ironmen!

best
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marcrph

Portugal

HIT wrote:
marcrph wrote:
BIO-FORCE wrote:
marcrph wrote:

Cardio can not be justly reasoned necessary for health reasons, because no one can increase their life span by doing cardio!

On the other hand, getting lean and strong has a positive effect on longevity of life.



Hi Marc,

Presumably like everything else you will be affected by your genes, your lifestyle, and your environment.

No one can say exactly "what" kills one at 52, and another at 102, since there are so many factors.

But one thing you can rest assured.

The last two things to happen before you die, is that you quit breating, and your heart stops beating.

Strength will have no bearing on longevity and there is actually no reason to maintain strength beyond your daily needs. To this end, one might make the argument that it boils down to maintaining an active "quality of life".

That said, I think it reasonable to make the effort to eat, and take known supplements, and exercise to the highest function one can maintain on a regular basis.

I don't subscribe to the anti-cardio groups except to the point that I don't find LSD type training of a type that is likely the best type of cardio.

I feel that a good selection of long chain strength exercises will help against sarcopenia, and osteoporosis, and a HIIT (Higher Intensity Interval Type) Cardio program will both contribute to the stimualtion of the bodies muscles, organs, endocrine system, and blood constituent levels.

I know a few years ago (55) I had a body and heart scan, and on the coronary artery scan, I had a big fat ZERO. That means no calcium on the coronary arteries.

Since my father had two "stint" surgeries before he passed away, and both grand fathers passed from heart failure, I might be happy to see those results.

I'd like to think they came from 30 years of weight training, good nutrition and supplementation, and High Intensity Cardio.





John,

In the end, bodily training is beneficial for a little.

You mentioned High Intensity Interval Training, as this taxes the body systems severe enough to cause adaptations. This is not traditional cardio.

Strength will keep you productive for those twilight years of life, from falling and breaking a hip(possibly a death sentence in today's hospital).

After 30-60 minutes of low intensity cardio (120 beats per minute or less) I feel good. I feel relaxed and I feel energetic.

If I feel stressed out 45 minutes on the bike can do wonders for my mind. If my mind works the rest of my body will reap the benefit also!

Cardio makes me feel good! If that isn't a good reason for doing cardio I don't know what is!



Please note, this 30-60 minutes may seem non stressful, but could possibly hinder strength gains.

Meditation, stretching, reading a book, volunteer work, attending religious services seem to do the trick for me.
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garethit


After 30-60 minutes of low intensity cardio (120 beats per minute or less) I feel good. I feel relaxed and I feel energetic.

If I feel stressed out 45 minutes on the bike can do wonders for my mind. If my mind works the rest of my body will reap the benefit also!

Cardio makes me feel good! If that isn't a good reason for doing cardio I don't know what is!

[/quote]

I've always thought that the biggest benefit of cardio is stress relief, a bit of exercise burns up all those stress hormones that are floating around causing untold damage to your body's cells.

From what little I've read on the subject there seems to be very little connection between fitness levels and longevity but there does appear to be some connection between activity levels and longevity.

As a means of stress relief it should be an activity you enjoy and not performed at a level where it becomes a stressor itself, your body is designed for activity not sitting around on your backside all day, give it what it needs.

Gareth.

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deanjones

Instead of doing 5 minutes of cardio on a treadmill, try actually warming the entire body up with something like this:

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=ake8Q9StTTs

It's a great cardio workout as well as warms up every single muscle in your body... not just your poor joints from running. :)
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marcrph

Portugal

deanjones wrote:
Instead of doing 5 minutes of cardio on a treadmill, try actually warming the entire body up with something like this:

http://www.youtube.com/...h?v=ake8Q9StTTs

It's a great cardio workout as well as warms up every single muscle in your body... not just your poor joints from running. :)



What purpose does increasing the body temperature from 98.6 degrees Fahrenheit serve?

Does 99.6 degrees Fahrenheit help the body perform better?

If that is true, why not 100...101...102
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waynegr

Switzerland

Hi all,

As we are taking of cardio, would anyone like to put down their resting heart rate and age, and if they do cardo or not.

For resting heart trate I mean being seated and rested for at least 10 mins then taking a reading.

Wayne
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spud

marcrph wrote:
Just exactly what is cardio supposed to do, ie. the purpose?

Correct me if I am wrong, but many people have been long lived without ever knowing of cardio. My grandfather lived to 99 years of age, and never even heard of cardio? Ditto many other people!


Marc,

I'm in total agreement with you.

I look at my 85 year old grandfather who is still going, and I ask myself:

"What could he use most? Running 3 miles 2 or 3 times a week or 20 minutes of HIT 2 or 3 times a week?"

The answer really is a no brainer.

HIT would vastly improve the quality of his life whilst not injuring him.

Cardio would probably put him in a wheel chair.
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waynegr

Switzerland

davise wrote:
John,


Now a guy who drinks beer like a fish and smokes cigarettes all day who builds decks for a living or works for a moving company could probably outwork me and my friends, but that would be because of skill and knowing how to work efficiently and use economy of motion. It wouldn't be because he has a higher level of fitness. Interesting.


I know all walks of life, Multi Millionaires, fit people unfit people, normal 9 to 5 people, people who sit on their ass all day, drug pushers, people who go to the bar day and night.

However I do know a lot of very hard working labours, that work on building sites, underground or on the highways that are very fit, and their fitness is not because of skill and knowing how to work efficiently and use economy of motion, and these people smoke all day and drink most nights.

Wayne

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waynegr

Switzerland

spud wrote:
marcrph wrote:
Just exactly what is cardio supposed to do, ie. the purpose?

Correct me if I am wrong, but many people have been long lived without ever knowing of cardio. My grandfather lived to 99 years of age, and never even heard of cardio? Ditto many other people!

Marc,

I'm in total agreement with you.

I look at my 85 year old grandfather who is still going, and I ask myself:

"What could he use most? Running 3 miles 2 or 3 times a week or 20 minutes of HIT 2 or 3 times a week?"

The answer really is a no brainer.

HIT would vastly improve the quality of his life whilst not injuring him.

Cardio would probably put him in a wheel chair.


Correct me if I am wrong also, but many many many people have been short lived without ever knowing of cardio.

Wayne

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