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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
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must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
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This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

I found this interesting. Seems to pull a 26,000 pound Semi Truck you need to exert around 500# of force for reps.

http://channel.nationalgeograp...
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All Pro

BIO-FORCE wrote:
I found this interesting. Seems to pull a 26,000 pound Semi Truck you need to exert around 500# of force for reps.

http://channel.nationalgeograp...


As JamesT would say " the pull was too dangerous and inefficient because the rep speed was to fast and the strongman didn't wrap himself in bubble wrap to prevent injury before pulling the truck. Obviously the man is a genetic freak and using drugs"
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winstonnmccay

Actually yes..the man is a genetic freak and since they dont drug test in the Worlds Strangest Man, likley using some sort of performance enhancing drug.

Although still impressive.
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the_iron_goose

Now I know he's not but he looks like a fat guy flipping big donuts training with those tires, lol

Time To Make The Donuts, lol
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the_iron_goose

BIO-FORCE wrote:
I found this interesting. Seems to pull a 26,000 pound Semi Truck you need to exert around 500# of force for reps.

http://channel.nationalgeograp...


Oh, don't be fooled, Bio, it takes more than that. You need to find someone with a 26,000 pound Semi dumb enough to let the truck sit there while you try to pull it - and people like that are rare.
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medici

Spain

When I first moved to Austin within two weeks I was invited over to the University of Texas' football gym to watch a training session with Mark Henry - the drug-free, natural Mark Henry, under the guidance of Professor Terry Todd.

(Terry was the first national champion heavyweight powerlifter in the mid 60s, also producer of the strong man competition each year at the Arnold Classic; his wife, Professor Jan, was the first woman to squat over 500 thirty years ago.).

In that gym there were heavier replicas of the Thomas Inch dumbbell, and the Appollon barbell - the one made of train wheels!

This was to be Mark's first workout in four months. The late Chris Benoit had dislocated Mark's shoulder in a WWE match, which together with a bench pressing injury (Mark rarely does them, and playing with 550 at Gold's Venice did a number on his biceps tendon) resulting in surgery for both. Throughout that time Benoit called him regularly, making sure his motivation was high.

While healing, Professor Todd had a special dumbbell handle made for Mark - three inch diameter round stock milled down on the ends to accept Olympic plates. Out of shape, Mark worked up to a scant 225 doing one arm upright rows with that dumbbell - the diameter of the gripping surface being 3". Mark wears an 8.75 inch hat size, and there are no gloves made that fit his hands - he opens a can of Coke by grip squeezing it! Five months later Mark told me he was up to 285 on the one arm upright rows for sets of five.

That day his shoulder went into spasm so I did some trigger point work on him - the density of that man's musculature is beyond belief - 6/2" tall and 400 pounds.

I've heard a story around town about 19 year old Mark doing a powerlifting contest in Oak Hill, TX. The story goes he did a flawless squat with 950, racked , then walked away from the rack - upon which the bar split in half on the rack.

On top of all that he's one of the nicest, funniest, down to earth person's you'll ever meet.
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Mark S

All Pro wrote:

As JamesT would say " the pull was too dangerous and inefficient because the rep speed was to fast and the strongman didn't wrap himself in bubble wrap to prevent injury before pulling the truck. Obviously the man is a genetic freak and using drugs"


I'd have to disagree with JamesT there.
Strongman is perfectly safe. Natural ability and drugs having nothing to do with it whatsoever.
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

I guess you could make the point that in this type of competition you need both Strength, Speed, and Power/Endurance.

This is not achieved via sets of low reps only.

Another observation, is that "most" events are "long Kinetic Chains", and those chains run from the hands to the feet, or the shoulders to the feet.
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All Pro

BIO-FORCE wrote:
I guess you could make the point that in this type of competition you need both Strength, Speed, and Power/Endurance.

This is not achieved via sets of low reps only.

Another observation, is that "most" events are "long Kinetic Chains", and those chains run from the hands to the feet, or the shoulders to the feet.

John, do you remember the show ABC had years ago, I think it was called Super Stars? One of the events was to pull the tractor trailer for I think it was 50 feet. The NFL pretty much owned that event. The only others I ever saw do well in it where from the NHL. And after watching that guy flip a tractor tire I feel kind of embarrassed only using a truck tire.
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jeffpinter

California, USA

BIO-FORCE wrote:
I found this interesting. Seems to pull a 26,000 pound Semi Truck you need to exert around 500# of force for reps.

That is interesting just in itself: the force of friction in this case is 500 pounds for the semi (I actually would have thought it to be more than this). And just as interesting that his generated force cycled between 100 pounds and 500 pounds during each step due to the mechanics involved.



I guess you could make the point that in this type of competition you need both Strength, Speed, and Power/Endurance.

Speaking of power, I calculate that he's generating an average of about 2 horsepower!!



This is not achieved via sets of low reps only.

Like the guy says...like a set of 500 pound squats for 48 reps!!



Another observation, is that "most" events are "long Kinetic Chains", and those chains run from the hands to the feet, or the shoulders to the feet


You could probably argue that this "exercise" allows the maximum power production, since it involves every muscle from the hands to the feet.

I think you should incorporate the "semi-pull" into an ultimate RH workout. Three "sets" would be performed per the usual. The first set would involve pulling the empty semi for 200 feet. The 2nd set and 3rd sets would be pulled 100 feet and 50 feet respectively, each with a heavier payload added to the trailor (forklift and several hundred sacks of fertilizer optional equipment).

One or two of these workouts per week would probably be enough. Imagine the power and muscle that would be built. I'm getting excited just thinking about it!

Jeff

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Zenontheterrible

that was a cool experiment... good link.

I don't really think thats like a 500 lbs squat though since he's using one leg at a time...and pulling with his arms!

more like a 1/8th rom one legged/one armed-chin/squat thingy at 500lbs... or something... haha...

while this guy is strong i'm far more impressed with Mariusz Pudzianowski.
Not because he's stronger (which he is), but because he manages to keep a relatively lean and healthy physic while being a monstrously strong individual.
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Benjamin Dover

All Pro wrote:
BIO-FORCE wrote:
I found this interesting. Seems to pull a 26,000 pound Semi Truck you need to exert around 500# of force for reps.

http://channel.nationalgeograp...

As JamesT would say " the pull was too dangerous and inefficient because the rep speed was to fast and the strongman didn't wrap himself in bubble wrap to prevent injury before pulling the truck. Obviously the man is a genetic freak and using drugs"


What can I say? Spoken as if I'd got my hand up your arse pulling the strings...dummy
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New Here

Watch out for the peanuts, James!
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Benjamin Dover

What possible use is any of this so called information?

"Oh, look at the big man pulling a lorry!"

Hello?! Kinetic chain? Give me a break. Let's confuse building strength with demonstrating strength, biomechanically efficient exercise with feats of strength and big men pulling trucks with pulling trucks to become big men!?

Hey AP, a friend of mine was competing in a British Strongman Qualifier. He went to a specialist gym where he could practice those crazy events. He was having a bit of forearm trouble and asked a well known strongman for some advice. The advice was simple, regular shots of growth hormone into the problem area! He'd only been trying deca. On event day he tore his bicep tendon clean from the bone, requiring surgery. He couldn't train for months. On his return to training, after a long period without drugs he weighed in at just over 250lbs.

HE WEIGHED IN AT 250, DRUG FREE, UNTRAINED, AFTER A LAYOFF FOR SEVERAL MONTHS DUE TO INJURY CAUSED BY STRONGMAN!

This tells me 3 things:

1. Strongman IS dangerous, to state the stupidly obvious
2. They'll use drugs for all manner of purposes (powerlifting cokeheads are always interesting)
3. You'll need otherworldly genetics if you want to pull trucks

I thought I'd elaborate on the words you put forth on my behalf. Thanks AP.

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All Pro

JamesT wrote:

Hey AP, a friend of mine was competing in a British Strongman Qualifier. He went to a specialist gym where he could practice those crazy events. He was having a bit of forearm trouble and asked a well known strongman for some advice. The advice was simple, regular shots of growth hormone into the problem area! He'd only been trying deca. On event day he tore his bicep tendon clean from the bone, requiring surgery. He couldn't train for months. On his return to training, after a long period without drugs he weighed in at just over 250lbs.

HE WEIGHED IN AT 250, DRUG FREE, UNTRAINED, AFTER A LAYOFF FOR SEVERAL MONTHS DUE TO INJURY CAUSED BY STRONGMAN!

This tells me 3 things:

1. Strongman IS dangerous, to state the stupidly obvious
2. They'll use drugs for all manner of purposes (powerlifting cokeheads are always interesting)
3. You'll need otherworldly genetics if you want to pull trucks

I thought I'd elaborate on the words you put forth on my behalf. Thanks AP.


Strongman competitions are interesting to watch but it isn't something I've ever aspired to nor would I attempt to train as they do. They are no doubt genetic freaks and using gallons of AAS.

About your friend's injury, you don't have to use AAS to have that happen. All you have to do is train in a manner that allows the muscles to gain strength at a faster rate than the joints, ligaments, tendons and bones and not change the training program to address the issue. The weakest link in the chain will fail when taxed to the maximum degree. Ask Dorian Yates about that. If you don't deload and/or do lactic acid sets at some point, you will have a problem. It's not like your body doesn't give you any warning because it does. Sore joints shouldn't be ignored.
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All Pro

JamesT wrote:
What can I say? Spoken as if I'd got my hand up your arse pulling the strings...dummy

You've got cold hands and you need to trim your nails.

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Mr. Strong

Those strongman events are as ridiculous as bodybuilding and powerlifting. Surely no one is gullible enough to think any of them are natural.
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Mark S

JamesT wrote:


Hey AP, a friend of mine was competing in a British Strongman Qualifier. He went to a specialist gym where he could practice those crazy events. He was having a bit of forearm trouble and asked a well known strongman for some advice. The advice was simple, regular shots of growth hormone into the problem area! He'd only been trying deca. On event day he tore his bicep tendon clean from the bone, requiring surgery. He couldn't train for months. On his return to training, after a long period without drugs he weighed in at just over 250lbs.

HE WEIGHED IN AT 250, DRUG FREE, UNTRAINED, AFTER A LAYOFF FOR SEVERAL MONTHS DUE TO INJURY CAUSED BY STRONGMAN!

This tells me 3 things:

1. Strongman IS dangerous, to state the stupidly obvious
2. They'll use drugs for all manner of purposes (powerlifting cokeheads are always interesting)
3. You'll need otherworldly genetics if you want to pull trucks

I thought I'd elaborate on the words you put forth on my behalf. Thanks AP.



James I went to this to cheer Paul on.As well as Paul's injury Spencer Hyland did the same thing in the same event (Power Cleaning logs)just a year after it happened to his other bicep.The main supplements of choice on the day were speed and ephedrine.
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Mark S

BIO-FORCE wrote:

This is not achieved via sets of low reps only.



So how is this achieved then? It wouldn't involve light weight for high reps ending with a heavier set for lower reps would it?
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

jeffpinter wrote:
BIO-FORCE wrote:
I found this interesting. Seems to pull a 26,000 pound Semi Truck you need to exert around 500# of force for reps.




That is interesting just in itself: the force of friction in this case is 500 pounds for the semi (I actually would have thought it to be more than this). And just as interesting that his generated force cycled between 100 pounds and 500 pounds during each step due to the mechanics involved.


You can be assured that the tires are "pumped" to crazy high inflations to reduce "rolling resistance".


jeffpinter wrote:
BIO-FORCE wrote:

This is not achieved via sets of low reps only.
Like the guy says...like a set of 500 pound squats for 48 reps!!


And like someone else posted it might be more like that load on a single arm and leg (shorter ROM)


jeffpinter wrote:
BIO-FORCE wrote:

I think you should incorporate the "semi-pull" into an ultimate RH workout. Three "sets" would be performed per the usual. The first set would involve pulling the empty semi for 200 feet. The 2nd set and 3rd sets would be pulled 100 feet and 50 feet respectively, each with a heavier payload added to the trailor (forklift and several hundred sacks of fertilizer optional equipment).


When you first mentioned your Squat/DIP, I envisioned the Squat/Pull-up to go with it which is of a similar nature.

If one is looking for the "Ultimate SSTF, Full Body WO" they might consider "alternating" the Squat Dip and the Squat Pull-up on consecutive WO's to failure.

You'd be hard pressed to top that as a Single Exercise, SSTF, WO. Even if you did them SLOW, you might have the shortest duration full body WO possible and still hit most all muscle groups.

jeffpinter wrote:
BIO-FORCE wrote:

One or two of these workouts per week would probably be enough. Imagine the power and muscle that would be built. I'm getting excited just thinking about it!

Jeff



That is what I am getting at.

I was training a girl for the Los Angeles Fire Dept, and part of her training consisted of pulling her car around the parking lot, but she didn't have a rope to add the upper body component.
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

All Pro wrote:
BIO-FORCE wrote:
I guess you could make the point that in this type of competition you need both Strength, Speed, and Power/Endurance.

This is not achieved via sets of low reps only.

Another observation, is that "most" events are "long Kinetic Chains", and those chains run from the hands to the feet, or the shoulders to the feet.
John, do you remember the show ABC had years ago, I think it was called Super Stars? One of the events was to pull the tractor trailer for I think it was 50 feet. The NFL pretty much owned that event. The only others I ever saw do well in it where from the NHL. And after watching that guy flip a tractor tire I feel kind of embarrassed only using a truck tire.


I was a "farm boy" and grew up on a farm and flipped many a Tractor Tire, but they were not the type from Earth Movers, like these are.

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arnold strong1

Mr. Intensity wrote:
Those strongman events are as ridiculous as bodybuilding and powerlifting. Surely no one is gullible enough to think any of them are natural.


Seems that everybody who has achieved "greatest" must be on AAS...I have many friends who compete in strongman, powerlifting, bodybuilding - yes some take drugs but the majority do not.
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HSDAD

This is a rare gem indeed. As of late there have been few truly interesting threads on this site.

I'm sure most of these WSM competitors are juiced, but so is just about every professional athlete in the world with the possible exception of golfers (and the jury is still out there). Does that mean we can only discuss athletic performance in the backwater arena of "natural" sports? I hope not.

As for the complaining of how this is a "demonstration of strength" rather than a good way to build strength, obviously this is true. That is why it warrants viewing. It is putting one's training to an undeniable test. And it is an impressive and interesting performance. If the goal of your training is aesthetics, then obviously this isn't for you. But don't demean those who prioritize strength. I've never seen WSM competitors in interviews demeaning body builders in a like manner. Afford them the same courtesy.

I came across a woman the other day whose car was broken down on a busy road. I pushed her car as she steered to a parking lot and up the 5% grade into the parking lot. While this took more strength than most men could generate, I'm sure many if not most of the posters of this site could have matched my feat. So this act makes me neither Hercules nor Ghandi. But it was "use" of strength for someone else's benefit. I offer that as a third classification beyond just building or demonstrating strength. Perhaps if more of us went out of our way to do that sort of thing, strength training would be betterregarded in the community?

As per the truck pull, the forces demonstrated are more complex than the typical gym rat might understand. THE downward force applied is not applied directly against the load. As the pullers hips move lower to the ground, their leverage is increased, so there is some flexibility involved (mostly at the ankle) in order to get as low as possible and still maintaing enough foot contact with the ground to maintain traction. The optimum application of force would be directly against the weight as in gym exercises (squat, deadlift, etc.) but that would be parallel to the ground in this case and therefore impossible. So how much force is being generated would take some calculus to figure out, but the test ingeniously and simply calculates the amount being applied to the truck. It would be interesting to incorporate some shoe sensors to see how much force is applied to the ground and see what the discrepancy is.

A most interesting post I think.

THis truck pull in my opinion not only involves most every muscle in teh body, but involves them in the most natural way. Your legs are made predominantly to push you forward and your arms are built for pulling you up. THis particular setup uses all of the biggest muscles of the upper (lats) body and lower body (quads, glutes, hams) in their "best" range of motion, and does it all at the same time.
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

JamesT wrote:
What possible use is any of this so called information?

"Oh, look at the big man pulling a lorry!"

Hello?! Kinetic chain? Give me a break. Let's confuse building strength with demonstrating strength, biomechanically efficient exercise with feats of strength and big men pulling trucks with pulling trucks to become big men!?


Hi James,

I'm not sure of your point??? You are pretty much against anyone or any application of physical output except your own which is pretty non-defined.

In fact, I'm not sure what "your" goal is. You certainly are not after strength. You're not a bodybuilder. You are not a strength athlete, and your against BodyBuilders, Weightlifters, Powerlifters, Strength Athletes, and Strongman Competitors. You point out genetic freaks and drug users, yet work with same.

What a juxtaposition.
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BIO-FORCE

California, USA

All Pro wrote:

About your friend's injury, you don't have to use AAS to have that happen. All you have to do is train in a manner that allows the muscles to gain strength at a faster rate than the joints, ligaments, tendons and bones and not change the training program to address the issue. The weakest link in the chain will fail when taxed to the maximum degree. Ask Dorian Yates about that. If you don't deload and/or do lactic acid sets at some point, you will have a problem. It's not like your body doesn't give you any warning because it does. Sore joints shouldn't be ignored.


Good point AP, and to many, it falls on "deaf ears".

While some call machine training "Hi-Tech", and training applications that stress "isolation" of a muscle with "short kinetic chain actions" and "deactivation" of the stabilizers "advanced training", they have it "backwards".

The idea, is to progressively strengthen joints and connective tissues "ahead" of the muscles. Avoiding higher forces at "transitions" is the epitome of misunderstanding this. It is like building a 500hp engine into a car with a drive train designed for 100hp.

If one wishes to make safe progress, one must condition the support and stabilizing structures to be able to handle the larger loads of stronger contractile forces. It is interesting to see and hear those who suggest that it is the other way around.
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