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Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


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"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

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Working Up to 1 Set of 7
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Welshace13

Lately my training has been working up to one set of 10 reps on each excersise, but i find 10 too much, form breaks down, and 5 too low, normally end up using stupid weights and get stuck, so was thinking why not try 7 lol.

I dont bother doing slow reps, but i control the weight, i keep it nice and smooth, no jerking or bouncing. is 7 a pretty decent number of reps in a set aslong as the movements are controlled??
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AJFan

Great idea, I use a max rep target of 6. There is no way I could ever get to 10, unless I'm lifting a feather. No progression occurs when I go for 10, but when going for 6, I can up the weight and/or reps frequently.

This, of course will not work for everyone, but it seems to work for me.

I go in the gym and do 2 reps of one exercise then move on to a different body part. It sounds stupid, but 5 days later I can do 3 reps of the same exercise. Two reps was enough stimulation for me. I use a rep speed of 4/4, so that's a total time under load of 16 seconds, as I say, sounds ridiculous, but I end up working my way to 6, another rep each workout.
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stevecollins33

I'm surprised to hear to reach some kind of form breakdown at 10 reps. What is exactly is the problem? Lactic acid build-up? I'd be surprised.

You could experiment with a new rep range such as 7. Anabolically speaking, I doubt there would be any tangible difference going to failure on 7 reps as opposed to 10.

It's a pity 10 reps doesn't feel right for you because you're missing out on some real anabolic movements such as high-rep squats (20-30 reps). You feel like Rambo after a set of these mothers! (Don't push me!).
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Welshace13

my rep speed isnt normally 4/4 stuff, its just controlled, it might be say like 2/2 maybe even 1/1, but i never bounce and always pause at the top and bottom to minimize the momentum. but its always controlled, just not slow lol.

10 reps on things like dead lifts are way to much i find, like my grip gives out, and my legs shake like mad lol, 5 reps i end up using to much weight, and always hit brick walls, so thought i would go in the middle, 7 reps lol, pluss it seems like a nice number. pluss high reps on upper body i never seem to improve, strange really.
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

What are you talking about? Why don't you listen to the good Doctor's advice. If you can't complete 8 total reps before you can not complete another one, reduce the weight by 2-5%. When you can complete 12 or more reps increase weight by 2-5%.

Always trying to do as many reps as possible. Don't try to stop at any set number. Progress. Let your muscles tell you what to lift. Stay in the muscle building range of 8-12 reps. A 4/4 cadence would have you under tension for 64-96 sec. Rest 60 sec or less before next set or exercise. That will get a cardio effect going for you.

Dr. Darden isn't that your advice that you spelled out in chapter 10 of TNHIT book. Jump in on this one.

RTE
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Ellington Darden

rtestes wrote:
What are you talking about? Why don't you listen to the good Doctor's advice. If you can't complete 8 total reps before you can not complete another one, reduce the weight by 2-5%. When you can complete 12 or more reps increase weight by 2-5%.

Always trying to do as many reps as possible. Don't try to stop at any set number. Progress. Let your muscles tell you what to lift. Stay in the muscle building range of 8-12 reps. A 4/4 cadence would have you under tension for 64-96 sec. Rest 60 sec or less before next set or exercise. That will get a cardio effect going for you.

Dr. Darden isn't that your advice that you spelled out in chapter 10 of TNHIT book. Jump in on this one.

RTE


Yes, the above is correct. About 80% of trainees get good results from those parameters. But there are a few guys who need lower reps than 8 to 12 and a few who do best on higher reps. I've described the repetition-range test in several of my books . . . and we've discussed these concepts previously on several threads.

Ellington

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DanBeitzel87

Welshace13 wrote:
my rep speed isnt normally 4/4 stuff, its just controlled, it might be say like 2/2 maybe even 1/1, but i never bounce and always pause at the top and bottom to minimize the momentum. but its always controlled, just not slow lol.

10 reps on things like dead lifts are way to much i find, like my grip gives out, and my legs shake like mad lol, 5 reps i end up using to much weight, and always hit brick walls, so thought i would go in the middle, 7 reps lol, pluss it seems like a nice number. pluss high reps on upper body i never seem to improve, strange really.



A 1/1 cadence?

i see this all the time in the gym and i tell the individual to slow the cadence down to about a 3/3 or 3/4 and they immediatley feel the level of resistance and intensity to be much more demanding. Im just curious to hear your reason for using a 1/1 cadence. What benefit do you find it possesses?
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Welshace13

DanBeitzel87 wrote:
Welshace13 wrote:
my rep speed isnt normally 4/4 stuff, its just controlled, it might be say like 2/2 maybe even 1/1, but i never bounce and always pause at the top and bottom to minimize the momentum. but its always controlled, just not slow lol.

10 reps on things like dead lifts are way to much i find, like my grip gives out, and my legs shake like mad lol, 5 reps i end up using to much weight, and always hit brick walls, so thought i would go in the middle, 7 reps lol, pluss it seems like a nice number. pluss high reps on upper body i never seem to improve, strange really.


A 1/1 cadence?

i see this all the time in the gym and i tell the individual to slow the cadence down to about a 3/3 or 3/4 and they immediatley feel the level of resistance and intensity to be much more demanding. Im just curious to hear your reason for using a 1/1 cadence. What benefit do you find it possesses?


im not going to disagree with slow rep cadences but to me they dont make sense, like if i was lifting up a box in work, i wouldnt lift it slowly, i would lift it pretty fast, thats the way i tend to lift in the gym, not fast,

but not slow, just controlled, plus that sort of training to me doesnt cross over into Powerlifting training, maybe there are some guys that can do a 10second rep and increase their power greatly,

but to me it doesnt seem logical, i dont know im not qualified to judge, but natural speed seems to help me allot and at 17 im getting pretty strong so i must be doing something right lol.
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rtestes

Mississippi, USA

Welshace13 wrote:
it doesnt seem logical, i dont know im not qualified to judge. at 17 im getting pretty strong so i must be doing something right lol.

How do you determine what weight you will use? How do you determine when to increase weight? How do you determine how many reps?

Maybe when you are older you might be strong enough and have enough stamina to do this:

http://youtube.com/...h?v=-kHE5jlFDXE

But I doubt it. you would rather do 7 reps or less.



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summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

rtestes wrote:
Welshace13 wrote:
it doesnt seem logical, i dont know im not qualified to judge. at 17 im getting pretty strong so i must be doing something right lol.

How do you determine what weight you will use? How do you determine when to increase weight? How do you determine how many reps?

Maybe when you are older you might be strong enough and have enough stamina to do this:

http://youtube.com/...h?v=-kHE5jlFDXE

But I doubt it. you would rather do 7 reps or less.





Is that guy having a rum and coke between sets? Good for him!

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AceHIT

I do 04 reps before I move up. Yes, four.

I lift at a 5/5 cadence so I get around 40 seconds of time under load. I find this is sufficient stimulus for me.

Once I experimented with chinning one week with 30 pounds attached to me and just bodyweight the following week.

In both cases I failed on the fourth repetition.
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