MB Madaera
Lost 31.7 lbs fat
Built 11.7 lbs muscle


Chris Madaera
Built 9 lbs muscle


Keelan Parham
Lost 30 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle


Bob Marchesello
Lost 23.55 lbs fat
Built 8.55 lbs muscle


Jeff Turner
Lost 25.5 lbs fat


Jeanenne Darden
Lost 26 lbs fat
Built 3 lbs muscle


Ted Tucker
Lost 41 lbs fat
Built 4 lbs muscle

 
 

Determine the Length of Your Workouts

Evaluate Your Progress

Keep Warm-Up in Perspective


ARCHIVES >>

"Doing more exercise with less intensity,"
Arthur Jones believes, "has all but
destroyed the actual great value
of weight training. Something
must be done . . . and quickly."
The New Bodybuilding for
Old-School Results supplies
MUCH of that "something."

 

This is one of 93 photos of Andy McCutcheon that are used in The New High-Intensity Training to illustrate the recommended exercises.

To find out more about McCutcheon and his training, click here.

 

Mission Statement

H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy

Privacy Policy

Credits

LOG IN FORUM MAIN REGISTER SEARCH
Periodization Question
Author
Rating
Options

stevecollins33

Hi Dr Darden

I wonder if you could share with us your thoughts on periodization - and whether it has any place in HIT.

According to my own observations, this concept is gathering momentum in many training spheres. Personally, I believe it can be reconcilled with HIT and is probably adopted by many HIT trainees like myself already.

There are a plethora of suggestions based around a standard HIT workout using compound movements three times a week.
Example 1: Monday may use a rep range around 8-12; Wednesday 6-8; Friday (NTF) 25-30.
Example 2: 4-week cycle using low reps; followed by 4-week cycle using medium reps; followed by 4-week cycle using high reps.
The possibilities are almost endless, e.g. superset compound movements on a Friday; do all exercises back to back once a fortnight, etc.

In your opinion, do you believe this is a valid mode of training that can be utilised alongside HIT? Any feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Steve
Open User Options Menu

Mr. Strong

Keep it simple, periodization is a unnecessary way of complicating things.

Train, Eat, Rest, Improve.

If you don't improve change things up, if you are improving don't fix what is not broken.
Open User Options Menu

Crotalus

I used to think cycling your training intensity was a waste of time too, only because at the time I believed everything my HIT authors said .

Though I still have the utmost respect for those guys I now realize ... years later than I should have .... that everything doesn't work for everyone the same ; even if 'my guys' said so.

When I finally got smart enough to question that MAYBE what they suggested wasn't the best approach for ME and I try something a little bit different, my progress immediately started up again and I reached goals I never would have thought was possible.

Cycling my training intensity at different times of the year was a major breakthrough for me, something I had voided for years because I read it wasn't necessary.




Open User Options Menu

notinheritable

I agree with Mr. Intensity. Keep it simple. I'm new to HIT and enjoying every minute of it, for the first time in a long time I'm making progress week by week. Why go and complicate matters. I don't see why it shouldn't work for everyone. A muscle is a muscle. One has to simply stress the muscle enough for it to adapt and grow, you don't need hours in the gym for that to happen. It's quite logical. If it works now it will always work. Simple. I must say, INTENSITY is key. If you are not achieving results, you are not intense enough. It takes guts to train with a high level of intensity. Simple.
Open User Options Menu

Growl

Crotalus wrote:
I used to think cycling your training intensity was a waste of time too, only because at the time I believed everything my HIT authors said .

Though I still have the utmost respect for those guys I now realize ... years later than I should have .... that everything doesn't work for everyone the same ; even if 'my guys' said so.

When I finally got smart enough to question that MAYBE what they suggested wasn't the best approach for ME and I try something a little bit different, my progress immediately started up again and I reached goals I never would have thought was possible.

Cycling my training intensity at different times of the year was a major breakthrough for me, something I had voided for years because I read it wasn't necessary.






Nice post, Jim. Do what's best for YOU and leave the dogma behind.
Jeff

Open User Options Menu

summaHIT

Ontario, CAN

If you do not cycle the intensity (% of your max) you are short-changing your potential.
Open User Options Menu

stevecollins33

Seems like a 50-50 split at the moment regarding this topic but I'm certainly siding with the periodization/cycling theory.

Mr Intensity's view is at best simplistic. However it is more of a tautology and lends nothing to the argument.

Instead I think most of us, through experience, have discovered that key goal, i.e. "progress", through cycling/periodization. The best part, in my opinion, is that this can be done in concert with HIT.

I have personally progressed by incorporating two high-rep, no rest between exercises, full-body routines a week with one session using low reps and one-minute rest intervals.
As would be expected, I believe my body may now be eventually displaying signs of overtraining prompting another change of intensity (phase/cycle/period) - and further progress as a result.
Open User Options Menu

OSAKA/J

I think it is a must to cycle on/off when training. Regardless of the programme you employ, number of sets, rest days, etc. it all can become a bit too much on the CNS and musculo-skeletal system when training hard. It simply can't be done; even the "genetic wonders" and/or steroid users have to cycle down their weights/programmes from time to time.

Having said that, there is a big difference between taking an extra day off when not feeling ready, and just slacking. One shouldn't make excuses for dogging it in the gym.

Personally, I've found that my best results have come from training hard to failure for five weeks, then backing off for two. As with all other things, it will be highly individual, influenced IMHO mainly by age and/or previous injuries.

Just my take on all this...

Osaka/J
Open User Options Menu

cmg

OSAKA/J wrote:
I think it is a must to cycle on/off when training. Regardless of the programme you employ, number of sets, rest days, etc. it all can become a bit too much on the CNS and musculo-skeletal system when training hard. It simply can't be done; even the "genetic wonders" and/or steroid users have to cycle down their weights/programmes from time to time.

Having said that, there is a big difference between taking an extra day off when not feeling ready, and just slacking. One shouldn't make excuses for dogging it in the gym.

Personally, I've found that my best results have come from training hard to failure for five weeks, then backing off for two. As with all other things, it will be highly individual, influenced IMHO mainly by age and/or previous injuries.

Just my take on all this...

Osaka/J


I'm with you Osaka. Though I don't do a 5/2 workout intensity scheme I do throw in the occassional NTF. I may do it once or may do both my workouts for the week NTF.

Regards,

Ron

Open User Options Menu

tylerg

I would suggest that, according to TNHIT, there are at least 4 phases (periods) involved in the Doc's methods.

I know that training for sports, one must incorporate periodized training of some sort, or, literally, die trying. For example, I will work out much harder in May/June than in August, just prior to regular season. The intensity of lifting will be different, as will the types of exercises.
Open User Options Menu

CJHoward

This is an old thread, I'm just adding my 2 cents, wanting for more discussion on this topic.

IMHO, I think there is quite a bit of misunderstanding of what H.I.T. is.

Here, it seems the prevalent thought is that H.I.T is brief work outs.. to failure.

Other sites, Bulletin Boards, Forums don't necessarily see the need to go to failure to be considered High Intensity. On those sites, periodization, 5x5, multiple sets fit perfectly with HIT.

Open User Options Menu

Waynes

Switzerland

CJHoward wrote:
This is an old thread, I'm just adding my 2 cents, wanting for more discussion on this topic.

IMHO, I think there is quite a bit of misunderstanding of what H.I.T. is.

Here, it seems the prevalent thought is that H.I.T is brief work outs.. to failure.

Other sites, Bulletin Boards, Forums don't necessarily see the need to go to failure to be considered High Intensity. On those sites, periodization, 5x5, multiple sets fit perfectly with HIT.



HIT is now low intensity to me, its more like long distance running, very long draw out hard training, but not very productive for adding on much strength or muscle.

Wayne
Open User Options Menu

crazeeJZ

CJHoward wrote:
This is an old thread, I'm just adding my 2 cents, wanting for more discussion on this topic.

IMHO, I think there is quite a bit of misunderstanding of what H.I.T. is.

Here, it seems the prevalent thought is that H.I.T is brief work outs.. to failure.

Other sites, Bulletin Boards, Forums don't necessarily see the need to go to failure to be considered High Intensity. On those sites, periodization, 5x5, multiple sets fit perfectly with HIT.


Periodization in the form of alternating NTF and Failure during the week works better for me. Thursdays I go up in reps or weight and go to failure on all exercises, 4 days rest. Mondays I do the same weights and reps as the previous Thursday(which is NTF), 3 days rest.

Progress has been more consistent weekly(Thursdays) this way.

I do 2 sets per exercise, fast reps.
Open User Options Menu

fbcoach

tylerg wrote:
I would suggest that, according to TNHIT, there are at least 4 phases (periods) involved in the Doc's methods.

I know that training for sports, one must incorporate periodized training of some sort, or, literally, die trying. For example, I will work out much harder in May/June than in August, just prior to regular season. The intensity of lifting will be different, as will the types of exercises.


This is a very good post as well as thought provoking. I agree, everyone must cycle their training, either the intensity (amount of weight), voulme, or frequency. Our biology forces us to. You can't stay awake forever. You can't stay young forever. You can't stay on a weightloss diet for ever and expect to lose weight contiuously, and you can't train at your peak intensities forever. Cycling is a must! Great thread!
Open User Options Menu
H.I.T. Acceptable Use Policy